Screw It!!!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Screw It!!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 02:25 pm:



Tedious jobs give us too much time to think. Wondering if we should use our "treasured" slotted screws where they don't show instead of Phillips.

I get a little angry when the heads are off-center or when the slots aren't deep enough and I have to hack saw them deeper. And then there are the real odd-balls that show up.





It is nice that this project doesn't require the care and precision of other cars I have done. And it's good that we don't have more important things to worry about.



I like using these #6 screws to replace the spot welds. The arrow shows one ground down. Also I found that a 3" putty knife and a rubber mallet work well for breaking the spot welded seams.

Anyone have some good "Screw" Stories?

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 05:14 pm:

Well, there was this time I was in Calcutta and I met this.... never mind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 05:49 pm:

Weird looking screws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 05:57 pm:

Richard, on my 21 Touring rebuild I used slot head screws BUT they were machine screws and about 1/4 longer than necessary to allow them to go through the tack strips so I use could use nuts to secure them. That may seem non authentic for some folks.
The strips get covered up anyway by the upholstery.
I did the same thing to attach one side of the sections of the 5 piece back that you did.

I drilled out a few of the spot welds, used the countersunk head screws and carefully smoothed down the area and filled the slot with a small bit of( HORRORS!! ) bondo.

You cant see the repair and after priming and painting the body nobody knows but me! And yes I do sleep at night and don't worry about it because its not pure!

But nobody knows but me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 06:41 pm:

Richard: On the pitting n the back, what are you going to use to cover that? Lead or ??????????

Bill d


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 08:19 pm:

I would put a layer of fiberglass cloth inside, then fill as best I could with epoxy and add a little bondo to make it pretty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

Ah Yes......Calcutta.......

I will be using Bondo on the pitted area. I will get it as clean as possible and let it oose through the holes. I have had great luck with Bondo. I even have made radiator caps, door handles and an ignition switch with it. I hate to recommend it but has worked well for me. I have not learned to braze, solder or lead well and often warp the metal. It's just a hobby and this is a fun car, not a restoration.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 07, 2015 - 09:47 pm:

This shows the method for casting the '25 door handles and the '23 White Bus radiator cap I cast in Bondo. The handles have worked fine for 14 years and the Cap on the Bus has survived since 1998. The heat from the radiator hasn't bothered it but the enamel paint is wearing on the edges.

I would encourage anyone to find better products or methods but this does work so far.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 12:00 pm:

Good as New!!! :0)



I forgot how bad some of these panels were.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/480687.html?1411349997

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 12:26 pm:

Here's an original one that came out of my roof. This one took a special screw driver called a 'hammer' to put in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 01:11 pm:

Later that same day.....



That's a strange one Justin. Were there others like it?

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Saturday, April 11, 2015 - 01:35 pm:

Nope, that was the only one. I slotted it to put it back in but it had to have been hammered in. I wonder if that was the standard practice on all screws that were put in to save production time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Fenton on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 07:15 am:

Many years ago I was struggling to drive some long screws when a retired cabinet maker offered to help me. He just took a hammer and drove the screws in. I asked him what he thought those threads were for on the screws. He replied that "that's for taking them out!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 09:59 am:

I'd recommend Quik Poly to make such things as those door handles and radiator cap....coat the form/mold with a release agent, pour in the Quik Poly, and 30 minutes later (less, actually) have a solid machinable copy....no, I don't own stock in QP but it's a really good product for soaking into weak wood, and works equally well to cast small parts...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 02:05 pm:

It is probably much better than Bondo. What is the shelf life? I have bought liquid plastic casting resin 3 times on sale and by the time I got around to using it it had hardened in the can (maybe a year or more). That's when I return to my 12 year old gallon of Bondo. I'm sure there are several good casting agents.

Thanks

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 02:39 pm:

QP is great stuff, but be ready to pour, 'cause once the chemicals start reacting, it sets in a hurry! I used it to tighten up the wood on my 14 and it worked great. Sorry Richard, I cannot speak to shelf like, but like other products, I store it upside down.Never thought of it as a casting agent. Will have to try that. Regards to all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 02:51 pm:

Richard, wire brush the pitted area to bare steel, apply 3M aluminum adhesive backing tape to the rear of the pitting holes, and apply a few swipes of filler from the front, sand smooth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, April 12, 2015 - 09:14 pm:

Thanks for the good ideas. I used a Polycarbide Abrasive Wheel to remove the rust and then a grinder to give the metal some "tooth". Where the bondo oosed through I blended it lightly to hold from that side. I like the tape idea. I sometimes use strapping tape over the tack strips to help them stay together.

Rich


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