Stopping for the law with a trailer

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Stopping for the law with a trailer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:38 am:

I haul my 24' Wells trailer all over the northeast and stopped at a truck weigh station in NY once, they told me to get out. I have since just driven by the signs. Last year in VT I drove by one and was chased down by a trooper to inspect my trailer. What do most of you do about the truck stops, inspections, weigh station?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:50 am:

I don't know about other states, but here in California it's the towing vehicle that determines if you must stop at the weigh station. If your driving a pickup with a bed less than 9', and its GVW is less than 11,500 pounds and its unladen weight is less than 8,500 pounds you don't need to stop.

Of course, there are other variables that can complicate this seemingly simple formula. Also, I couldn't find anything about pulling a trailer. It all seems to hinge in the towing vehicle.

I hope this helps a little.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:53 am:

I just go right past them and have never been stopped or had a problem. I do have the 24" MTFCA sign on the rear and the 12" MTFCA sign on each side which might make a difference.

I wonder what "Freighter Jim" does? After all, he's a commercial carrier and travels all over the place.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 11:56 am:

Reflecting on what Henry said above, I tow either with our motorhome or with our Chev. Suburban & the Suburban has car plates.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

My pickup has commercial plate. All trucks in MA have commercial plates if they are 10k or more.
My truck is personal but weighs 10k so com plates. It is a 2012 Ford F350 with a 8' bed with a 24' Wells Cargo trailer rated at 10k also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 12:28 pm:

I never stop, even with my flat bed car hauler. In Arkansas I think it is one ton or larger that needs to stop. My car hauler is built on a 3/4 ton chassis. I even get by with the cheap car tags and license as 3/4 ton or smaller is car tag rate in Ark.. I was only pulled over once. It was in Missouri. I had passed a weight station on I-44 and the trooper wanted real bad to give me a ticket. But my Vin # and weight limit tags are for a 3/4 ton and it does not matter if it is single wheel or duals. He even made me weigh the load. A model T car will not go over the limit. A TT or Model A is over my 3/4 ton limit. Thank goodness I only had a Model T Roadster on the hauler that day, and the trailer was only 1/2 full of parts ..:-). At least that's how it was in Ark and Mo. ..... A note about my truck. It was originally a Dodge crew cab highway dept truck. They were built on a one ton chassis, but single wheels. Everything on the truck is one ton except the wheels and lug nuts are too short for duals. But the trucks were tagged, titled, and licensed as a 3/4 ton and have a higher GVW than a regular 3/4 ton. May have been some special government loophole ??. I just switched out the lug bolts and put duals on it and Im good to go. That truck will probably die with me... The wife has threatened to use it as my coffin and bury me in it some day... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

Decades ago in Califunny I used to have to drive to LA and back in a 1979 Toyota with a 10' stakebed and a dual wheel rear axle pulling a car trailer. If I drove the grapevine they didn't want me going through the scales. If we drove the toyo down 101 we had to go through the scales..go figure.
I think things are more uniform now, but the best tow vehicle for avoiding scales is a Suburban or Expedition as they are considered passenger cars. In fact in Calif if you tow a non RV trailer with a GVW over 11,500 pounds you need a commercial drivers license UNLESS you a towing with a "passenger car".
When Ford started putting the IH diesel in their pickups, contractors starting towing backhoes etc with them and they were easy prey for the CHP for a ticket for operating without the correct drivers license.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 01:16 pm:

There was a big thread last year on the AACA forum close to this subject. A guy from Conn was going to NC in his private 1ton Dually pulling his car on a single car flat trailer. He was stopped in PA by a Trooper and ticketed for no DOT #. Trooper said that since he could get a trophy for showing car, he was commercial. Fine was $500 I think. Thread got long about other people having same thing happen. It is just a money maker. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 01:33 pm:

IMHO, clearly there needs to be a line between pleasure/hobby kinds of use and true commercial use. The problem lies in the difficulty drawing a line that actually works and is immune from misuse. Furthermore, this problem is hugely exacerbated by the fact that there are 50 different state legislatures, each making their own set of rules.

