Terribly OT More Rich Eagle Philosophy. (Don't Read if you were offended before.)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Terribly OT More Rich Eagle Philosophy. (Don't Read if you were offended before.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 01:43 pm:

This may be good bye. Maybe not. I have strayed from the Model T world before and came back. I have mentioned a Flathead Engine I received the other day. A 1935 has been gathering dust and spare parts for 40 years.
Sometimes it is hard to relate to the real world from the sanctity of my cluttered shop. More so when you have been cleaning differentials. Solvent and Hypoid gear oil.
4 cylinder Ford engines have dominated my life since I was 14. I am almost 68 now and this Flathead is making me feel wonderful. I think this may be what I was destined for and today I was thinking this might be how Bruce Jenner feels.

Rich

P.S. If you find a Maxwell Model 25 coil, let me know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 01:48 pm:

What, you can only enjoy one hobby at a time? Ever hear of multi-tasking?

Enjoy your new interest, it's always fun being on the steep part of the learning curve.

You'll be back..... :-O

Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

What? Only 1 type of car at a time? Then what am I doing with this flat plane air cooled 6 cylinder? Please tell me I can keep it in the dark corner of my shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 02:34 pm:

No, I have a '14 in the works too. I find it interesting how passionate we are about the cars we love but can't see other peoples passions or what gets them up in the morning. Hilary and her opponents for example. Or how upset a few of us get when someone paints their car the we wrong color or leaves it rusty or puts a water pump on or off. Human nature is a funny thing at I believe it is affecting how we work on our cars.

I've tried to keep an open mind ever since my best friend started restoring a Chevrolet. We have a good lesbian friend who we try to understand, but she has no compassion or tolerance for bigots. The World is a scary place but it's nice and cozy in the garage.

Just having fun.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 02:45 pm:

Well if your friend can't understand normal people then I guess it's her that has the problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 03:18 pm:

So she is a bigot herself lol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 03:19 pm:

About the flathead engine. Is it a ford one?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

Yes kep. It's a '36 going into a '35 Panel Delivery. The guy that gave it to me said it was a 21 stud but I have counted 42 so far.

I always liked the sound of them running. My Grandfather had a flatbed I drove to the dump occasionally. I had it for a while but let it get away. It was slower than the T's. Low geared.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Bracknell United Kingdom on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 03:37 pm:

I have my T , 28 Model A roadster pickup, 35 V8-60 Coupe, it's all allowed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 03:53 pm:

I think everyone needs a moment in combat to really get a handle
on life.

Every lesbian I have ever got to know is an angry manhating bigot
if you get them to open up.

T's are cool for their iconic place in American history. I can count
the rest of the Fords worthy of interest on my fingers. That's just me.
Call me a bigot. There is a world of difference between being discriminating
and being a bigot. Only those who haven't processed the meanings
think the two are the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:06 pm:

And I have my dad's '68 Chevrolet pickup!
As for your friend? A few of my best friends are gay. And they are among the best people I have ever known. Then again, I have known quite a few others that defy any amount of understanding. It has always amazed me how people that have been the victims of intolerance often seem to have the highest levels of intolerance themselves.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:14 pm:

I hear you Richard. I too have been playing with a flathead lately and having a great time. I recently became the caretaker of a piece of local history (at least in my opinion) in the form of a 1925 Model T coupe that has all V8-60 running gear, mostly 1940, including steering, 3 speed column shift, 4 wheel hydraulic drum brakes, a Columbia overdrive rear axle, and real tires. Outwardly, except for the tires and wheels it looks like a stock '25 coupe, but can easily accelerate, drive, and stop in traffic including 55-60 mph highways.

The cars picture has been posted here before and received all of the usual criticism (I see the picture but I don't see a Model T, how could anyone do that to an original car, hotrodders are using up all of the good material, etc.) but they are out of context and only looking at the car with current, modern eyes. This car was modified back in the late fifties / early sixties and was a daily driver in Long Beach for many, many years (the local history part) and I can remember seeing this car driving around when I was a kid myself.

What the current critics fail to realize is that when our hobby was in it's infancy in the fifties and sixties, this car was a 30 year old clunker that was still licensed and being driven. Cars like this could be bought for less than $50, and were often parked in the back row of used car lots with $50 and $75 price tags. The hobbyists at the time didn't want coupes and roadsters because they were young and had families. Sedans and tourings were the popular cars to restore and tour. Coupes were for chickens. Nobody "cut up" a highly desirable car 55 years ago, they modified an old "second car" nobody wanted.

I'm gathering the history of this car as I can, but so far it seems that in 1957 or 58, a $50 coupe was purchased and driven stock for a couple of years. Then the transformation began. I haven't found out yet if all of the pieces came from the same "donor car" but there is a lot of 1940, and maybe some '38 and '39 parts there. The owner drove it for a few years before getting another car, and then it became his wife's car. She drove it nearly daily at least 10 years, maybe more. The last owner saw it regularly at the grocery store before he bought it in 1992. Since then it has been a regular participant in Long Beach Model T Club events.

There were a lot of miles put on this car as a stock T in it's first 35 years, and even more in it's current configuration over the last 55 years!

I haven't quit Model T's, I still have 3 stockers, but I'm having some fun with a flathead powered car too, and I agree that the garage is a great place to be in my own cozy little world.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:28 pm:

My dad used the family sedan as his truck for many years. Finally he splurged in the late 60's he got his first 3/4 forest service (already worn out) Chevy pickup. He used several over the years and preferred the 62 to 68 GM trucks with the big six (292?) and truck 4 speed with a granny gear that was suitable for pulling good sized stumps which he did on occasion. He'd added side boards and would load them to the top of the cab with firewood and scare the heck out of us on logging roads. He had blocks to go between the frame and rear axle when he knew he was going to overload with drywall, beams or whatever. They rode about as well with the blocks as they did empty.

A couple years ago I attended an auction looking at some early to mid 30's pickups. I could get tempted by them again as a direct replacement for my modern PU. Lot's more character to a '34 IH PU than there is to an '06 Silverado.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:48 pm:

Jeff, the movement to preserve old Hot Rod is interesting in itself. Kind of ironic. I have a car that was a Model t Touring for 30 years, A variety of bodies for 10 years and now a Speedster for 50 years. I told a fellow it had been a Speedster since before his Mustang was built when he questioned it's authenticity. My Yellowstone bus was a Yellow Bus for 17 years, a Wrecker for 23 Years and has been a Maroon Bus for 30 plus years.

I suppose there will always be differences in what is right for each individual in cars and everything else.

It occurred to me that the first thing I saw this morning was on TV. A lady beating on her son for participating in the violence in Baltimore.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:48 pm:

As long as you leave the Model T engine in the model T, you can do whatever you want with the flat head.

I have owned 5 of them over my lifetime and I will say this, the flathead is much faster than a Model T, but it is not as dependable. The aftermarket fuel pumps might be better than the original, but it was always a good idea to keep a spare in the glove box with the older ones. The pump is on top and at the hottest spot under the hood except for the exhaust manifolds. They also tend to vapor lock in hot weather. The distributor is right in front very low and when you go through a puddle it gets wet. It was originally sealed with rubber gaskets and the wires coming out were sealed where they go into the pipe which routes them to the spark plugs, but if any of that leaks, you will drown the ignition system when you go through a puddle. Lastly, the exhaust ports go through the water jacket so they tend to cause overheating. Other than those things, it is a long lasting and good running engine. The stick shift on those cars were prone to having a worn shifting plate which would leave the low gear engaged when you shift into second. That would put you into two gears at the same time and lock up the car. That happened to me one time while crossing a very busy railroad track. Couldn't even push the car out of the way. Fortunately a motorcycle cop was able to push me with his front wheel against my back bumper and had enough power to slide my rear wheels off the tracks. Another time that happened in another car and I had to take a bus home and go back the next day to get the car.

Other than those things it is a good car. I like Model T's better.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 04:51 pm:

These new rigs have about as much character as a refrigerator or washing machine.
They all look alike.
You can tell a '59 Chev, Ford or Plymouth from a hunnerd yards away.
No way with cars (or trucks) made the last 20-30 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

Rich,
Yes, V-8s are a different animal—be sure and align the rods—you think Ts can be finicky, just wait until you deal with the two rods on one bearing set up. I’ve only done one V-8 and it was interesting. Back then I bought all NOS bearings and other parts, as they were available (36 year model). This was back when I was running Classic Car Restorers and the car was still owned by the guy that bought it in ’37. The car was a trunkback convertible sedan (yes a VERY rare model) that when he bought it as a year-old car, he proceeded to have Carson put on a solid “California Top” reputedly the 4th one Carson did. As part of the top, they chopped the top too, I think 4”—too many years ago. He also had a Pines trim front shell and fencer spears/covers put on it—oh, and hydraulic brakes
So, modified car—but modified pre-war, when the car was basically new. No attempt was made to undo his changes (he wanted it that way anyways); we were preserving history. Unfortunately (two things actually) the car sat in an open barn for decades, with the kids playing in it. They broke the custom dome lights, made a big hole in the top & other stuff kids do when playing on an “old piece of junk.” The barn had a dirt floor, so the floors had to be completely replaced. The second sad thing; we had the car running enough to drive it o their 50th wedding anniversary (even painted, but interior still to do—and the top too), and he passed away not long after that. The family bickered over the restoration bill and other stuff, and took the car away, where it sat in that open barn again for another 10 years. . . .
I remember a guy with a V-8 at a car show back then who could balance a quarter on the radiator with the motor idling.
As for more than one car—well gee, I started out with a Model A in grade school (still have it), Drove a running restoration ’39 Che. . . t town sedan to college & while courting my wife (rebuilt the engine in college auto class even). We were given a two-owner ’60 Olds 98 that we used as a daily driver, and sadly sold it when I thought gas was too expensive (Premium was a dollar!!). Moved onto a ’46 Che.. . .t coupe for our daily driver (it’s now in Italy, turns out was the 365th ’46 made!). We then moved to modern vehicles for daily use, but had two Model As for club outings. Finally got hooked on Model Ts, but also have a ’16 Dodge Brothers touring (in many pieces), and an inherited ’53 Dodge pickup. So, I don’t see ANY excuse to leave—besides, who else paints early car scenes (and others) like you??? You would just be too missed here!!!
Oh, and Walt, you think a '34 IH looks good, I HAD TWO '34 Dodge P/U, with chrome rad. shells and suicide doors--They were GOOD LOOKIN'. Oh the stupidity of selling those and buying a '71 Datsun pickup instead. . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 05:48 pm:

My 431 cubic inch 1966 Buick Nailhead-powered '82 Chevy pickup will tow the 16-foot trailer that I am looking for to hold my 1927 T Touring car. I love them both, and have far more money in the pickup then I do the T. I will part with neither.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 06:08 pm:

Nice to hear from you guys on this. Some great stories and info. I remember the Great Falls International tour they had us T's lead the way on each tour at our pace. The Flatheads Fords couldn't drive that speed without getting very hot. This engine was running well a few years ago and should be fine for running it in and out of the shop while I straighten out the body. I'm mainly trying to get my projects assembled rather than having my children struggling with boxes of unmarked parts when I'm gone in another hundred years. I haven't found one I really want to Full Out restore yet. Ya got to think ahead.


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