Restoration question concerning bondo on wood??

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Restoration question concerning bondo on wood??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

I put rattle can primer on the sheet metal and wood to prevent surface rust.

The salesman at PEP Boys said bondo has a little flex for metal but does not adhere to wood very well. He suggested wood filler from Home Depot.

What do you say? I want to fill the wood under the touring and at the floor board area but wood filler might crack and look worse than leaving it alone and being ok with it as is.

Thank you in advance, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

Give it a good coat of flat black.It will look more original. The wood in a model T didn't look like furniture to begin with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

I have used Minwax High Performance Wood Filler to fill in cracks on exterior window sills on on my parents' house. As far as I'm concerned it looks, smells and behaves exactly like Bondo. The only difference is Bondo is pink while Minwax filler is off white.

Like Bondo, it comes in a metal can and includes a small tube of hardener. You mix it and apply it just like Bondo.

This is just my experience - it's not necessarily a recommendation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

What condition is your wood in and is it a major frame piece that may require replacement for safety reasons? Many folks here have used Quick Poly a wood epoxy product to fill and reinforce some wood pieces but you need to make sure your frame is solid to ensure safety.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:57 pm:

Thank you both for your response. One of my concerns is the ability of the wood filler rot flex with the body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:58 pm:

should say, .....filler TO flex.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:58 pm:

I have used bondo on wood with good results the only problem with it is that it is porous and if not sealed will absorb moisture then if it freezes will cause more damage than was originally there. I prefer a product called Rock Hard comes in a powder and once dry is very durable it is readily available at your favourite home improvement store


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 12:59 pm:

I forgot about Qucik Poly. OI used that before. The would is ok. Next restoration might need new wood. For now it is just separation from other wood pieces are nail to or scratches and some 'acceptable' cracks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 01:17 pm:

Bondo will adhere to wood. however its rigid and will not flex, so if you use it where the body flexes the bondo will pull away from the parent wood.

It can be drilled and shaped to fill and contour, but will not add strength. As stated above it will absorb moisture which will cause it to loose any grip to wood.

In small amounts its ok but in larger amounts not so good.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 01:50 pm:

About 6 or 7 years ago I was asked to use bondo over the all wood body of a 1903 curved dash Olds replica before I painted it black for the guy building it. I had never done this before but it did turn out looking real nice and other than small cracks where the joints are in the body it has held up very well. What I did was to coat the entire body with a thin coat and then sand it as thin as possible so I could just see the wood through the bondo in some places. I have also see the so called "experts" on TV on shows like Home Time use it to repair damaged wood on house projects. I don't know that this would be a good thing but it does work to a point. If you are going to replace the wood later and its not a safety issue I see no harm. The bondo might even be easy to remove if someone decides to save the original wood later by just the use of a little heat or paint remover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 02:12 pm:

I have used Bondo for home wood repairs, it does a good job.

I have heard that Bondo's thermal expansion is a little different from wood and that eventually cracks will appear, but so far so good on the repairs that I have done. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 02:21 pm:

Bondo works fine on wood if it's clean and dry. It does nothing for strength, it's just cosmetic. You might consider first applying shellac , it will stick to anything but has little weather resistance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 03:17 pm:

I worked for an architectural woodworking company in a former life. I was surprised to learn that they used bondo to fill some imperfections in the wood used for painted cabinets. There was no flexing involved, and very little temperature change, but it worked great under those conditions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 03:42 pm:

As long as Bondo is sealed on both side of the repair it is a very good repair. Do not use it on seams or places prone to cracking as that is a point for moisture to start seeping in. Do not drill holes to make it hold better, that is a very common mistake. All the unsealed Bondo on the back side of the holes or seams is like a sponge. Do not expect it to hold up over rust holes. Its the same thing, moisture comes in from the back side. Now if you can seal the back side it does pretty good over holes and rust pits. Its just a matter of making sure both sides are sealed. As to using it on wood, it works great. Just do not apply it directly to the wood. Use Quik-Poly or thinned spar varnish, or a good two part primer before the Bondo. Do not ever, put it across a crack or seam and expect it to hold. Use it on both sides of the seam and keep the seam clear. An old wood worker (mentor) of mine once told me about seams in wood (or old cars) If you can not "hide it" you must "flaunt it" So if it is a seam "make it look like a seam" These are my opinions on the matter, and like Forrest Gump says, "that's all I have to say about that" :-) Good luck with your project


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Quick Poly works well. I used it on the wood frame in my T's body and it did a superb job. I did not have major damage but used it on a few bad spots.

I have used this outfit's stuff on my home (built in 1918) and found it to be very good.

http://conservepoxy.com/

There are different grades, the strongest of which is for structural use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 04:44 pm:

Use West System's 105 epoxy with desired hardener when you want something with a little more body thank Kwik-Poly (syrup consistency) and a lot more work time. If you need to fill rotted areas, mix with their 406 Colloidal Silica filler up to a peanut butter-like consistency. Particularly if you want to apply automotive grade finishes over wood, this will create the transition layer you need in addition to being able to fill defects and have material to block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Livingston, Honolulu, Hawaii on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 06:44 pm:

Second the suggestion to use West System epoxies and fillers. Their web site has a lot of information and videos (at least the last time I looked). We've used it to restore 85 year old center and intermediate sills during a railroad passenger car restoration and are quite pleased with the result. This type system is used in many historical restorations.

Jeff


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration