Next question, painting wire wheels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Next question, painting wire wheels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:29 pm:

how have you spray painted wheels with an air gun? Can't use spray bomb because custom paint color. How to paint without runs or bare spots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

I use my wheel stand as it is adjustable and you can turn it 360,without touching wheel itself.Only problem is you can only paint one per day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 09:59 pm:

i used to have a rig i made with a gear reduction box which turned the wheel about as fast as a barbeque. it worked great because you could really lay on the paint for a perfect finish with no runs. i would have paint so heavy you had to leave it running for a couple hours for it to flow out. one wheel a day is the bad news. wire wheels use a lot of paint, or should i say waist a lot of paint. any other part needs 3 coats and you will hit it all, but wire wheels need 5 coats from every angle you can dream up and you will still see some dry spots when you examine the finished wheel--- unless you make the ronco wheel painter rig like i mentioned. before that, i would use a ladder layed across saw horses and set all five wheels on there standing up, and spray em. then, turn them 1/4 turn with every new coat. dont worry about the ladder marks on the paint job, the first four will blend in on the last coat, and the last marks are only on the edge where you cant see them, and will have paint on the part down to the primer. if it looks bad, touch with a brush


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick W. Emerich on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 10:19 pm:

Use a long 2 inch water pipe and hang it or set it on stands. You want plenty of room between the wheels. Rotate and spray use the area that goes under the tire to turn it. I use an old axle for wood wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

I had my wore wheels powdercoated; worked great, and they've got so many colors I had no problem finding exactly what I wanted. I don't remember the exact cost, but thought it was reasonable considering they sand blasted and powder coated them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 11:23 pm:

i know this is like talking water pumps and e timers, but quality paint is better than powder coat. in both cases, its all about the prep. if it aint clean, its not going to hold. where i work the mechanic told me years ago they have a place that powder coats truck wheels for 30 bucks, and car or pickups for 20 bucks. i couldnt believe my ears because i know when i sand blast and epoxy prime and real automotive quality paint wheels, it cost a heck of a lot more than 20 bucks. well, i was about to buy a new set of tires for the pickup, so what the heck have em done. 6 months later they were rusted about the same as when i brought them in. its the teen age kid doing the blasting that made the deal bad, if it aint clean metal you get no results. the other thing i do not like about powder coat wheels is wheels WILL get rock chips, no way around it. if its paint, and the blast was done right, and the primer is good, you will maybe get a chip down to primer that can be touched up, or if epoxy primer ignore it and it will take many years to get worse. if its powder coat, there is no primer, and every chip is right down to bare steel and the rust process starts before you get out of bed. i have wire wheels i painted 15 years ago that look very good compaired to the powder coat on my pickup. wire wheels use a lot of material, sand , paint and time due to all the air space between the the spokes, and all the different angles required to hit them all


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, April 01, 2015 - 11:36 pm:

I clamp an axle with hub to a tilting table. I paint the spokes first, from 4 angles, two each side. If you start at the valve hole you have a finish point so you don't lose count. While the wheel is still on the hub, one side of the drum, rim and wheel well can be done by rotating the wheel as you go. Then it can be turned around on the hub and the other side done.

I twitch a wire to a 1/2" washer, thread the wire through the valve hole and then hang the wheels to dry. That way I can do all 5 on end. The trick is to keep count of where you are up to so that you don't put on too much paint in places and make runs.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 01:09 am:

Years ago, my dad made up 5 wheel turners using BBQ spit motors to keep the wheels turning while spray painting. Numerous friends have borrowed my wheel turners over the years. BBQ spit motors were once available at swap meets or yard sales....not so easy to find today.
Two years ago, I finished a set of Bud wire wheels for our model T. The work involved in getting them ready for paint, cost of sand blast, primer and final paint was more expensive compared to having them powder coated.

When you have the wheels powder coated, part of the process that the coater does is blasting the wheels. Powder Coat is the best way to finish wire wheels. Also, the coating is more chip resistant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, April 02, 2015 - 01:10 am:

Allen's technique is very similar to mine, you have to count the spokes, and I start with the back side, final spraying on the front side The hub, then the rim last.
What I use for a fixture is a large bearing (get it cheap, for what we're doing a wore out one is fine, as long as it's a sealed bearing). I put a large bolt through the center, with a hole in it, this has a wire run through it, to hang it from a pipe in the air. Then I take a washer, that is just big enough to not fall through the hub cap hole, grind two sides flat, so they're smaller than the hub cap hole. I drill two small holes for short pins to stick out of that keep the wheel from falling off the washer. The inside of the washer needs to be as big as the outside of the bearing. Then take another, smaller washer that is a bit bigger than your bolt, weld it to the top of the hub holder washer, and press this on the bearing. With this assembly hanging from the pipe, you can lift a wheel (by holding the inside of the rim, where the tube goes)tip it sideways, and up through the washers, then set it down flat on the washers. You can now spin the wheel while you are painting it, and when you are done, you can CAREFULLY lift the wheel off the holder, take to the other end of the shop and set it on a large coffee can, and start painting the next wheel. By the time you've done one double-coat on all 5 wheels, you can start doing the second double-coat.
I'm not at home, or I'd post some pictures. I've done numerous sets of wheels this way--you do have to have good light underneath and above the wheel--and if you loose count of the spokes, UH OH!!
The wheel painting fixture takes up very little room when not in use too!


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