Hyatt bearing sleave removal? Help!

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Hyatt bearing sleave removal? Help!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson. Moruya, NSW, OZ on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 01:10 am:

Gents,
I have the rear axle completely disassembled and about to start a complete re-build.
However, I cant remove the Hyatt bearing sleaves.
Your suggestions/instructions please?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 01:29 am:

G'day Rob,

I found that old grease had formed a bond between the sleeve and the axle tube. I had a fight, but it let go when turning the sleeve so it would collapse into the gap in the sleeve, turning the wrong way only tightens the sleeve in the housing. Great fight, lots of swearing and persistence won out.
Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 01:41 am:

Get the tool if you already don't have one:

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2509SP.aspx

You put it in the sleeve, the spring loaded pin/button rests in the hole in the sleeve, turn the tool and pull out the sleeve.

As Peter indicate above, the sleeve is split and twisting the sleeve causes the diameter to decrease. The above tool usually makes easy work of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Rosenthal in Cincinnati Oh on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 07:47 am:

Rob:
The sleeve has a chevron shaped gap that must be fully cleared in order for the sleeve to collapse. You're not going to reinstall the sleeve, so beating it up to get it out is fully acceptable here. I have heated the sleeves to soften the old grease, and used a large flat nose screwdriver, to create an edge at the chevron, from which to encourage the sleeve to collapse. Also found that swearing and cold adult beverage resulted in a decisive technical advantage.
Regards,
Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 08:09 am:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ezuxkD8_iY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 08:24 am:

My old outer bearing sleeve was completely stuck and couldn't be removed with the sleeve-removal tool. My solution was to purchase a ball bearing from the hardware store that fit into the "dimple" hole (5/16"?) of the axle tube (that is, the hole where the sleeve locks in place). I used a hose clamp to push the bearing into the hole. This moved the sleeve inward enough to grab it with vise-grips and other tools to bend and force it out. The new sleeves insert and remove easily.

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 09:27 am:

On my last rear axle rebuild I had some stubborn sleeves. I got out my torch and used a little heat. Smoked the shop up some but not much. After cooling things down I used WD-40 and after a nudgeing with the sleeve puller the sleeves came out fairly easy.
I'll do the same thing again if the sleeves are diffulcult in another axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 10:27 am:

Part of the secret is using a long enough bar through the holes in the sleeve puller and turning the correct way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 10:39 am:

I like PJ's approach. Break it free & remove. Of course the tool is the best way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 10:43 am:

If your sleeve puller has a 1/2 inch hole in the top,I use a 3/8 extension drive that fits in and is about 3 ft long. I wedge the differential half with my feet and bump the handle(in the right direction) and usually out it comes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 11:56 am:

I had to slightly heat the axle tube to soften the 100 year old grease. Came out easily then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson. Moruya, NSW, OZ on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:05 pm:

"Thank you" for your answers Gents.
I don't have one of those pullers and if I ordered one it'd take a week to 10 days to get here and I hope to have the job finished much sooner than that.
Also, as Scott mentioned I don't need to keep the sleeves, so butchering them wont matter. (I guess I should have mentioned I'll be installing John Stoltz's sealed inner and outer bearings.) So, it looks like heat and beating them up is the way to go, and I'll take the advice and use some cold adult beverage to make the job a little easier.
Once again, "Thanks" for answering yet another of my dumb questions.
Cheers,
Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:22 pm:

Rob,

Rather than getting destructive, why not just make the tool you need. There's not much to it at all. My dad made his own out of a piece of pipe that fit nicely inside the sleeve. The pipe has a hole drilled in one end that has a spring loaded pin protruding. The pin engages the sleeve. Other end has a handle to twist & pull. You only have to make it once and you have a useful tool for life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:25 pm:

I made my own tool out of a pipe, a screw and a spring that forced the screw outwards through a hole in the pipe for the first axle I dismantled. Not so hard to make, especially if the housings are apart so the axle shaft isn't in the way. The inner sleeves may still be usable (& I think it's bad to destroy old Ford parts that still can be used..)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 04:40 pm:

Roger,

You're correct in that most inner sleeves are in very good condition.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 05:37 pm:

James you and I had the same idea. Don't fight the stiff and old hardened grease. A little heat does wonders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

Here are two photo of a home made sleeve puller. Took just a couple minutes to make and worked well.





Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Patterson. Moruya, NSW, OZ on Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 03:03 am:

Well, they're out.
With a little heat it took no time at all.
Cheers,
Rob


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration