Car with a low tire showing up-grade to electric lights and what are these sidelights?-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Car with a low tire showing up-grade to electric lights and what are these sidelights?-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 01:11 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 01:36 pm:

Very early 1915. Fenders are 1915, body is 1914. She is obviously waiting for AAA to arrive to take care of that tire.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 02:02 pm:

e&j mod 32 s.charlet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 02:07 pm:

That is another wonderful Photo in many ways.
Thanks again Herb.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 03:18 pm:

Herb - thanks for the photo!

Bill,

I agree with you that the curved rear fenders without any crown are the 1915-16 model year style. But the flat front fenders with the lip were used mid-1914-ish through 1916 model year. (see below for refs and description). Also note that the car appears to have the aluminum crank handle [or possibly a later crank handle painted a light color?]. The aluminum one was phased out for USA production during 1914 for the more common late 1914-1921 style crank handle. (Again please see below for refs and description). And the body is a USA produced body as it has the dummy door on the left side (USA driver’s side) while the Canadian and English 1914 Fords had an opening front door on the left side.

Based on that I believe it is likely that the car either had the rear fenders changed (at least the left one) or the crank handle changed (or perhaps both?). But if the crank handle is original to the car then the car would have been produced earlier rather than later in the 1914 model year. Combined with the lip on the front fenders would make it mid 1914ish model year. Also even if the car came from the factory in Jan or Feb 1915 with the 1914 style body and 1915 style rear fenders, I believe it would be referred to as a 1914 model year car based on the body – although others may believe differently about that.

Bruce at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1915-16H.htm states, “The new touring and roadster bodies, though, were introduced at the Highland Park plant in January 1915. Many, if not all, of the Ford assembly plants continued making the 1914 style open cars until perhaps April 1915, so there is considerable overlap in the production of the 1914 and 1915 open cars.”

Additional references:

Fenders:
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/F-H.htm#fen1
1914
Similar to 1913 but with the front bill reinstated and with reinforcing beads added across widest part of the front, and in apron area on the front and rear fenders. Later versions appeared with the embossed moldings in the splash apron area and with a front bill. Front fender bracket secured with four rivets (as in all previous fenders). Used from late 1913 to early 1915.
1915-1916

Similar in style to the late 1914 type; front bill, three rivets now used to secure the front fender iron bracket. Rear fenders were now curved to follow the wheel outline and have no crown. Bracket added between splash apron and rear fender.

Crank handle:
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/C-D.htm#crank
1912-1914
Aluminum [crank] handle the same as the later 1911 type (All black, including handle.) In February 1911, however, a letter read, “Removed ridges from outside of handle and added dimensions specifying the exact shape of same. Called for polish all over.”
1914-1921
[Crank] Handle changed to an iron sleeve, held with a rivet-like bolt. Later versions have been seen which used a riveted-in-place pin instead of the bolt.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 03:57 pm:

The body side panel bead above the rear fender appears to be straight rather than following the line of the fender. Makes you wonder if the car originally had flat straight fenders a la 1914, or if the factory ran out of 1914 fenders and installed the new style. Or maybe the driver backed into something, and was talked into installing the latest style by the dealer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 04:07 pm:

It looks like fender problems are not new to that car. Narrow garage? Quick steering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

What we think of as the "1915" touring body style was not being built in any quantity until March 1915, and only at the Highland Park plant.

Ford factory records ( Thanks to Trent Boggess) Accession 125 Finance — Model T Cost Books 1913-1927 only show 36 tourings shipped from Highland Park in January 1915. In February 1915 the number went up to 5674. 1915 fiscal year touring production was 244,181 from August 1914 - the end of July 1915. Average monthly touring production was over 20,000 units per month, so a real 1915 body style touring made in 1915 model year is a tough thing to find today. Most of those 244,181 "1915" tourings were built with what we think of as the 1914 body style.

I believe the car shown in Herb's photo is indeed a 1915 touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 05:02 pm:

Hap, when I look through a lot of original photos of new or nearly new 1913 and '14 Fords, they seems to have had the crank handle black painted from factory even if it was aluminium. Maybe the T in the above picture had some odd accessory like a rubber cover for the handle or maybe the lighting in the photo plays some tricks - it isn't sure it's aluminium we're seeing, even if it's possible that the black paint flaked off the handle after much use - so maybe it is aluminium, it's impossible to say..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 07:16 pm:

My God she looks like Elmira Gulch (a.k.a. wicked witch from the west) on the Wizard of Oz!! Auntie Em! Auntie Em! And your little dog too!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, March 29, 2015 - 09:38 pm:

Egads, you're right--guess she traded in her bicycle!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:26 am:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Hamilton_(actress)

:-)


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