What did you do today #4 April

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What did you do today #4 April
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 08:22 pm:

So I want to run stock wire wheels on my '14 speedster. While it would have probably been easier if I just had a later '26-'27 rear end - I don't have one. So I made some spacers for the rear wheels so that the rims would clear my small drum AC brakes.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 08:36 pm:

Seth, Thanks for starting the new month, I was going to do it tomorrow if no one else did.

You could have used a couple of roll pins to locate the spacers to keep them in place too. That is what I did on my adapters going on t-hubs that I have.

For me, today I started on making my seat brackets for the doodlebug. Probably about half way done give or take. Not bad for couple hours of work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

Is it April already? Oh, I know. You can't fool me. APRIL FOOL!!! Hahahaha.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Eyre on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:32 pm:

Paint maintence on Gordon Kolls 26 nonstarter runabout I restored about 10 years ago and put a 12 rivet clamshell rear end together for a 11 torpedo roadster I'm restoring for my father Phil Eyre. It's just the first day of my Spring Break from my day job as a sixth grade classroom teacher. 6 more days to work on Model ts this week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

No problem Chad. I figured the last one was getting really long.

I did the best I could to center the spacers. I probably should have gotten them made from aluminum but I can weld the steel. I don't have a TiG setup. Unfortunately the steel is very heavy. I'm probably going to get these spin balanced so I don't have any funky wheel hop at speed. They turned out great though - can't wait to try them on the car. I also really like my TiN coated lug nuts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

Put my T away before the rains return. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 10:31 pm:

Seth,

The thing is, if you are off on the centering and try to balance them, you will have to add a lot more weight to one side---I'm sure you knew that though. That is why I chose to center mine with an indicator, pin them, then in my case, bolt them on. Glad you found a solution to your issue though, that is what is most important.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 10:34 pm:

Rather than add weight, I was going to let them drill it out of the side of the spacer that is heavy. They might not have to do much at all as they are already very well centered. I just want to get them balanced to check.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, March 30, 2015 - 11:57 pm:

We started today to put all new innards in the rear end of my barn fresh 1912 touring. New axles, ring and pinion, new modern outer wheel bearings, adjustable spool bearing and assorted other bits and pieces.

Did find the 4 rivits holding the front driveshaft yoke on were all loose and allowing the yoke to slide on the drive shaft. We decided to chuck the torque tube in my "watch makers" lathe and knurl the nose end for an interference fit between the tube and the yoke.

We then rotated the torque tube 1 stud spacing (60 degrees) and drilled the rivet holes oversize in the yoke. We repositioned the yoke and welded the yoke to the torque tube thru the oversize holes. We welded one hole then moved 180 degrees and welded the other hole and repeated the process for the remaining 2 holes. We used stainless rod for less splatter and better penetration.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 09:56 am:

Going to go get some yellow paint for my wire heels today. Might even ride in the speedster if it warms up just a bit more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

Spent a couple of hours trying to get the crank pulley off because the pin sheared. Got the pin remnants out and borrowed a puller that might work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 03:21 pm:

Why remove the pulley?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 08:15 pm:

I got the 27 touring out of winter storage. She started right up, after 4 or five pulls. After a short drive around the field, she is still starting on compression/free starts. Im going to install my new rebuilt Ron Patterson coils tomorrow, and then remove my Kevlar bands. I'm going back to my old Scandinavians, or Wards bands. I just do not like the "feel" of the Kevlar bands. Probably just "me". Ill carry the Kevlars as my "back up, just in case set". After that I should be ready for the years touring .. :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 08:25 pm:

Donnie I drove a T with Kevlar and it just felt too harsh. I like the wood bands. They're a nice compromise. Like you said, to me anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 02:24 am:

Replaced the muffler that I blew out in a December rain storm with a new one and replaced the original horn that needs attention with a different original from a forum member.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 07:38 pm:

Finishing the restoration of the coach lights on my '13, now on to the Carbide Generator and running boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom VanMeeteren Valley, Nebraska on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 08:46 pm:

