Plumbers tape on replacement petcock

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Plumbers tape on replacement petcock
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 02:22 pm:

Dumb question. Replacing the petcock on the radiator. Do you use plumbers tape/putty on the threads?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 04:58 pm:

What ever is handy. Most times just a snot of gasket sealer. Dang tape always rides up and gets in the tiny drain hole. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 05:41 pm:

I don't like the tape. I used the white Permatex thread sealer on mine just last week and all is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 06:25 pm:

Permatex is my choice as well- smells interesting as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JD, Wichita, KS on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 09:24 pm:

Indian Head


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 11:16 pm:

Rector-seal, No. 4.
(Old Steam guy, no Teflon allowed around steam--the Teflon, if any is in the 'slipstream', travels and messes up the steam valves.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 07:47 am:

My vote Permatex non-hardening #2 doesn’t seize!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 10:37 am:

John,

If we add up all the suggestions and take the average answer, I'd say the cumulative answer is "use something".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 11:20 am:

I always thought this was plumber's tape...I guess modern materials has now included teflon tape, etc. as plumber's tape.

tape


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:06 pm:

That is called "Hanger Strap", John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:09 pm:

Holy Tape, John, the Riddler has us again!!


You are probably right, Teflon Tape falls under Pipe Dope.
OH, guess we've been doped again. . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:29 pm:

I use nothing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

P. Jamieson,
Guess I am too old...or live out West...but I was confused when I saw the title of this thread. Originally it was called *plumber's tape*..look it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 12:53 pm:

I'm with John. Plumbers tape is galvanized steel with many holes, used to hang pipes under houses where the spiders reside. Teflon tape is what one wraps around threaded pipe joints.

I use pipe dope on the radiator petcock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 07:32 am:

I thought "Plumber's Tape" was what a plumber put on his backside before he bent over to repair the drain in the kitchen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 07:41 am:

I gotta admit, John. That was my first thought too. Must not be just a western thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 04:38 pm:

I thought the item in the picture was called mechanics roll...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 05:03 pm:

Eric, Never heard of "Mechanics Roll". Stuff sure is handy whatever it's called. Right up there with Duct Tape. Good for a hundred purposes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 11:09 pm:

If you live in Oregon it is called "Duck Tape".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 10:15 am:

Back to the original question: "Replacing the petcock on the radiator. Do you use plumbers tape/putty on the threads?"

I was taught that brass in steel or steel in brass, no tape or pipe dope needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 11:43 am:

As I stated, I like to use Rector Seal #4, I do not use teflon, just in case some gets loose in the oil and wrecks havoc on bearings, etc. However, any good plumber's sealer will work. Yes, brass/steel will usually not require sealer, but that's not a good reason to NOT use it, think of it as insurance and a help to the one who follows you and has to take it apart (and that might be you!)
Plumber's Tape, Mechanic's wire, and Duct (duck) Tape are all up at the top of the list of necessary items for "Jerry-rigging."
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 11:58 am:

If the tap/die was done with an NPT thread system tool, it needs sealant or it will wick along the base line of the thread...

If the tap/die was done with an NPTF thread system tool, it does NOT need sealant as the threads are of a slightly different form and actually do 'crush' with zero clearance as the taper is made up.

Since nobody ever marks anything right, then goop/tape should be used at all times and then you know for sure that it will not leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 12:04 pm:

Amen to that Ken Todd!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

How about people who use it on flare fittings and compression fittings? I don't get that. We bought a new fridge from Lowes. When they delivered it, they started to put thread tape on the compression fitting for the ice maker line. I told him not to. He said he HAD to or else they weren't responsible if it leaked. Whatever. I don't guess it hurts anything, as long as it's JUST on the threads and doesn't get into the ferrule area, but WHY?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 12:24 pm:

Hal
the answer to your question is -
People don't know what they don't know!


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