Break quadrant

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Break quadrant
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 03:17 pm:

Can teeth on the emergency break quadrant be re-cut with body on the car? Thanks for any suggestions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 03:39 pm:

Probably not. There isn't enough room to place a file, and even to switch it to another, you would almost have to replace it with bolts, as it would be impossible to re-rivet it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 03:50 pm:

I just looked at my 1924 cut-off touring and it sure looks like there's plenty of room to get a small triangular file in there from above if you remove the floorboards. :-)

Almost all of the quadrant teeth stick up above the top of the frame rail on my car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 05:37 pm:

Nick - It's been my experience (limited however) that if your emergency brake won't hold, the quadrant is sometimes not the biggest part of the problem. Quite often, you can either sharpen the point of the pawl, or, even replace the pawl which is available from the largest of our "T" parts vendors. Actually, sharpening is just a "band-aid" fix as I believe a new replacement pawl might be hardened.

While on this subject, once you have the sharpened pawl and a useable quadrant, you can make the whole set-up last for a very long time by making a habit of squeezing the e-brake lever and holding it as you pull the lever back, and then just release your grip once the lever is pulled back. Practically eliminates any wear on the quadrant that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 06:48 pm:

Gee youse guys live in the past--get out yer Dremel tool with a cut-off disk in it, lots of room for that. If you sharpen your pawl, I recommend hardening it a bit (light-dull red and quench in oil). Of course, now it's harder than the quadrant, so do as Harold mentions. Listening to the click-click-click is not a good thing!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 09:29 pm:

My quadrant notches had become rounded with use. I guess you can sharpen them in the car but I found it easier to grind off the rivets and pull the quadrant out. Once in a vise it was easy to touch up the notches.

Replaced the quadrant with bolts so it will come off easy next time. While squeezing the lever will probably save those notches and pawl a bit longer, I love the sound of the emergency brake "clicking" on. Kinda like the sound of the coils buzzing away.

If I have to replace a pawl and sharpen the quadrant every 5 years, so be it ! ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Saturday, May 02, 2015 - 09:33 pm:

Check the pawl first remove tge spash shield and have a go
Problem is not the body its the spash shield i cut deeper cuts with a dremmel


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By wayne johnson on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 08:56 am:

How do you get the pawl off? Do you cut it? How do you put the new one in? My new pawl and rivet or pin just came in the mail and I'm not sure how you keep it together?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 10:07 am:

I have taken a chisel in the past to sharpen the teeth without taking the quadrant off. Place a small chisel in the notch and give it a whack or two with a hammer, then move to the next, etc. it worked well and saved replacing it for a while. ie, I had a working e brake for the tour!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 10:25 am:

Wayne: You must remove the entire controller shaft assembly which is easy enough to do. Drive out the old rivet, after you file it down, and install the new one. Easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 10:33 am:

FWIW, don't forget to squeeze the handle any time you pull the handle back. Not squeezing it and letting the pawl ride across the quadrant click, click, click, click is what causes both the pawl and the quadrant to wear.
A Snap-on ratchet doesn't usually wear out, but a T quadrant and pawl sure do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 11:20 am:

Thanks all. I think I will start by refinishing with a dremel and a new paw. Also get a new quadrant when the old one wears out again.
Nick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By wayne johnson on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

Thank you Larry. Once the new one is in place do you just give it a good whack with a hammer to expand it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 03:14 pm:

I agree with the fellers- squeeze and release to engage the brake. But it is such a bummer as I do love that sound of the pawl chattering....it is so quaint....miss it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 04:49 am:

If filing the teeth on the quadrant with a three corner file works, then the angle of the teeth must be 60 degrees. Somehow I don't think so. If you get the correct angle on the front of one tooth, the layback on the next will be out of whack. A new quadrant is the only real answer. Just make sure it is the dearer laser cut item. There were some stamped ones available a while back. These were inferior because the stamping action rounded off the side of the teeth so they were not much more than half the width of the material.

Of course, a new quadrant should be mated with a new pawl.

This is a safety item that should never be the subject of short cuts. Park on a slope, have a member of the public climb aboard and the twist in the frame may well let your pride and joy loose to wreak untold damage.

I dodged this bullet once. Never again.

Allan from down under.


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