I spent the morning mounting a tire on my new wheel that Melvin Stutzman rebuilt for me for my 1911 touring. Stutzman does excellent work. Had to be careful not to chip the new paint on it. Then installed the speedometer road gear and had to use a three cornered file to remove some dings on the axle cap threads. Mounted the wheel on the car and it looks great. I have been concerned because this wheel was original wood for the spokes and fellows and it was starting to get floppy. Now I have four new wheels and I feel a lot safer going do the road. Then I reworked the 7 way plug on my trailer and removed all the corrosion and stripped the wires back to get good contacts again. Now all the lights and winch work again. This afternoon I split a hugh load of wood for the shop next winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:09 pm:

Finished up fabricating my rear crossmember for the doodlebug, and it is ready to install hopefully this weekend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

Test drove my coupe - it's happy with fresh plugs. Hooked up a brake equalizer connecting my brake pedal to the large drum rear brakes acting on Cx#zy drums (cast braking surface). All good so I swapped out my Anderson timer for one of those heretical electronic timers - works GREAT. I'll keep the Anderson and another set of coils in the trunk for now but suspect they will be spare for someone else rather than going back in my car right away. Ready to drive north to see the tulip fields with the local T club tomorrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

Rear end restoration continued,

so we installed new US made axles, new brass thrust washers, ring and pinion plus the adjustable spool bearing and the new style needle bearing for the drive shaft.

So, here's the rub, why can't repro manufactures make a accurate part? The axles had the key way slot at a different demension that the originals, this cause the keys to stand proud of the axle gears. This caused a total binding of the carrier when assembled. You would think they would be savy enough to just access the original print to copy. How hard could that be? For the time spent fixing their screw up I could have carved my own new axles. I'm guessing they were made on a CNC machine center and I guess the programmer was more concerned about the up coming weekend.

So after spending far to much time thinking the problem and disassembling the axle at least 5 times we discovered the keys were the problem due to the incorrect placement of the keyway as matched side by side with the 2 original axles we replaced. We ended up using a cut off wheel to shorten the key flush with the gear.

So we now move onto the new brass spacers to replace the old babbit ones. Seems even with modern machining capabilities either they can't read a mic or have no idea how to program a CNC machine. There was considerable difference between the 2 spacers thicknesses, one was .212 and the other was .206. We ended up disassembling the rear axle yet again to machine to shims to their proper thickness.

So all in all we spent 2 days doing a 4 hour job, due to poor quality repro parts. I don't blame the vendors I blame the guys manufacturing the parts. So to you guys charge a few more dollars and do it right!!!!!! either that or hire an old time honest to god machinist that can read a print and a mic. In our business if we continually screwed up like this we would be out of business.

just sayin'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 01:48 am:

I have my speedster back on the road with its new EE Ford one piece crankshaft. It's a PROPER boat tail.boattail

The deck is done with Philipine mahogany with Queensland hoop pine inserts.lid

Of course, if you have a boat tail, one has fishtail exhaust!

The drum tail light is a converted Bosch bicycle headlight. It goes with the all brass drum headlights.

I can't get over how much more responsive snd easier it is to drive without the Ruckstell and 3 to.1 gearset.

I can post other photos if interested.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 03:31 am:

Actually you are supposed to mix/match of file/shim those brass/bronze washer/spacers in the rear axle to set the pinion-crownwheel clearance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 07:00 am:

Allan would you post more pics of the rest of your speedster? Don't forget pics of what's under the hood!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 08:10 am:

Allan, that is too cool!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 08:22 am:

Looks more like a boat bow than a boat tail. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 03:20 pm:

As long as my '59 Chev was out of the shed I grabbed the '27 Tudor for an outing.
I last ran it in early November, shut the gas off, ran the carb dry and that was that.
It started today as if it ran an hour ago....... :-O
The '19 Touring will do the same but I have to get the Mustang out of the way.
Too darn windy today for that anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 03:33 pm:

I painted and installed the door latch grommet that Phil Mino kindly sent me. While I was at it, I finally installed the trim welting around the edge of the door panel (although the panel looked fine to me without the welting). :-)

door


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 03:41 pm:

I fit the rear body panel to the wood framework today. It might not be a preferred method but works for this car. A tight fit requires a little persuasion.



A light wet-sanding with 80 grid reveals any high spots that can be dollied out.



This certainly isn't a good method either but I chose to bond a new panel to the old one using Bondo. I also am using some flathead screws to hold the panels together if and when they separate.



I don't recommend these techniques but show them here as a reminder that there are many ways to feed a cat. :0)

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Stewart -Calif. on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 04:53 pm:

By what stretch of the imagination is that any of your business? Ha Ha Ha...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 05:44 pm:

Egads! I didn't notice until I posted my door picture that the door hinge is attached to the body with what I thought were Phillips screws. However, when I tried to remove them, they just spun.

So, I removed the footwell trim and found out that they are long Phillips head machine screws with washers and nylon insert locking nuts. Some time in the past the body wood holes were drilled clear through for the bolts.

I assume that the hinge was originally held on to the body wood by slotted head wood screws, am I correct?

If so, I'll glue some fresh wood into the drilled holes so that they will hold the slotted wood screws securely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 05:56 pm:

Mark, my '14 had 2 machine screws in each door that went through and had nuts. The same was true on the body side of the hinge. I believe that was maintained all the way to '25.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Thanks, Richard. The bolts and nuts do hold the hinge securely, I think I'll try to find some slotted head bolts the same size as the Phillips head bolts. They are probably called stove bolts, right? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 06:19 pm:

Mark, here is an untouched '24



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 06:34 pm:

Pretty much the same as a stove bolt. Actually a flat head machine screw. #12 x 1.8 long is what the '24 in the picture above has. #12s may be hard to find. It looks like they used a square nut and a flat washer with no lockwasher. That seems strange to me. It won't show. #12 x 1" wood screws in the other holes.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 06:41 pm:

To add insult to injury, the Phillips head bolts that were in there are metric. :-(

I have one old #12 x 1 1/2 inch wood screw, so I tried it in the holes and it feels like it will grab nicely in the holes the previous owner drilled for the metric Phillips bolts. I'm going to go to the local (non-chain) hardware store to see if they have some #12 x 1 inch wood screws. If I can get some #12 stove bolts, I'll get them as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 07:01 pm:

Began taking apart the front axle found at Chickasha. Neat thing is this axle had a pair of accessory wishbone supports that tie wrap to the axle.



So little wrench work ahead.



Then figured why not put those cool wishbone supports on Nellie. So cleaned them and installed.


Curved bolt head wraps to the axle.


Underside view showing the clamp around the wishbone and axle.


Bolt is tightened to secure clamp and add the lock nut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, April 03, 2015 - 03:45 am:

Seth and others, photos as requested.speedster

The major criterion for my speedster was comfort, so an enclosed body was top priority.

door

The doors are sloped at the rear to allow easy access to the seats

front axle

The project started with the purchase of this dropped axle at a swap meet.motor

The engine has a Chaffins tour cam, slightly larger valves and the usual alloy pistons. The head is a Reader alloy low head and the headers are home made. Otherwise it is quite tame.

Hope you like it.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, April 03, 2015 - 11:12 am:

Very nice craftsmanship. Thanks for posting the pictures.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nino Knobloch on Friday, April 03, 2015 - 03:47 pm:

I think, the BOSCH Rotodyn bycicle headlamp to use as a tail light is a nice idea! And yes, I like boattail cars to! I have got a Citroen from 1919 in this shape. Have postet a picture here at "show your shop"
Kind regards Nino


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 03, 2015 - 10:22 pm:

I blasted.


Oil filler cap, speedometer gear, hub, plate, and most of a rim. The rims are slow going because you have to go at them from several angles to reach everywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 06:23 am:

Just build a light switch plate for the 1922 "woody" roadster.

