Plagued by mildew (26 Touring)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Plagued by mildew (26 Touring)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James R. Booth, DeRidder, LA on Monday, April 27, 2015 - 08:03 pm:

I recently (last summer) put a new top on my 26 touring. Within a month it started to mildew. When the mildew is visible I have been treating it with Lysol spray which temporarily eliminates the problem but it soon returns. I live in Louisiana (hot and humid temperature). My garage is unheated but I have been leaving a plant grow bulb in the car.
Has anyone else had the problem? Any ideas for solving it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, April 27, 2015 - 08:39 pm:

I had a problem like that and found that you have to find the source of the mildew that is reinfecting the top. I would cure the mildew on the top by letting it sit out in the sun but it would come back because there was mildew on some tires I had in the same garage. Once I cured the mildew on the tires and the top at the same time the problem stopped. I also found that running a fan on low helped to keep the dampness down by circulating the air


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson on Monday, April 27, 2015 - 09:34 pm:

I am in the midwest we dont have much mildew here but I have dryed out cars by puting a dehumidifier in them. like val says a small fan would probley work


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, April 27, 2015 - 11:40 pm:

Bleach kills mildew at its' source. Of course you can't put bleach on the upholstery or it will take the color out, but there may be another way. I once had an air conditioner technician clean out the mildew in my ductwork with a contraption that he mounted in the air intake which pulled the bleach fumes in and blew them through the system of ducts. I could tell it was bleach because you could smell a bleach smell at each vent. Do you think you could use the same concept to rid your car of mildew, such as open the doors of your car and boil a solution of bleach in a pan over a hot plate and with a fan, blow the bleach fumes through the car? Or put some bleach in an old fashioned steam humidifier in the car and allow the steam to permeate throughout the car and see it that won't kill the mildew at its' source. Just a thought. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 12:29 am:

Has anyone else had the problem? Any ideas for solving it?

Yes, .... I lived in Seattle.

Yes, .... I moved to the desert.

Problem solved, problem stays solved. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 08:24 am:

I have used Wet and Forget on vinyl siding. http://www.walmart.com/search/search-ng.do?search_query=Wet+N+Forget&adid=222222 22224211448826&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=3891514051&wl1=e&wl2=%22wet%20and%20forge t%22&wl3=15156082824&veh=sem You could test an our of sight spot or piece of material to see how it reacts. Results are not instant but occur over time and it leaves a barrier that is resistant to mild and mildew.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 08:33 am:

Place a couple containers of damp rid in the car it is available at home despot or ace or lowes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 08:40 am:

You need to treat the source of the mildew. If your garage is damp then you need to find a way to dry it out some. You need to kill the mildew that is not only in the car but in the garage also. Perhaps a mild bleach solution in a garden sprayer to spray the walls, rafters, and floor of the garage. Look for items stored in your garage that hold moisture and remove them or treat them with mildew killer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Carlton on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 11:43 am:

Here in Ohio, I've noticed that the temperature swings and condensation are the cause.

I have a large pole barn at home that is un-insulated. If the temperature rises 20 degrees in a short amount of time, everything sweats immediately until the temps inside and outside equalize. Then things dry up. Shop equipment constantly flash rusts but generally no mildew.

I also have a large insulated commercial pole barn with sheet metal inside and out. When left unheated, it may take much longer for the condensation to develop, but when it does, it stays A LOT longer because it cannot equalize with the outside air very well. I have a real mildew problem. I had an entire boat that I thought would be safe almost ruined because of mildew.

I also have a large 1920's brick building with an unheated, uncooled, walk out basement and 12" walls. There is never, ever a mildew or moisture problem and the foundation is built on a large creek. Meaning, the water runs on the outside of the foundation.

It's been very interesting for me to notice the differences, and also very, very frustrating to chase all of my tools and equipment with oil!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 11:55 am:

I don't believe you will stop it until you set up some means of continually reducing the humidity levels in your garage. I would suggest investing in a good dehumidifier and piping the drain out through a wall unless you are prepared to empty the tank every couple of days. Gardeners refer to this area as the tropical South for a reason! An ion generator helps also but more troublesome for long term use from my experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:09 pm:

Complaining about the heat and humidity of the Gulf Coast is
on par with me complaining about the snow in Spokane or the
rain in Seattle. It comes with the territory.

As my ex used to say, "#@!, or get off the pot"

I left Seattle after wasting 30 years in that dark swamp. I don't
complain about the snow in Spokane. I just deal with it as part of
the high desert package that I CHOOSE to live in. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James R. Booth, DeRidder, LA on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 08:05 pm:

Thanks all for your input. I have decided to try a combination of your suggestions. Since I cannot pack up and leave LA, I will:
1. Install a gas (propane) heater to dry out the air.
2. Put a small box fan in the back seat blowing onto the rear curtain.
3. Check out "Wet and Forget"
4. Get some "Damp Rid" for inside the car.
5. Spray bleach on walls and floor inside garage.
Dehumidifier will come later if necessary - Jim, I believe I will save your idea until all else fails. Will let you all know results in a later post. Thanks again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

James,

Are you new to DeRidder?
I am a little west and south of you but we get close to the same amount of rain y'all do.

I do not have mildew in my T shop but only because I "manage" the relative humidity (RH).

I have a complete air-conditioning system but running that all the time is expensive and also not necessary to control mildew.

We are in the tropics and if you want to "manage" the RH:

1. Seal the garage doors and insulate them. I am only talking about the rubber seals around the overhead doors (I assume you have those kind).

2. Insulate the garage door(s) itself and walls. You want to keep the daytime temperature of the garage down because the hotter the air is, the more water vapor it can contain.

3. Mount a half ton A/C, 110 volt window unit, (I am assuming you have a two-car garage) in the garage wall or a window because it does the same thing as a dehumidifier but better.

4. Get a thermometer setup for your shop from Walmart that shows the temp and humidity so you only run the A/C when necessary. Keep the RH at or below 60% most of the time and your problem should go away.

The plus to the little A/C units is that you can also work on your T some and it will not be so uncomfortable during our summer months. Two birds with one stone.

60% RH is on the edge of the mold/mildew problem.

I have a large, well insulated shop/garage and seldom run the A/C system. My trick is to "open up" during the low RH periods and keep the space closed during high RH periods. We are forecast to have 39% RH tonight!

I drove my '14 to the office today. When I get home this afternoon, I will leave the main door open for a couple of hours and soak up some Arizona/New Mexico Damp Rid that arrived last night.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 01:23 pm:

There are certain advantages to living in the tropics, but like anywhere, it comes
with some inconveniences. All I was saying was enjoy the good, deal with the bad,
and if the bad outweighs the good, THEN maybe a relocation is worth considering.

I remember the day this concept hit me like a freight train. Had never entered my
pea brain before. And then suddenly ... WHY DO YOU LIVE HERE ???

I sold a bunch of stuff, transitioned my business, and within a year was gone. Best
decision I ever made. Only wish I had not taken 30 years to come to it !


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