Old Photo - Whimsymobil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Whimsymobil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 11:00 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 11:45 am:

Looks like a fairly early Centerdor, 1917 or 18?
It has several additions such as the chrome headlamp rims, so I would guess the picture was taken in 1954 by the license plate.
Any other ideas?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

In 1954, the car should have been registered with a Minnesota "A" plate because it was less than 2000 lbs. It's possible that the plate was borrowed from another car.

Also, starting in 1953, Minnesota issued permanent, Pioneer plates for cars 1925 and earlier so he could have had a registered it that manner.

My dad has 1954 Minnesota number three but he'd prefer to have number one. Sorry about the fuzzy photo - I cropped it from a much larger photo.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 12:46 pm:

Nice water pump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 12:47 pm:

Looks like an early Ducks fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 01:08 pm:

I like the sad iron anchor!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 01:11 pm:

Has Wards Riverside tires too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 04:30 pm:

Looks like some sort of accessory adaptation to the running board to force the running board to carry more than it was designed for. Imagine that! Well, I guess if those running boards could (and did) carry just about everything, including livestock, why not, right? Maybe those straps or whatever they are, were to secure a barrel of water for the water pump, huh? Anything's possible I guess. Great picture, as always Jay,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

Fifty-Two Ford parked behind it. Top of photo is marked 53/84 which may not be significant, since the plate is 1954.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 05:29 pm:

For Jay – thank you for another great photo.

For Tony – a 1917-1918 would have been sold without a starter/generator and would have had cowl lamps.

“IF” the front axle spring perches are original to the car it would be a 1919 or later since it has the below the axle front wishbone. Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/F-H.htm#fr1 1919.

“IF” the front one piece front motor mount was original to the car it would be a 1921 or later. Ref: page 324 of Bruce McCalley’s book “Model T Ford.”

“IF” I am seeing it correctly and “IF” it was original to the car, the crank handle would date the car late 1922 or later again page 324 of Bruce’s book. Also: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/C-D.htm#crank

“IF” the bail door handle was original to the car it would date it late 1921 or earlier.

Note the right front fender appears to have the folded over lip introduced during 1923 when the high-cowl Ts were introduced that had the valance underneath the radiator that matched the folded over lip on the front fenders.

So it appears a few things were replaced over the years. I would estimate it was a 1921 based on an average of the items and that the car has along with a 1954 license plate that indicates there was plenty of time to change things.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 05:30 pm:

Jeff,
I'm pretty sure that's a '51 Ford in the background. The '51's were the only model in that era with the two round grill ornaments as shown in the photo. The others, both before and after, had one in the center. At least that's my recollection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 05:55 pm:

Henry -- I thought it was a '51 as well.

Dave W. -- Those tires are probably still running, on someone else's car. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 06:41 pm:

Henry -- yes, the dual round grill ornaments were a one year only feature and it was the 1951 model year. Ref page 79 of "Hemmings Classic Car" #50; Nov 2008. See image #9 at: http://www.hemmings.com/hcc/stories/2008/11/01/hmn_feature22.html#PhotoSwipe1430 519728546 that has the photo and caption stating 1 year only 1951. Just the photo without the caption is at: http://assets.hemmings.com/story_image/127429-500-0.jpg?rev=2

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l915 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 07:32 pm:

The early 50's must have been a time when a worn model T driven on the street still was mostly a joke that you had to consider and choose between exaggerating the joke - or restore to something that shined and looked antique to hook on the new emerging antique auto hobby.