In the past we build a wooden coil box with a 1914 switch on it. Together with master coil the car had 3 contact switch, way to much and three times risk for troubles.
Took an old switch plate from the rust and build a switch just for the lights. The amp meter is a Fordson Dexta meter I found in the old stock part of the workshop.

Happy Easter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 06:56 am:

I just finished a starter who was bought as a
[ REBUILD ] !! at Hershey.
Toon
2057R
2060R
2061R
2063R
2064R


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 09:58 am:

Toon,
Now it is rebuild.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 10:26 am:

Here's what I fixed this week:






Link to story and full sized images on the Model T Forum:

http://www.modelt.org/mtfcivb/showthread.php/1280-Fixing-a-broken-top-bow?p=3961#post3961


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 10:59 am:

André ; Can you replace the coils in your WOODY,or are that BUILDIN coils .
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:02 am:

André ; sorry must be BUILD-IN


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:42 am:

Toon,
I can take the coils out but I need to loose the box and pull it backwards.
In the box are four coils I build to work with the Master Vibrator Coil. As I take the car out, I have always normal spare coils in the car. As the the MVC stops working I just need to loose the box. take the coils out and put the normal coils in, disconnect the MVC wiring and connect the battery wire and the magneto wire on the box terminals and I am running again. Takes about 15 min.
Coils on the photos are the ones I build for MVC.
New capacitors and working points, I just need to take off the bridge and the coils are working normally. I will take a few photos tomorrow about all the system.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 02:35 pm:

Painted my wire wheels today! A rotisserie motor would have been nice but I felt like they turned out pretty well anyway.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By robert wright on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 11:27 pm:

blasted some t wheels yesterday

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTw9kBrbkcQ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 11:40 pm:

Wow I like those headers. I put a rebuilt engine and trans. in my 26 roadster two weeks ago and I put some more miles on it today. We had great weather and it keeps running better each time I take it out. I am having a great time with this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 12:59 am:

At last Tuesday's meeting, Hutch and Jim Patterson walked me through the science
of dialing in the points on the coils. Jim then invited a group of us out to his place on
Saturday to do some capacitor replacement. I fell into a "deep hole" of tar, poured in
after a fairly recent rebuild. With no way of seeing that this work had already been done
through all that tar, all had to be dug out and replaced. The tar was super tough and a
real PITA to carve out. Broke one box badly, but got them all done and dialed in. Today
I set about getting the box glued up and put back together. With the radiator in the shop
having a leak repaired, I am chasing out small bugs while I wait. Bought the mat'ls to
make a headlight ring tool. Will be working on that next.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 01:01 am:

As promise yesterday here other photos of the MVC ignition and two dropbox links with the running engine.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/86573299/DSCN4277.MOV

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/86573299/DSCN4278.MOV


Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By wes heustess on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 01:02 am:

I had a potluck brunch before kayaking across the Columbia to play archery tag then I practiced ground flying my paraglider before cleaning plugs and taking the t for a spin with this old gal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 01:37 am:

Attended Easter service at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco on Nob Hill, then took mom and dad to lunch at the Fairmont. Sill had time to get home and line bore some mains on a job hat has to be out the door before we head for Bakersfield. Pretty good day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 06:32 pm:

I removed a bearing sleeve from a rear end housing.

slv

It didn't take all day, but it seemed like it. I put so much pressure on my sleeve removal tool that I destroyed it. Then I tried driving things in behind the sleeve to bend it inward, but that didn't seem to help. I finally took a torch and cut a slot in it as far down as I could reach (that's it on the far side). That helped enough that I could grab it with vise-grips and pry it out using a long bar. About an hour and a half total. The bad new is that it was an inner sleeve which I had hoped to reuse. I don't think I'll be able to reuse this one. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 09:36 pm:

Shot a selfie with lilacs in bloom.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 06:30 pm:

Decided to run a little bench test on the rear-end i rebuilt over the winter. On stands, ran the car for a good hour or so in gear, listening for any unusual sounds and checking for leaks. Rear-end was very quiet and tight as a drum. :-) As a final test i inserted a long flexible magnet into the oil to see if there was any metal shavings that might indicate a problem, but found nothing but nice new gear oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 07:32 pm:

Quick and dirty artwork


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 07:34 pm:

LOL, Bob, you must have hit the "Vincent Van Gogh" button on your picture editing software! :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Barchock Canton, Mi on Thursday, April 09, 2015 - 08:55 am:

Got the girl fired up for the first time yesterday. Now onto the body

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=897979753591747&l=7856916711404315933


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Scherzer on Thursday, April 09, 2015 - 11:17 am:

Just finished a batch of KRW timing cover locators being sold to some of T vendors. Bob



timing cover locators


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, April 10, 2015 - 10:40 am:

Radiator back from shop. Straightened a few crooked fins, did a finer
cleaning and got it painted.



Been moving my work bench area to the front of the shop to clear the
floor in back for a new slab this summer. Should also help this messy old
guy be a little less disorganized.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, April 10, 2015 - 10:50 am:

I dunno Burger. In my experience when us messy old guys add room to be a little less disorganized what a usually happens is a bigger mess. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, April 10, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

I'd like to say that I have no idea what you are talking about ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, April 10, 2015 - 09:10 pm:

Worked on the floor of doodlebug today--see doodlebug thread. Hoping to get it done, and the seat and battery box mounted all back up by Monday night (I took Monday off from work)---of course I have ten thousand other projects to do too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 08:39 pm:

Took my turn. I know many of you do this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Paulsen - McPherson, KS on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 10:02 pm:

We fabricated shock absorber brackets for my daughter's speedster today.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 10:16 pm:

I had not foreseen this being a difficult task. Installing the rear fender irons through this small hole proved to be almost as aggravating as changing bands can be. Threading 6 carriage bolts through the iron, spacer and seat frame holes was tedious for adult hands. Where are cops and Grand kids when you need them. The final location of the seat frame required a spacer and some redesign of top iron brackets. All ended well, before dark. Then a nap was required.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 10:51 pm:

I have been unloading the parts I got from a large estate of T parts and other things. There are way to many pics to post, but here are a few from the first load.

parts 1

parts 2

parts 3

parts 4

parts 5

parts 6

parts 8

parts 7

parts 9


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 08:41 am:

Made patch panels.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 09:30 am:

Nice job Richard. It just shows what can be accomplished with some thought and homemade simple jigs and tools. Although sometimes the "simple jig" is not so simple to make. :-) :-) Thanks for posting ..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

Thanks Donnie. The beading tooling I made for a Maxwell door and has come in handy for other pieces.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 11:12 pm:

Chris Paulsen, my son found that connecting rods from a late Ford V8, perhaps a 302, are the same bore as the T rear axle housing. They will make excellent shocker brackets for the rear once an appropriate thread is welded to the cut off rod beam. They look kind of made for the job.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 06:30 am:

Yesterday, I practice some crank starting. The problem I am finding is that I do not have enough strength in my left arm to grab the crank handle with my left hand and pull towards the right quickly enough. I just may have to buck the system and do it with my right hand/arm--carefully.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 09:08 am:

Chad -- You shouldn't need to pull the crank to the right; just lift up on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 02:11 pm:

Chad, I agree with Mike. If starting on battery, all you need to do is pull up on the crank. I can start my car by pulling up as slowly as I can. As soon as the timer makes contact, she starts. I still have to crank it three pulls while choking, before I turn the key to battery.. I see people jerking hard on the crank, spinning the motor, ect. If it does not start just with a slow pull upward, I try to figure out why, and fix it. Mag starting is different, but battery starting is easy ... :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 04:42 pm:

Donnie, did you get the drive head and pouring plates, etc., with the K R Wilson combination machine?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 05:19 pm:

Stan, All I got was what is in the photo. I already have a complete machine with all the T stuff. I need the A stuff to start collecting the A setup. The bed plate, boring bar fixture, large reamer, false cam, a extra boring bar with adjustable cutters and a cutter setting micrometer were for Model A. I was going to sell the combination machine base, but I think Ill make a bed plate for straightening pans and bolt it to the combination machine base. I do have the model T reamer and the bearing scrapers left to sell. Not a bad ratio of "Keep" to "Sell" if I must say so myself. :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 05:22 pm:

Chad

Mike & Donnie are right. Starting on battery does not require a "hard" or "fast" pull. Mine also starts with a very slow easy pull (on battery).

