Old Photo Postcard - Brass Era "Doctors" Coupe Street Scene, Front And Back

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo Postcard - Brass Era "Doctors" Coupe Street Scene, Front And Back
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:01 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Murray - Anacortes, WA on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:07 am:

Unmitigated proof...finally !! That pic should settle it. Well done Jay...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:08 am:

1913 runabout with accessory top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n Los Angeles CA on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 12:14 am:

A TRUE Dr's coupe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 06:04 am:

Great photo Jay, but is that the "Dr's Coupe" or is it a wealthy patient's car?

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 07:02 am:

Some folks called them Dr's coupe -- and some folks still call them Dr's coupes. Just like some people called an air cooled VW type 1 car a "Bug" or "Punch Buggy."

As Erik pointed out it is actually a runabout with an accessory top. Zooming in shows that it is a later 1914 model as you can just make out the curve at the bottom of the 1914 passenger door and you can see the lip on the front fenders that the 1913 and early 1914 cars did NOT have that lip. (ref page 174-175 Bruce McCalley's (R.I.P.) "Model T Ford")

Note it also has electric headlamps that appear to be mounted on the gas lamp forks. Easily could have been an accessory as they were sold for that purpose.

The date it was post marked was Jan 7, 1915. And you can see the winter front cover on the radiator and I believe you can also see the chains or something similar on the passenger rear wheel. Did the good Dr. L. R. Clary recently purchase the car, have the photo made, and using it to advertise his services? And if so, how old was the car? Bruce sometimes wondered not so much if any of the 1915s came equipped with gas lamps (there are pre-production photos of a Centerdoor with gas headlamps) but did any of the 1914s that continued to be produced did any of them come with electric headlamps from the branch factory? If anyone has additional information on when Dr. L. R. Clary purchased the car, please let us know. Or other information on 1914 style cars that have the electric headlamps. In this case I suspect they were accessory headlamps but there is a very slim possibility that the car was produced/sold in late Dec very very early Jan in which case could they have been from the factory?

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 07:23 am:

Zoomed in photo? What photo? Oops photo is shown below:





Respectfully added,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 09:09 am:

I like the idea of the accessory hardtop for a runabout, but I wonder how it was attached? It would be great to find a period advertisement or period installation instructions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 09:12 am:

And here it is! :-)

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/116333.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 09:57 am:

Here's one I saw at "Speedy Bill's" Museum of Speed in Lincoln, NE.



Speedy Bill even has a spare one in stock:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 08:51 pm:

That top conversion, fitted to a flat dash car, requires a cowl top. It would be interesting to see how it is fitted/sealed.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:01 am:

Nice car but an equally beautiful building. Boy they sure don't design/build 'em like that anymore!! Wish they did. That structure is just gorgeous. And it's probably still there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 12:05 pm:

Tim,

I can't even imagine what the cost per square foot would be in today's construction market to reproduce that building brick for brick. Whoever built it clearly intended it to still be there 100 years later, and beyond.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 01:30 pm:

The whole scene speaks to how contemporary logic and taste dictated
a blend of organic materials and decorative detail. The idea to remove
detail as a matter of "cleaner" looks had not even appeared on the horizon
of design thought. Design was still "celebrating" it's emergence from the
clapboard and sod era in America.

Even the electrical strikes were semi-decorative and often prominently
mounted on the front of the building to let all comers know that this "uptown"
facility was so equipped. Note the two side pins mounted at the barge line
dropping the two wire circuit (three wire neutral systems were still a few years
off) to the entry block at the upper left window. Construction like this would
cause coronaries with many electrical inspectors today, but in good working
order, was perfectly adequate for some simple lighting circuits.

It would be in the late teens and early twenties that electrical utilities would
do hard marketing pushes to inspire customers to install many of the appliances
we take for granted today. Back then, most were wood/coal fired or required
manual labor. So, wiring such as we see here only fed a few lights and was
ample, but more importantly, displaying it front and center was a sign of social
status. Today we see it as clutter and a "hazard". Similar to how most people
would think of owning a Model T as their daily driver today, only a little more
"quaint" to look at.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 07:30 pm:

Henry, you're right! Definitely would be for the "rich and famous"!! :-) But every time I look at that building I just love it. Man what a neat house that would make, and I wouldn't doubt that it currently has been converted into one. I sure hope it's still wherever it is right now. I absolutely love old buildings, as much as old cars! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Correll - Carlsbad CA on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 12:42 am:

Google maps shows the building at 34 South 4th Street, Pekin Illinois. This view is from 2011. The bad news is that the satellite view shows that most of the block was leveled sometime after July 2011. Looks like just bare dirt there now. What a pity. It was a really nice little building. Dr. Lawrence R. Clary was the coroner or deputy coroner for Tazewell County. Apparently famous for dealing with the inquest regarding sinking of the Columbia steamboat and loss of 87 lives, July 5, 1918.

Which only goes to prove that you NEVER know where a Model T may take you.Clary Office 2011


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