I very strongly oppose more federal involvement in our lives, but this may be an example of a problem that could be reduced or even eliminated with federal standards. (Can't hardly believe I just said that!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

In Utah if your rig is a for hirer outfit, you have to go to the weight stations/ port of entry. If you are an RV or for personal haulage like an enclosed car trailer or truck with a trailer you do not. If you are an 18 wheeler for personal use you have to get inspected and weighed. Be prepared to have ownership papers and inspection certificates when you are asked to come in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

In Massachusetts, weigh stations are open so rarely that this isn't a worry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 02:35 pm:

the trick in any state is weather its for money or not. any time you are hauling somthing in your truck, and you own the car on the trailer, and no one is paying you to haul it, you are not a commercial vehicle and should not have to stop in any scale. even a load on the way to the swap meet, or a load on its way to the scrap yard technically makes you commercial, you are hauling goods for sale. problem is you will never get the same story from two different troopers. personally, i will drive hundreds of miles out of the way to avoid talking to the highway patrol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Lyon, PDX, OR. on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

In Oregon you don't stop unless you're more than 26000lbs and have commercial plates, Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 04:40 pm:

Keith,
I enjoyed the Freighter Jim remark. He's clearly a bandit hauler and the only thing that he knows about truck scales, is how to avoid them. When he posted his trailer for sale in the MTFCA Classifieds, he shared that he never had a title or registration for it. There's no way he's running a legit operation. If he can't even prove ownership of his equipment, he can't get a DOT inspection, which is required for commercial transport.

I hope our fellow hobbyists do their homework and insist on seeing his DOT number, IFTA sticker (International Fuel Tax Agreement; required for interstate transport) and proof of insurance before they trust him to haul their cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 04:42 pm:

Maybe this will help some.
http://drivinglaws.aaa.com/laws/weigh-stations/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele, Montana on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 04:53 pm:

Clayton I don't think the weather has anything to do with it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 05:08 pm:

I, too, think most states don't worry with trailers being pulled by one ton or less single rear wheel vehicles, unless they have a reason to suspect something is wrong or the trailer is beyond the towing rating for the towing vehicle. I have never towed with anything larger than a half ton pickup and a 16' trailer. Once in Louisiana or Mississippi, I voluntarily pulled into a weigh station and the operator waved me through like I was crazy for even thinking that I needed to pull in. I haven't stopped anywhere since.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 05:56 pm:

I was pulling a Farmall H on an open flat bed car trailer with an F-150 in FL a few years ago. There was an agricultural inspection station that said something to the effect of "All trucks, vans, pick-ups, and trailers had to stop". I dutifully, pulled in. I didn't know what to do. No one came outside. I got out of the truck and went inside. The officer inside was reading the paper and acted perturbed that I had bothered him. He told me I didn't have to stop, so on the return trip, I didn't bother, although I felt kinda weird ignoring the sign, as the sign was pretty clear about pick-up trucks having to stop.

I've said before that I'm glad I don't live where some of you live. I can't believe some of these horror stories I hear about the cops where some of you live. The fact that you could win a trophy makes you a commercial vehicle? Sounds like he's on a power trip. Probably some guy who used to get beat up in elementary school and now he's 'in command'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 07:27 pm:

john, was that cloudy or foggy information i gave?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dena & Dennis Gorder on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 10:04 pm:

We were coming back from Nebraska with our motor home and 25 foot enclosed trailer. As we entered Minnesota we cruised right by the weigh station and soon we were stopped by the State Patrol. We were forced to turn around and stop to get weighed. We did and then pulled in the back to talk to them. They said since our trailer had Bunny Hill Motorsports on the side they assumed it was a commercial trailer. We explained we are not a commercial vehicle and showed them the Model T in the trailer. For the next hour we talked to everyone working there about Ts. They told us we should stop at a the first Minnesota weigh station when we enter the state. Even if we took Bunny Hill off the side we should stop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, April 04, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

Here it is by state from:
http://drivinglaws.aaa.com/laws/weigh-stations/

Alabama

An officer may require the measuring or weighing of truck or trailer.