Also you can start a T safely with your right arm ... its actually easier than using your left, and every bit as safe. Since I've been using this method - no more arm/shoulder/back pain.

Just put your left hand on the right (passengers) front fender. Turn your right hand slightly counter clockwise (anti clockwise for the Brits and Aussies ;o) ) and grab the crank handle so that the knuckles of your right hand are on the OUTSIDE of the arc. Your little finger then faces to the rear of the car and the thumb is to the front.

Easier and less stress for us right handers with high mileage arms.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 06:21 pm:

Remember, Your Model T deserves the very best. #:0)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 06:42 pm:

"...and every bit as safe"

I wish you guys would stop telling new guys that it is safe to crank a car using your right hand. IT IS NOT!

Ford's instructions showed how to crank a T using the left hand, for a reason. That's the safest way to do it.

If your engine never kicks back, there will not be a problem cranking with either hand. Many of you are cranking on borrowed time, thinking that since you've never had a problem, it's safe. Steve Jelf thought that too, until he had his wrist broken a while back. He posted that here. He learned from that experience and is now a Southpaw cranker. Please learn from other people's experience and don't make all the mistakes yourself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 09:11 pm:

Oh boy, hope I didn't start the Great Crank Debate again, LOL.

I set the crank handle at 9 oclock, hold onto the left tire with my right hand, pull with my left hand and let go around the 12 oclock position whether it starts or not. I feel as well as most here that is the safest, but it is harder to do on the weaker arm.

What I am trying to determine is what the settings on my levers need to be at to start. And funny Donnie mentions starting while cranking real slow. It did not start on one of my pulls so I was carefully trying to real slowly turn the crank to get the crank handle in the right spot, and it started to my amazement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

Chad

Perhaps you could explain why cranking in the manner I described is any different/less safe than left hand cranking ?

You didn't mention the reason in your post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 10:47 pm:

PS No animosity or problem here .... just don't understand the difference. ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 11:25 pm:

Chad: All Ts are a little different as to the settings. But If everything is timed right and the timer makes contact aprox 17 degrees past top dead center (with the spark lever aprox 3 clicks down), and you have choked it two or three pulls (when cold) and you have opened up the high speed jet aprox 1/16 to 1/8 turn (when cold)there is no cranking to it. Just pull slowly up on the handle till the timer makes contact. and off you go. :-) There will be some slight differences between cars but that is a very close starting point ... The reason why I set my timing aprox 3 clicks down is for free starts. If I push the spark rod handle all the way up, and then turn the key on, my engine usually will not free start. Then if I pull down the spark rod handle down three clicks, I get a free start. Works 90 percent of the time... That is just how I do it. Other folks may have there own chosen starting techneique...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 11:49 pm:

It's easy for me to pull with my left because I'm only 73. Some of you older guys in your forties and fifties may have to use Bud's method. That will work too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCWnmPrxKo0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Saturday, April 18, 2015 - 12:41 am:

A couple friends drove over with their 18-36 Hart Parr and 16-30 Rumely tractors so in the spirit of playing I took the '27 Tudor out and when they were done playing we jumped into the '19 Touring to go for its 2015 inaugural drive on this 73º day.
Turned on the gas and hit the starter....vrooom......started as if it ran just yesterday having last been run in November....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, April 18, 2015 - 06:43 am:

Hi Bud, I think the key to any crank start and one you point out is to get your hand clear of the "arc" of the crank, no matter what method you use---I think I will now refer to the swing arc of the crank as the circle of death. I have never tried your method and may do so. I am one of the younger guys here, but my arm/hand strength has significantly decreased over the last few years. Some days I could pull a house down, other days it is uncomfortable to try and use a screwdriver.


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