OT - One of the best known car photographs of the early 1900's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT - One of the best known car photographs of the early 1900's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

My last Model K owner featured a woman of possibly "ill repute." It's good to get back to a wholesome figure who contributed to the America of the early 1900's.

Locomobile used this photo and variations of it as advertising at the turn of the last century:



The photo was taken by one of America's leading outdoor photographers of the period, Oliver Lippincott:



Mr. Lippincott and his entourage converted a Locomobile to a type of early all terrain vehicle for his photo safari's of the far west:




As it turns out, the Lippincott family later owned a Ford "six", and like many easterners, took frequent weekend trips, in this case documented by the Boston Herald:








Good to see a Model K "success story." After the last few "K" owner stories involving speeders, all night galavanting and cavorting, it's good to read about a nice wholesome family taking in the joys of New England automobiling. A story with a happy ending about a nationally renowned photographer who chooses a Ford as one of his cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

I have stood on that rock. (overhanging rock). It was years ago when we could still do things like that. We went to Yosemite about 3 years ago, they do not allow you to get near the overhanging rock anymore. That has always been one of my favorite early car explorer pics. My grandparents first trip thru Yosemite was in the mid teens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 03:25 pm:

And if you stand out on the rock and look down you can still see the parts of the first car and bones from guide that was leading the group on their adventure! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 03:30 pm:

That's what I was thinking Dennis. I think that Locomobile in the photo must have had better brakes than our T's. You'd never catch me with my TT in such a precarious spot!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 04:46 pm:

You wouldn't catch ME in that spot much less with a CAR........YIKES


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 06:07 pm:

If I recall correctly, shortly after Lippincott's visit with the Locomobile, the park service banned automobiles from most of the park areas. It wasn't until about 1913 (or '14? '15?) that the ban was lifted. One of the first cars to enter the park after the ban was lifted was a Studebaker driven by a San Francisco dealer that drove in as soon as the winter's snow melted enough. He continued to try to be the first car in each year for a few years after that.
There is another famous photo of a 1915 six cylinder Studebaker sitting out on that same rock!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 08:38 pm:

I saw another picture of that car taken the same day. I believe it was on display at the visitor center at the park. It is taken from on top near the overhanging rock. It shows some very big ropes and best I remember some blocks and tackle to get it to where it is sitting. Its actually relatively flat on top. My grandpa used to tell stories about going into the Yosemite valley during the teens and 20s. He said the roads were so narrow and dangerous that they had cables attached to the bluff (uphill) side of the road. On the cables were chains and hooks to hook to your car. You hooked up to the cables (one on the front and one on the rear). You drove as far as you could till you had to re-hook you chains to get past a anchor point in the side of the mountain. He said you did that all the way to a safer point in the road. Grandma was afraid to ride in the car so she was the one to walk along beside the car and re-hook the chains. I think all the stories grandpa used to tell about all their trips in the model Ts back in the teens, 20s 30s era is why I like model Ts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 08:51 pm:

Courtesy of the internet - Studebaker:

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 08:52 pm:

A Metz dealer drove to the Grand Canyon in 1914 for a similar photo.



Metz 22 At The Grand Canyon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 10:17 pm:

Well, Those fellows must have a couple of components larger than mine, or 1 that is smaller than mine.As I aint gonna be sitting on that rock like that! I am skeered and aint afraid to say it!.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 07, 2015 - 10:21 pm:

I don't know exactly where, but the claim is that Metz was driven down one side of the canyon and out on the other. It was claimed to be the first car to be driven across the canyon itself.

Thanks for the Studebaker picture Erik J!
And thanks Phil!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Friday, May 08, 2015 - 12:06 am:

It looks as though our future K owner, photographer Lippincott, was the first to drive his Locomobile to the rock formation. The story included with the photo said ropes and pulleys were used to bring the car to it's final spot for the photo.

It appears Mr. Lippincott would suffer another type of fall (from grace) a few years after owning his Ford:




Maybe I need to find a doctor or pastor who owned a K. The folks I'm running across now seem to have had a few skeletons in their closets. Reality TV has nothing new compared with some of these stories.
:-)


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