Model T Jack Performance?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Model T Jack Performance?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 03:10 pm:

Alright, I am going to show some stupidity here- can someone post a video how to use the standard 1909-1926 screw-type jack? It kinda spooks me under the weight of the car and I want to learn how to use one.

Thanks!!
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 03:33 pm:

OK, later if somebody doesn't beat me to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 04:08 pm:

Not too difficult to figure out - Ford provided millions of those jacks to the masses and I'm not attempting to be a wise-cracker ! Flip the ratchet toggle one way to jack up - switch toggle other direction to let down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Like I said, seems simple, but while the jack is under load and you flip the toggle- what about the downward pressure?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 04:53 pm:

The downward pressure of the car won't turn the screw. You must do that using the handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Mike is correct. No problem. Here's the show.

https://youtu.be/bS1umhEoPsM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 06:15 pm:

Steve

Your new video just confirms you are a jack of all trades!


:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 06:23 pm:

Good Vid Steve know all I have to do is source one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 06:58 pm:

You must have been a "movie producer" in a previous life, Steve - good show !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 07:32 pm:

You are amazing- thank you, Steve! For some reason I was hesitant with the load on the jack to flip the ratchet...you proved me incorrect.

Thanks again for taking the time to post! Good Show!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 08:34 pm:

Steve, another very well done video. Simple and effective.

A variation I would like to add that is a bit faster. I place the jack into position and lift the center screw section of the jack up to the axle, then spin the gear wheel down to the lower end with my free hand.

That saves a few seconds. But then we who drive Model T Fords are rarely interested in max speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

Most important part of the video, block the wheel!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 05:17 am:

So many of the T jacks I find have bent up bases. This is probably caused by the car rolling while jacked up, or by some indolent pushing the car off the jack rather than winding it down. Hence the need to chock the wheels. It is a good idea to carry a stout piece of wood on which to put the base of the jack. This hard surface also prevents the jack base digging into a soft road surface and also liberating the car at an unfortunate time, and perhaps adding to the bent foot of the jack.

If you need to bend the base of the jack back to flat, you must use red heat. Don't ask wj=hat happens if you attempt this cold.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 11:48 am:

Gosh Steve, you went to too much trouble! When adjusting the jack to go under the axle, all you need to do is lift up on the top of the jack and spin the gear until you get the proper height.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 12:33 pm:

If it were going to slip, it would never ratchet. The handle would just come right back up every time you relieved the downward pressure on it. You have essentially flipped the ratchet each time you take an upstroke on the handle. The same friction that holds it after you flip the ratchet is what holds it on the upstroke of the handle when you are jacking it up. If you are uncomfortable with it, try it a few times without ever taking a wheel off until you gain confidence. Stay out form under it and it can only fall the distance you raised it. If you lift it an inch, it can only fall an inch. But there's really no reason to fear it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Saturday, May 09, 2015 - 11:18 am:

Is it safe to start the car while one rear wheel is on the jack? Sometimes on tours I gotta do that and the jack seems so flimsy it kinda scares. (I just got the jack.) I always block one front wheel when I do this. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, May 09, 2015 - 11:30 am:

I jack up one rear wheel to start the T several times each winter. It is on dirt not pavement. I don't always block the front wheel but should. I don't recall it ever slipping off but if it did the engine would most likely kill. Do be careful but it most likely will not be a problem.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, May 09, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but there are three different jacks produced during the Model T era. The first one is the Buckeye jack. There is no documentation that I'm aware of on this. The next one is the common Ford screw jack, and I don't believe there is any documentation on it either. The last is the common ratchet jack made by Ajax and Walker. They came out in 1924 and were used to the end. Again, there is no documentation. I've always assumed that they would be the same height as the screw jack, which is 10 inches, BUT, if you have a T with a flat tire, the jack will not fit, so maybe it only needs to be 9.5"? Lastly, I have no information the flip top jack used on Model A's were ever used on T's, but who knows. I guess the thing to do is use what ever works, and forget about what is correct!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, May 09, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

Larry

There is documentation.

Ford Parts and Price book picture, and research by Prof. of Every Thing Model T.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, May 09, 2015 - 02:10 pm:

Here's a scanned version of that page. It's from the 8-5-28 book and shows the pressed jack and the TT jack.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 12:05 am:

I have all that stuff. Other than the photo, what is there to go by? Assuming the photos in the parts book were all taken at the same time, the jack comes out to 10". That is what I have gone by. I don't recall finding anything at the archives.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 09:28 am:

Alligator Jack on CL>
http://porthuron.craigslist.org/tls/4987583859.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 10:43 am:

Larry

Here is the Aug 1925 re-design of the stamped metal jack. It has the hinged top. Photos compare it to the std. screw jack of earlier days.

The advantage is the stamped jack is fast, easy to ratchet up, locks with lever. Flip lever and jack goes down fast. Much nicer action than screw jack. Plus, flat, shorter, and stores easier. Mfg. by Walker, stamped on side. No script on it. The jack for '26-'27 T's.











The Walker '26'27 Jack measures 8 1/2" closed, with extension up its 10 1/2" Same as the screw jack, which is 10 1/2" closed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 06:35 am:

Richard, thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 09:19 am:

Nice job as usual, Steve.
Your videos are always clear and concise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 11:01 am:

I carry a couple of 2 X 6's to put under the jack when raising the rear axle. That way I don't have to screw it out as far to come in contact with the axle. A 4 X 6 works good too. The front axle sits lower so don't need them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 11:37 am:

Thanks Dan. As usual, you are right on, but I still have a question! Where in Aug '25 is the flip top jack referenced? I have that Walker jack, but did Ajax make one too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 12:06 pm:

Back to the original concern...

A general rule of thumb for self locking of an inclined plane is that regardless of size or material, shallower than 14 degrees it WILL self-lock without creep. (There is physics behind the 'rule' but I never learned it :-) )

They only look like funny stubby ACME threads, the Model T screw-jack is actually an inclined plane wrapped around a rod and is LESS than 14 degrees to horizontal...ergo...no external brake or 'catch' is needed.

FWIW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 12:45 pm:

I have a nice # 3 Walker i use if home and the Model T jack i keep under the rear seat.I think the T jack is a pita so i only use it if i have too!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


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