This centerdoor could have been built in the summer months of 1921 with most of the visible factory parts. The H lenses were introduced in June 1921 and the roof pillars got sheet metal coverings with the 1922 model that was introduced in August. The flaked paint indicates wooden pillars on this car. Hopefully it was saved by some young enthusiast?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 08:58 pm:

You'd be sad too if you had to handle one of those irons 8-10 hours a day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daryl Miles on Friday, May 01, 2015 - 10:27 pm:

I like the turn signal! I wish people would use them where I live!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 01:13 am:

"The early 50's must have been a time when a worn model T driven on the
street still was mostly a joke .... "

The American "Antique" scene and public opinion changed drastically between
1960 and 1970 and beyond. Antique shop owners and dealers were largely a
snooty lot of highbrow Early American furniture and related items traders and
little else. With the rapid change of materials and technology brought about as
fallout from the war, a peculiar nostalgia and sentimentality incrementally set in
upon the "antiques" market and today the very notion is awash in plastic "collectibles"
made 10 weeks ago in China !!!

Antique cars pretty much followed the same path. High brow types with old
high brow makes and body types, but soon the quaint and queer stuff gathered
a following as well. But even within my lifetime, I well remember many old car
guys giving me a rash of #@! for wasting my time on something so "embarrassing"
as a post-war car. Old cars (outside of the AACA designated "classics") were
the realm of the weird and eccentric, or the self-effacing nob who liked to clown
around like our buddy pictured above.

I was always enamored by the old, stubborn farmers and Depression survivors
who kept on driving these early cars simply as regular cars, well past their "fashion"
expiration date and long after most people upgraded to newer and more improved
performing vehicles. It wasn't about fashion or anything else. It was just a car/
truck and it still worked "just fine" !!!

From 1900 to 1970, automobiles arguably got better and better for braking, speed,
handling, and comfort, and it is quite understandable as to why people wanted to
leave the oldies behind. But something happened about 1970 and the always
improving technology and interesting styling turned to boring plastic jellybeans
and the old car scene became a haven for everyone looking to enjoy a little nostalgic
"look back". From Henry's T to a #@! Corvair, the common schmuck can be a part
of the old car hobby without being looked at as the eccentric loon from down the lane. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 07:20 am:

No Burger, I gotta disagree. That guy two blocks over with the Corvair convertible is definitely a loon. The car showed up three years ago looking pretty good. Now it sits on four flat tires, somewhat covered with a blue plastic tarp being held down with some very badly worn tires. There are two push type lawn mowers jammed up under the back bumper and its bodily fluids are running out into the street and down the storm sewer. For about a month last summer the tires were aired back up and a "For Sale $5000.00 320-393-XXXX" sign was on it. The wind ripped the sign off and the air in all four tires went out into the universe and once again it sits on its flats. I talked to the guy one time and he is definitely a "Loon".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 10:34 am:

There will always be exceptions. :-)

Frankly, I still see the world through the old prism, thus making me
a loon, as well as all of you'uns. But in the main, most people are far
more forgiving of the loon on their street with the old cars than they
were in 1960. Even the Corvair guy ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 01:46 pm:

Henry and Mike, you are right! I knew it was a '51 also but typed '52 instead. Fifty-two was the new body style. The car in the picture is the last year of the '49-'51 style.

When I was a kid, the next door neighbor had one of those and always referred to it as a '52 because that is when he bought it, but it was a left-over '51.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 02:30 pm:

Jeff,
I cheated. My parents were married in January 1947, but they didn't get their own car until mid-1951. It was a brand new 1951 Ford. We drove that car until 1957, when they traded it in on a new Ford Country Sedan. So, I remember it pretty well! Further, the year after they bought the '51, my grandfather bought a brand new 1952 Ford, which he drove until 1964, so I remember it pretty well too. Saw them side by side many times. :-)

P.S. Dang, do I ever wish we would have kept that old iron!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 04:22 pm:

As the Model T replaced the horse, the "sad iron anchor" is not an anchor at all but it is a tether. Curbing the horse was accomplished by either a hitching post, an iron ring attached to the curb stone, or a portable 20+ pound weight known as a tether.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 05:48 pm:

I had a 51 Ford convert. in high school. Had to have it painted a different color as it became too well known to the Lansing cops. Never did like that ford-o-matic. Went out on me on the New Jersey turnpike returning home from NAS Quanset Point.


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