Measurement may be conducted by portable or stationary scales.

Officer may order truck or trailer to stationary scales if within a distance of 5 miles.

Alaska

Trucks over 10,000 lbs. GVWR are required to stop.
Arizona

Any commodity shipped into the state is subject to inspection for agricultural pests.

Gross weight fees apply to trailers and semitrailers with GVW of 10,000 lbs. or less; motor vehicles or vehicle combination if used primarily for transporting passengers for compensation; a hearse or ambulance or similar vehicle used in conduct of a mortician

Arkansas

The following vehicles must stop at weight/inspection stations: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, whether single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

California

Every driver of a commercial vehicle shall stop and submit the vehicle to an inspection of the size, weight, equipment, and smoke emissions of the vehicle at any location where members of the California Highway Patrol are conducting tests and inspections of commercial vehicles and when signs are displayed requiring the stop.

Colorado

Every owner or operator of a motor vehicle having a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of over 26,000 lbs. shall secure a valid clearance from an office of the DOR, from an officer of the Colorado State Patrol, or from a port of entry weigh station before operating such vehicle or combination of vehicles in the state.
Connecticut

All commercial motor vehicles are required to stop.

Delaware

The Secretary of the DPS may adopt such regulations and procedures as may be necessary for law enforcement weighing purposes.

District of Columbia
N/A.

Florida

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural, motor vehicles (including trailers) which are or could be used in the production, manufacture, storage, sale, or transportation of any food product or any agricultural, horticultural or live stock product, except private passenger automobiles with no trailer in tow, travel trailers, camping trailers, and motor homes; (2) any commercial vehicle (a) with a GWR of 10,000 lbs. or more, (b) designed to transport more than 10 passengers, or (c) used to transport hazardous materials.

Georgia

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; and (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Hawaii

Trucks over 10,000 lbs. GVWR must stop.
Idaho

10 fixed ports of entry, 10 roving units.

Illinois

A police officer may pull over any vehicle suspected of exceeding weight limits.

Indiana

All trucks with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 10,000 lbs. or more must stop.
Iowa

Any peace officer having reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful is authorized to require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the same by means of either portable or stationary scales and may require the vehicle to be driven to the nearest public scales. If the officer determines that the weight is unlawful, the officer may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place until such portion of the load is removed as may be necessary to reduce the GVW to the permitted limit.

All vehicles weighing over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

Kansas

All vehicles registered as trucks are required to stop at motor carrier safety and weight inspection stations when signs direct them to do so.

Any police officer having reason to believe that a vehicle or combination of vehicles is exceeding the legal weight limit may require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the vehicle by means of either portable or stationary scales.

Kentucky

Vehicles transporting agricultural products and all commercial vehicles with GVW rating of 10,000 lbs. or more must stop.

Louisiana

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Maine

On direction of a state police officer or at a designated weigh point an operator must drive the vehicle onto the scales for weighing and permit examination of registration certificate and the load.

Maryland

The Department of State Police maintains 7 vehicle weighing and measuring stations, with 1 station on Interstate 95.

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles over 10,000 lbs.; (2) all commercial vehicles over 10,000 lbs.; (3) commercial buses carrying over 16 passengers; (4) any hazardous material haulers requiring placards.

Massachusetts

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Michigan

The following vehicles must stop: (1) vehicles with dual rear wheels transporting agricultural products; (2) trucks over 10,000 lbs. with dual rear wheels and/or towing construction equipment; (3) all tractor/semitrailer combination vehicles.

Minnesota

All vehicles with a GVW rating in excess of 10,000 lbs. must stop.

Mississippi

The State Tax Commission, tax collectors, highway patrol, or another authorized enforcement officer, shall have a right to weigh or have weighed any vehicle to ascertain the accuracy of registration.

Missouri

All commercial trucks licensed with a GVWR of over 18,000 lbs. must stop.

Montana

Vehicles transporting agricultural products and trucks with a GVW of 8,000 lbs. or more and new or used RVs being transported to a distributor or dealer must stop.
Nebraska

All trucks over 1 ton must stop, except a pickup truck pulling a recreational trailer.

Nevada

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles either in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; and, (3) commercial trucks with a GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

New Hampshire

The driver of every motor vehicle shall, upon request of any law enforcement officer, stop and submit such to a weighing of said motor vehicle by means of either portable or stationary scales. If such scales are not available at the place where the stopping occurs, upon request of a law enforcement officer, the driver shall drive said motor vehicle to the nearest public scales provided the distance to the public scales does not exceed 10 miles.

New Jersey

New Jersey requires all vehicles that weigh 10,001 lbs or more to weigh.

New Mexico

Trucks with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or more must stop.

New York

State has fixed inspection/weigh stations along with random enforcement through use of portable units.

North Carolina

The DOT operates between 6 and 13 permanent weighing stations.

A law enforcement officer may stop and weigh a vehicle to determine if the vehicle’s weight is in compliance with the vehicle’s declared gross weight and weight limits.

North Dakota

All vehicles with a GVWR in excess of 10,000 lbs. must stop. Exception: recreational vehicles used for personal, recreational purposes.

Ohio

All commercial vehicles over 5 tons (10,000 lbs) are required to cross the scales if the weigh station is open in Ohio.

Oklahoma

Any officer of DPS, the Oklahoma Tax Commission, or any sheriff is authorized to stop any vehicle in order to weigh the vehicle with portable or stationary scales.

Oregon

All vehicles or combination of vehicles weighing 26,000 lbs. must stop.
Pennsylvania

Regardless of size, the following vehicles are subject to inspection and weigh station examinations: (1) agriculture vehicles when using public highways; (2) passenger and specialty vehicles towing large trailers; (3) large recreational vehicles, and (4) trucks.

Rhode Island

Agricultural vehicles and trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

South Carolina

If the Department has reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful, it may require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the vehicle and load either by means of portable or stationary scales and may require that the vehicle be driven to the nearest public scales.

Whenever an officer upon weighing a vehicle and load determines that the weight is unlawful, he may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place and remain standing until the portion of the load necessary to reduce the axle weight, or gross weight of the vehicle, or both, is removed.

All material unloaded must be cared for by the owner or operator of the vehicle at his own risk. The scaled weights of the gross weight of vehicles and combinations of vehicles cannot be closer than 10% to the true gross weight.

South Dakota

The following trucks must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles with a GVW rating over 8,000 lbs.; (2) trucks over 8,000 lbs.; (3) drive-away operations in excess of 8,000 lbs. GVW rating.

Tennessee

Placed statewide, checking federal and state restrictions related to size and weight, safety, and drivers regulations.

Texas

All commercial vehicles must stop when directed by sign or police officer.

Utah

Any peace officer having reason to believe that the height, width, length, or weight of a vehicle and its load is unlawful may require the operator to stop the vehicle and submit to a measurement or weighing of the vehicle and load. A peace officer may require the vehicle to be driven to the nearest scales or port-of-entry within 3 miles.

Vermont

Any uniformed police officer, having reason to believe that the weight of the vehicle and load is unlawful, may stop such motor vehicles up to one hour for the purpose of determining the weight of said vehicle and load. If the operator does not wish to submit to the weighing of such vehicle and load by means of portable scales he or she may demand that such vehicle be weighed at the nearest public scales reasonably available, however, if public scales are not reasonably available, the officer may require the vehicle to be weighed on portable scales.

Virginia

Trucks must stop if their registered gross weight exceeds 7,500 lbs.

Washington

Agricultural vehicles and trucks with a GVWR over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

West Virginia

A police officer or motor carrier safety enforcement officer may require that the driver of a vehicle or combination of vehicles stop and submit to a weighing with a portable or stationary weighing device, or to drive to the nearest weighing station if within a distance of 2 miles from where vehicle is stopped.

Wisconsin

Trucks over 8,000 pounds gross vehicle weight must stop.

Wyoming

Trucks are required to stop when instructed by a regulatory sign (black letters on a white background) or a police officer. Trucks and drivers are chosen for inspection on a random basis.

