Still need some help

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Still need some help
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David W. Peaspanen on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:04 pm:

This was found in my 150 year old barn and I was told that it was related to a Model T or other early Ford....any thoughts? ThanksFirst picSecond pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

My guess is this is a Quack Medical device made in the 20's or 30's. It is missing one of the handles that would be plugged in to holes on the top and would provide a mild electrical stimulation (shock!). Except that a Model T owner may have bought it, nothing to do with Model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:16 pm:

Here is another thread on this item:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/526468.html?1426859512

Maybe a closeup in focus photo of the name tag and more photos of the tubular thing would help. What is inside the end of the tube?

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

I tried zooming in on the label, adjusting for the foreshortening, and enhancing the contrast. Can't make out much.

David, can you tell us what the label says?

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David W. Peaspanen on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:44 pm:

Yes....the metal tag on the side reads..."Eastern Electric Company..Cleveland, Ohio". "Patent applied for No. 3074". The additional holes in the top have only some plastic type grommets as do the two on the side under the tag, they simply empty into the box and do not appear to have any purpose in terms of connecting an internal component to an outside plug. On the end of the "handpiece" is only a single, heavy multi strand copper wire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 02:08 pm:

Since the power cord is designed to be screwed into an old style fuse box, I wonder if it is a circuit tracer for house wiring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 02:16 pm:

Mark is correct.

It's one of hundreds of Quack Medical devices, in the early age of electrical 'fixes' This one is the Violet Ray type.

Check out eBay, under 'Quack Medical Devices", here is one similar:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ANTIQUE-Rogers-Electric-Medical-VIOLET-RAY-Therapy-Machi ne-Quack-Medicine-/141412258541?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20ecd3d2ed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 04:18 pm:

The "plug" probably fits an early style (very similar to the current type) light-bulb socket. I am not sure when wall sockets first came out (maybe Burger knows off the top of his head?)? I think they were around about 1910 at least. However, for many years, from the early 1890s up until the mid 1930s at least, many houses were often wired for electricity using only various mounted and hanging types of bulb sockets. Some of them were hanging from the ceiling to be used alternately as light or as power for appliances. By the late '10s, most things like electric irons and toasters came with a two-flat-pin plug on the end of its cord, and also an adapter for a bulb socket. I have a few early appliances with the bulb socket ends still on them, and a nice original electric iron box that clearly shows the adapter pictured on the box. Earlier than 1920, many appliances came with lamp-socket only plugs. I have seen several pictures of the "modern housewife" from the 1930s showing her ironing with the iron plugged into a cord hanging from the ceiling. These cords were almost always bulb sockets, although I can remember some from a long time ago that had the adapters left in the socket. I think that was a common practice.
Just another era area to find out more about how our predecessors lived. (Hmm, if we sang about it, would we call that an era area aria?)
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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