Kevlar Bands

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Kevlar Bands
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Antonino on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 10:57 pm:

What is the proper break in and adjustment for kevlar band? I installed new ones and have been slowly adjusting the tightness in the bands. I know not to create drag on the drums, but how do you know when it is too much? Also how far down should hi /low pedal be before it engages the low band? And where should the pedal be for neutral?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 11:19 pm:

Jared, I am probably not a good choice for unbiased info but here are my thoughts on Kevlar. I believe there is little to no break in time as they are very duriable. At least that is how my set acted. I also believe it is harder to get the rivets set deep enough to not give problems with rubbing on the drums. I just changed out my Kevlars today. They had about 400 miles on them, I had re adjusted them a couple times as I sneaked up on a "Goldielocks" setting. (not to tight, not too loose)Then no more adjustments. I replaced them with a NOS set of Scandinavians. I just thought the "feel" was to harsh for my liking. The set of Scandinavians I put in today feel "so much better" to me. I have always set my bands to use about 1/2 of the cam notch on the pedals. The Kevlar setting was about the same, maybe a little less than 1/2 the notch (toward the loose setting) With about 400 miles on my Kevlar bands, they still look new. There were 2 rivets that had started to rub on the drums, so I would pay very close attention to setting the rivets very well. a rubbing rivet will harden and then cut a groove in the drum ... Here are a couple of pics of my used Kevlars after about 400 miles. Im going to carry them as my spare set under the seat for a "back up" set. Someone else should be able to give a better break in explanation, but that is how it worked out for me.

kevlar

kevlar 2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 11:29 pm:

Adjust so the pedal is about an inch from the floor board when you mash it all the way down. That should leave plenty of slack for no drag. Be aggressive with the low and reverse pedals. It's easing into starts that wears out linings. I don't worry about neutral with the pedal as long as I get it with the hand lever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 11:40 pm:

Jared,
In the first month, I adjusted my Kevlar bands 2 times. They have been in our 13 touring for 15 years and are still doing great. I set the split rivets deeper than what Donnie has done using the ball end of a ball peen hammer.
Adjust the Kevlar bands looser compared to cotton linings. Keep the slippage to a minimum and you will love them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, May 03, 2015 - 11:54 pm:

Here is an older post good for reading comments.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/324798.html?1354957118

The adjustment will be varied due to the differences of each T. The pedal shape (some are bent out of shape over the years), the cams on the pedals or on the hogshead (some are so worn you wonder how anyone could use 'em!), and floorboards that don't fit (pedal stems hit the slots before the bands get tighten!), and the bands and band springs (some bands are too out of round, and springs worn).

So for me, adj. the bands initially by looking into the inspection opening. Push pedals with your hands, see how the band closes. You want to then mash with foot, and note closing. They should spring open when released. Test with starter motor, turn over slowly, with band tight to see the drum is stopped with pedal pushed down.

Then, road test. Most times, the low might need a bit of adjustment. Reverse is usually easy to adjust. Brake is done same as low. You don't want the band to slip in low or brake. Too loose is wrong. Too tight is usually hard to do, the T will be stalling on starting up if bands are too tight, so too tight isn't where you end up first, unless all your pedal parts are worn out. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 04:33 am:

Dan makes very good sense. No two T's are alike after all the years of use and abuse they have undergone, so measurements can be of little value.

My rule of thumb is to adjust kevlar bands so they just work well. Resist the temptation to give them and extra turn just to make sure. It is better to take them up a couple of more times as they bed in. Once that is achieved, you will hardly ever have to touch them again. If you do get them too tight, they will heat up and drag, and your car will labour to get along.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 11:52 am:

Rivets in bands will not wear the drums if set properly.

Properly, does not involve a ball peen hammer, wood, or a steel shaft, ect.

The rivets should go through the band and hit a rivet anvil, which curls the ends around and sends them back towards the lining and sets them deep.

You can't just hammer them flat, or they will wear the ends off before there time and let loose.

This is what the anvil should look like, it can be made on a lathe easily.

You can make the anvil to clamp in a vice, and set the band on top, and then set the rivet. That's the only place a hammer should be used.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 11:59 am:

This is the way it looks after the rivet is set.







Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 12:50 pm:

I use kevlar bands and like them a lot. Adjust them so they engage securely with the pedal an inch or so above the floorboard, and when they wear to the point they almost touch the floor, adjust them to the 1" point again. Typically, you will need to adjust them 2 or 3 times after the initial setting, then not again for a long time (several thousand miles).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 04:55 pm:

Someone used to make an inexpensive pair of 'punches' to install tubular and split rivets. One looked like the one in Herm's photo and the other was concave to fit head of the rivet. You just put one in a vise and hit the other with a hammer. Seems like the pair was maybe $8 or so? They do a very professional job of curling either type of rivet. I tried to find them on Lang's and Bratton's (Seems like I got them while working on my A), but I did not see them either place. Maybe someone else knows where to find them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 05:49 pm:

Hal

Lang's #3422RST Rivet setting tool, pliers like
$30

Lang's #3422RT Rivet punch tool. hit with a hammer. (somewhat like Herms' tool) $23


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 08:34 pm:

Similar to that, but mine were made from maybe 3/8 round stock. I may have been wrong about the price, but I don't think the pair was as much as that single, but then again, it was several years ago too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, May 04, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

For setting split rivets you can make your own tool from a piece of square stock.




It should be long enough to stand above the band if you're doing transmission rivets.


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