All oversize and overweight (150,000 lbs. or more) loads must have a permit in hand, or permission to enter the state in order to purchase a permit, before entering Wyoming or operating on Wyoming roads.

Puerto Rico

Every heavy motor vehicle that travels on the highways of Puerto Rico shall follow the instructions of the traffic signs and signals related or associated to the weighing process of trucks in the permanent weighing stations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 12:22 am:

thats a good posting Jim, but its just not that simple. federal ICC law (interstate commerce commission) is that less than 26,000 lbs is the max for any private carrier to be able to go without a dot number, and be exempt from ICC rules. thats a good law, but many states put there own number on the scale signs, when really they should go by the feds rule. i'm in minnesota, and in iowa, i'm quite sure, and you iowa guys correct me if wrong, but i think iowa scales say anything over 6000 pull into the scale. thats a 3/4 ton 4wd pickup with one bale of hay in the back!!!!!!. i am always amazed when i see that. idaho, was always 26,000 like it should be every where, at least years ago when i traveled around more. interesting list, lets hear more from the folks that live there as to its accuracy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 12:30 am:

one more little side note, i never go any where without a truckers atlas. they show where all the scales are, and have more city maps, and have more mileage maps, and i just last week updated to a 2013 rand macnally truckers atlas on ebay for 4 bucks, with 4 dollar shipping. every one who travels should have one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 08:43 am:

Bottom Line: When are the states going to start
working for the same company?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 09:50 am:

So here's a interesting question, not to stir up any trouble but,

If Freighter Jim does not have the required permits, Dot numbers required for operating a commercial vehicle, Fed fuel sticker and no inspections, one would assume he has no commercial carrier insurance as well.

So if you hire him to haul your car he becomes a commercial entity by the definition of federal law. If there is a loss or claim, and he does not carry commercial carriers insurance coverage, who is going to pay you for your loss?

Your insurance carrier will likely pay you, but then they will go after the "operator" of the illegal interstate hauler meaning freighter jim.

I can see this being a real can of worms with insurance companies fighting each other and you the insured holding the bag while the fight is on.

On a similar note people delivering pizza with their own cars for hire, are forced by the pizza chains to purchase a commercial rider to cover the possible liability.

Now lets take the deep pockets approach. If you hire an illegal hauler and he does not carry the required insurances and does not have the required inspections and permits, and has a catastrophic accident, guess who will be looked at. The guy with the priceless antique car who must have deep pockets, yep you the car owner.

In our business we operate slide bed tow trucks, we as of a couple of years ago were required by federal law to register our trucks and have in plain site our required DOT number. We also must carry registration papers including insurance documents at all times. We also are required to carry a minimum 1 million dollar of insurance coverage. Federal law now requires proof of federal DOT registration before you can license or relicense your commercial vehicle. One more instance of buyer beware !!!!!



just sayin'

brasscarguy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 10:43 am:

i'm surprised we have not heard from freighter jim here. i have to bet he is all dot legal as it would be impossible now days to be on the road every day without playing by the rules.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 11:32 am:

I have an unmarked E-250 and a 20' trailer also UN-adorned. I do not stop at weigh stations and have never been chased down. I do stop at agricultural inspection sites because I was chased down for passing one (fruit fly season) and had to let the officer look inside the trailer. When he saw my tool boxes and the model "T" he laughed and said next time just drive through at 45 mph most times they will motion you through when they see the dog you travel with (the 65 pound lab/pit mix).:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By EDGAR R MINNIE II on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 11:33 am:

I live in Mass and have driven 45 states in the last two years. I use a F 350 Dually with a 34 foot plain white enclosed trailer. No markings anywhere on the truck or trailer. I do not have a DOT number, or a medical card. I have never stopped at a weigh station in any state. I was stopped once in Vermont for bypassing a weight station. State cop had an attitude. I explained a private citizen doesn't have to stop as long as the use not for commercial gain as written in the Federal DOT rules and regs. He wanted to play 10,000 questions to see if he could trip me up. Asked me to open the trailer so he could look inside. I said no. Asked me where I was going, I said no comment. He kept me on the side of the road for about half an hour. He wanted to test my break away on my trailer and proceeded to try and activate it. I told him hands off my property. I would activate it for him. I explained I have a copy of the federal laws in the trailer with my registration, and he could read them if he liked. Long story short, I went on my way. BUT you better be sure to have good equipment if you take this attitude with them. Mostly I just explain it's my truck, trailer, and car in the box. I'm on vacation. And I just go on my way. The trick is once you get off the federal highway, then you must comply with all the crazy state regulations. Last year on the way to Hershey I was stopped at 4 am in Connecticut by the DOT. Guy was a jerk, but after the inspection I went on my way. Today the fines handed out are so steep it's easier to try and comply with the regs. By the way, I register my trailers in Maine and save hundreds of dollars every year beating my state out of their rip off registration fees. None of the Mass State cops have managed to ticket me for it yet. The registration fees here are so stupid high, it's still cheaper to get two tickets for the registration violation than to pay the state their money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 02:07 pm:

I just happened on this thread.

Because I have been in Howards' home & I respect him ....

I am compliant & insured - if I was not I could not drive down the road.

I stopped in Nebraska & Iowa on this trip at (4) weigh stations and had my paperwork inspected at one and my rig inspected at another.

Regarding the OP original question:

With shrinking budgets - some states are turning to the road for additional revenue and issuing violations to motorists passing thru
that do not result in points against a drivers license but will generate revenue because most folks will not return to fight a ticket.

If in doubt - stop at a weigh station.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

Jim,

I was only offering an opinion regarding Eric Hylands post that you did not have legal title or license for the trailer you were offering. I assumed that this was the trailer you were hiring out to transport vehicles around the country. If I was in error I sincerely apologise.



In Washington State the rules of title, insurance and DOT for commercial vehicles are very strict. I know from experience with shade tree tow operators that do not have DOT and state required insurance. The state patrol commercial division is quite keen to inspect and site those that do not comply. Interesting now the fine is the exact amount of the fee's plus you still have to pay the fees so its like double taxation.

I estimate the actual cost per tow truck for all required permits, inspections DOT and insurance is upwards of $2000 per year. We are required to provide proof of ownership and insurance before the trucks can be licensed for the next operating year. The same is true for commercial trailers for hire as well. I agree now the various police agencies are nothing more than revenue agents looking for any dollars they can produce. In my day the saying was " a ticket a day keeps the chief away" Now its more like 2-3 per day.

Sorry for this misunderstanding,



brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 04:03 pm:

I have never been stopped for passing a weigh station but I have been stopped on the road for a safety inspection in Florida. They are bullsh...t stops to raise revenue. They ask to see your safety equipment that they assume most people don't have as required under Florida law. It's stuff like flares and reflectors that you are supposed to put out if you are disabled. I pull an unmarked trailer with a Ford Expedition. Fortunately, I have all the required stuff but it kinda pissed the trooper off that he couldn't find any reason to make me contribute to his retirement fund.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 05:17 pm:

Jim,
End the speculation. Post a verifiable DOT number.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 09:07 pm:

If you are a NY resident and register your trailer in Maine, you can be stopped and ticketed. A friend of mine is a cop and does ticket people for this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 09:14 pm:

Yes Dan, I have heard they are starting to crack down on this. I just pay the piper, and do it in NY. It is a lot easier to explain if you get pulled over having a truck and trailer registered both in NY in your name I feel anyhow. I have never stopped for any weigh station nor been chased down, and have been through PA NY and NJ. Maybe just lucky? I do have an open trailer though, so maybe that helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, April 05, 2015 - 10:25 pm:

