Powder coat finish for fenders

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Powder coat finish for fenders
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:03 pm:

Many people have sung the praises of powder coating and how durable it is. This makes me wonder if this would be a viable finish for the fenders or any other body parts for that matter.

Body and paint are not my best subjects and I don't pretend to know much about them. Since my car will be painted soon, these issues pop up in my head and you all have the honor of reading about them :D

So, would powder coating be a good choice of finish for large body parts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Moore on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:10 pm:

No


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:17 pm:

In a word Eric "NO" body parts usually need fine detail work. rarely are guards straight enough that that powder coating would provide a satisfactory finish,

Great for chassis parts, axles, steering parts, wire wheels

Its advantage is you get an even coating on complicated shapes which are difficult to paint with normal methods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:33 pm:

I have a harley frame that was powder coated and I plan to strip it off. it does not look right to me. but I think if you had a car that was used hard and left outside it might out last and protect better than any thing else


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:33 pm:

i did the new fenders for my 13 in powder coat then sand and paint the top side.looks good to me + power coat is cheaper. Charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:54 pm:

I had a set of new repro running boards powder coated black. They turned out great and matched the black paint on the body of my car to my satisfaction.

board1

board2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

Peter, Guards made me think for a second. Then looked as to where you live.
Charley, I like that idea. Gives a good base that should keep the rust away for years. Plus it fills in all the pits and gives a smooth finish to work with, Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, May 10, 2015 - 08:39 pm:

If you want durability, paint the car with urethane and wax it often. That's what's on my car. Urethane is a tough paint that's used on truck fleets. It's important for me because I don't want something non original on my car like a step plate which means I have to step right on the paint job to get in and out of the car. The finish has held up amazingly well for years even on that running board.

Parents seem to know this as they always let little Johnnie jump up and down on my running boards when I leave my car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 06:47 am:

Thanks for your input everyone. Powder coat offers important advantages but it is important to keep its limitations in mind as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 07:20 am:

I always felt like the parts on a T flexed to much for powder coat to hold up without cracking?
Powder coat on wire wheels has been known to allow slippage of the tire bead as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 09:39 am:

There is no repairing of powdercoat. It is an all-or-none program.
And when it fails, it peels like a banana. And when you need to redo
it, the only way to get back to metal is a HARD sandblast or a house
fire. I used to use powdercoat a lot, but won't anymore. Paint is too
easy to apply, repair, and maintain. Powdercoat DOES fail, and when
it does, it is a PITA to unf%#k.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 01:16 pm:

The other thing you should know is that "powdercoat" is not some special kind of paint. Powdercoating is a process, not a material. So you need to choose the right kind of powder paint for your application, just like you choose the right kind of wet paint.

The actual material used in powdercoating might be an epoxy, or a polyester, or a polyurethane, an acrylic, or a hybrid. Each type of material has its own strong points and weak points. When you take a part to Joe Powdercoater you will get whatever he uses, which is typically the cheapest and most easy to use.

Will you be having a corrosion resisting primer applied to your part before the final finish ? That increases the cost and most vendors don't bother. Will you be choosing a final finish for UV resistance, or for toughness, or for chip resistance ? If you go to a local powdercoating shop with questions like these they'll probably suggest you go someplace else.

If you find somebody who offers a variety of products and can help you select the best finish for your application, you will be much better off. But that guy probably won't be cheap.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 02:37 pm:

Dick is right, the job will no better than the man doing it. Make sure that the coater cleans his oven often,( when I ran a E-Coat/ power plant we cleaned the oven each Sat). We did work for the big 3. Most shops you talk to will be small batch shops, fast in and out. If you are looking for rust protection, look into E-coat for a primer. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

Used to be that a commonly used term that manufacturers liked to use (like my first new bicycle which was a Schwinn) to describe their product(s) in a positive way was,...."baked-on enamel"! Don't hear that much anymore, but the term does come to mind as perhaps a "compromise" method that manufacturers used to apply a high quality and hopefully,....long-lasting finish!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 03:41 pm:

We did it to our Model N fenders. They were rough and pitted, so stripping and cleaning were difficult but I've been very pleased with the results. We live on a county gravel road and this is the only car we own that hasn't pitted and rusted under the fenders due to gravel.

With this car the fenders are small, and didn't need to match anything else as they were the only black body parts. We also powder coated the brackets. Mi think the key is finding a high gloss paint that is will stand up to UV rays:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 04:49 pm:

I was thinking about having the hogs head and crankcase powder coated. This obviously would have disasterous results if the coating were to peel off inside the engine.

Is there a "best" type of coating for these applications?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 05:24 pm:

I had the black body parts (fenders, running boards, etc.) powder coated. Redone several times and any pits on all of the parts reappeared in the finish. The company would redo and say that the pits would fill in. Sanding and buffing would make the surface flat and look great. It did but the painter for the rest of the body said it would leave "fish eyes" as it ages since several layers were exposed.

He used the powder coating as a primer and repainted over the surface. I would suggest it may be stronger than a regular primer but put a regular finish on top for a better and more uniform look. Nick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 07:42 pm:

Eric, you can powder coat the crankcase and hogs head no problem. Just remember the powder is subject to a high temperature so the part must be clean or any oil or grease will burn and the smoke will ruin the coating.

As the insides are going to not only not be seen but coated in oil just mask off anywhere you don't want the powder.

I would also block off any holes such as pedal shafts, crank handle holes as the powder will get into them and they will then need to be cleaned out. I just stuff some rag into them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 07:53 pm:

i also use it on my Indians if it is put on right the only way to get it off is to burn it off with the torch .works great to make a iron hogs head look like alun. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie - Chehalis, Washington on Monday, May 11, 2015 - 10:14 pm:

Eric, If you are talking about coating the inside of the engine and hogshead use glyptal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:35 am:

You should see an E-coated block. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Allen on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:46 pm:

Here is a picture of a '26 with powder on fenders, splash aprons and running boards.



Make sure that the person doing the powder coating is really good at doing it.
Fenders are a little tricky because they bend. You don't want to crack the surface.
Regards,
Jon


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