this thread is still going, we have sorta got off track, but i have an entertaining story that fits. long tale, get a beverage, and be comfortable. i hauled junk all my life with a way over loaded 1 ton roll back. the truck was beefed up so it would haul double what it was built for, but you could not stop, and you were going to jail if caught. so i upgraded to a 26,000lb flatbed with air brakes so i wouldnt kill somebody when they pullout in front of you. great truck, lots of happy hauling of "precious" goods, but now the next problem is all the scales and troopers think i am a commercial carrier. i'm not, i am licensed for 25,999, but i look commercial. one trip took me to california. in cal, you can not enter the state without a current year inspection sticker. i dont mean your home state, i mean every new truck that enters ca gets inspected. well.i am not commercial, so i should be exempt, but i dont like to fight so i found a goat path to enter the state, get my junk and get out asap. next stop white sulpher springs montana where i had bought 2 WWII army tanks cut in half! i had a semi haul the big parts, and i hauled a couple trips of tracks and other loose parts. during the trip, my air dryer started to pop off about every 3 miles instead of every hour, and at the time i knew little about them so i stopped at a truck repair place for advice. they said as long as you are still holding air in the gauge, you will make it home, and rebuild the governor then. so...stop yawning, i'm just gettin to the good part, so at the south dakota border they had a roadside spot check going on. the trooper waves me in and first thing he is looking for my current year commercial vehicle inspection sticker on the windshield, i dont have one. why? he asks?, because i am not commercial. "let me see your log book", i dont need one, i am not commercial. "let me see your bill of lading', dont have one. all this time, my air drier is blowin off every 3 minutes. next he wants to argue that i am commercial because i have crossed state lines. not true, so i show him the paper that comes with my registration every year, and those of you that own a one ton or larger know that every year the registration contains a small pamphlet from the ICC that tells you if you are in the business of interstate commerce you need to apply for a DOT number. on the back, it has a short list of the definitions of words, one is "interstate-to cross state lines".so i show him this paper, and he points to the definition and says, see, here, you need a dot number! . so the whole thing took 45 minutes, my air drier blowin off the whole time, and he should have put me out of service for that, but was too busy trying to prove me wrong. i got 4 warning tickets, log book, freight bills, inspection sticker, and dot number. when i got home i called the information number on the paper and told them the story.nobody really knew what to say, except "why dont you get a dot number"! well, i don t want a dot number, i am not commercial, its my stuff i haul. so, they then said call this number, and put me thru to the ICC in washington!! i told him the story, and he said NO, NONE OF THOSE LAWS APPLY TO YOU. and, he said if you ever have that trouble again, have the trooper call me. next, i wrote the state of south dakota and told them the story. about a week later i got a call from the head state cop who told me i was correct, none of these laws apply to me, the trooper on the scene has been informed, and i should feel free to cross south dakota any time i wish!!!. so that all amkes you fell bubbly inside, i got a secrete phone number for washington, and permission to drive, but you know darn well the next time it happens it will be a repeat of the last. i have since sold the big truck and just overload a trailer like a normal person. i'm done, wake up!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 09:32 am:

Question: What were you going to do with the tank? Cut it up for scrap, or weld it back together for a display. If it was for scrap and you intended to sell the scrap, you were/are commercial. Whether you own the scrap has nothing to do with it being commercial.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 09:42 am:

Fred has a good point. In the AACA thread the Cop's point was that the guy COULD win a prize, therefore he was a commercial vehicle. Not saying it is right, just that is the way the Man is looking at it. In these stories, is seems it is always an out of state vehicle that is stopped. Wonder why??? Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 10:54 am:

Fred, i was going to try to make a tank put of it. every growing boy wants a tank!!. so , yes, at some point years down the road i expected to, and did, make money. if you take the law further it would mean that if you buy a new lawn mower, you must throw your old one in the trash.dont sell it, and dont scrap it(recycling?)or you are now in the lawn mower business and should have a dot number on your minivan when you pick up your new mower. that cop was all wound up because i had no receipts for any thing on board. well in most places i shop you dont get a receipt. swap meets, junk yards, craigs list, etc. i wanted to ask to see a receipt for his shoes and socks, but remained pleasant instead. like i said before, i'll drive a long ways out of my way to avoid talking to any of those guys


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 01:32 pm:

Howard,

In Ohio - if the GAWR or empty weight of a trailer is 4000 pounds or less - a title is not issued.

It does not matter what the GVWR of the trailer is.

Even if you go to title a trailer from another state where it had a title - they will not issue you one if the GAWR is less than 4000 pounds.

They only issue a registration.

If my trailer had no registration - it would have no plate - if it had no plate - I could not be on the road.

Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Monday, April 06, 2015 - 04:56 pm:

howard??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 12:49 am:

Clayton,

" Howard " is aka " brass car guy " ...



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By doug hauge upstate NY stittville 13469 on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 10:08 am:

this is my rig. 1 T one the back of the truck and the 2nd T in the back of the 40ft toy hauler


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 10:55 pm:

For all you guys in Ontario....I just got pinched today for not having a yellow inspection sticker on my truck. I have been past countless scales, over the border, etc and have not had an issue. I have the yellow inspection sticker on my trailer (16 foot enclosed), but didn't think I needed one on my truck, because it is personal use only and I am under 10,000 lbs. 240 dollar fine later, I now know that they check ALL trucks, 1/2 tons too for that sticker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike mclean pefferlaw ontario canada on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 07:32 am:

hi greg your lucky you don't live up here is see them set up every day I am out they are pulling over every trailer even boat trailer I still see so many with out the sticker one guyhad the sticker but it was in the glove box to cold to put it on 500 buck later he has the sticker now and many more stories of puling the plates of the trailer mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 01:00 pm:

Is this yellow sticker just for Ontario residents or
for anybody that pulls a trailer?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike mclean pefferlaw ontario canada on Monday, April 13, 2015 - 03:18 pm:

I know it s Ontario if truck and trailer are over 10,ooo lbs not sure about the rest of Canada


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Georgetown Ontario Canada on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 07:40 pm:

Mike the big issue I think is that it is very confusing when looking for info on who needs a yearly inspection sticker and who doesn't. MTO told me as long I was under 10,000 lbs. I didn't need a sticker. OPP that charged me says I do. Bottom line is that if you pull a trailer in Ontario, just get a sticker on your truck and trailer. Also check your ownership for the weight - they license all 1/2 ton trucks as max 3000kg unless you tell them different. That weight needs to be increased to keep you legal while pulling any decent sized trailer. Scary part is travel trailers are exempt. They don't need yearly inspections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike mclean pefferlaw ontario canada on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 11:25 pm:

yes you are right greg we have a guy in our car that is on the mto board he did a talk 10,000 lbs and over and the tie downs all have to be right and I think there is some thing about a date on strapes has to be up to date and in good working order


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 11:37 pm:

just leave the trailer at home and you leave your troubles behind. this one went to glaslin saskatchewan last week


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 11:42 pm:

2nd time now....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 09:52 pm:

i went thru nebraska today, the sign at the scale there reads "all trucks and pickups with trailer must weigh" every state has their own BS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 10:24 pm:

This has been a very interesting thread
I pull with 2 different vehicles. One is a F250 "super duty " and the Ford rating is plenty for what I tow
The other is WAY different; a '65 Hayes highway tractor converted to a motorhome. It is now single rear axle. Licensed as a motorhome with essentially passenger car plates. I built it and needed it inspected when it was finished to satisfy the insurance company. I have a Class 1 license ( equivalent to a CDL) which at my age means a annual medical and renewal. And I have airbrake endorsement
I had considered down grading to avoid the annual renewal etc.
I have never crossed a scale in 13 years of driving it and never been hassled either. Maybe I've just been lucky
I've been up and down I15 and east to Minisota and west to the coast


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, April 17, 2015 - 10:29 pm:

Greg, sorry to hear about your ticket. The corrupt OPP are using every excuse they can to steal money from the very taxpayers that support them in order to sustain their "sunshine list" wages and to buy every tactical toy they don't need. The MTO are in on the scam too. My trailer is a single axle and I'm told that exempts it from a sticker. My truck, trailer and car weigh a total of 8300 lbs, so hopefully I'm safe there too. I heard a story about the scummy MTO preying on an unknowledgeable woman who was sent to town by her husband in a dually pickup. They knew she had no clue about the sticker. Our civil servants think they are the masters. Once in a while the public shows them otherwise.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration