Ford C crankshaft

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Ford C crankshaft
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 12:04 am:

What can you tell me about the Ford C crankshaft?
c
My 25 roadster daily driver finally got the best of Me. I had to open it up to see what was in there. Ford C crankshaft .007 under with what looked like new standard rods. Never filed !
I took the caps to the belt sander removed enough metal to take up the play and have at least one shim to remove in the future. Cast iron pistons.
I guess tomorrow I will have to remove a spark plug and see if it looks like two piece valves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir Atascadero on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 12:27 am:

Dean;

A belt sander will not give the flat surface to the rod cap that you desire. The surface will be rounded, more with a loose belt and high pressure, It is also difficult to make the surface per perpendicular to the bolt holes.

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 08:01 am:

Dean, years ago I took a bunch of cranks to work and checked them on a spectrometer for the material make up. Every one talks the EE so that one was the first, what I had found was EE then AA there is a C and U cranks of the 25 and up cranks the DE crank that was Canadian had close to the same metalurgy as the C and U. What I found out also was the EE formula went up into the Model A cranks so Ford must of found out a good thing and continued on with it. The older DB cranks had the worst make up for flexibility for crank shaft material, maybe that is why I have found so so many of them cracked. The EE cranks when you find them will have more of the third main wore down because they are a softer material but flex better. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Elenbaas - Granger, Washington on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

This C crank from a April 1925 engine gave me membership into the two piece crankshaft club.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 08:10 pm:

James, see the line on the crank from the grinding who ever ground it did not finish the radius to smooth it out. Some grinder will not radius there wheel, they will true the crank up and leave the old radius, then there is a line for a weak point and a crack to start. It is like scoring a glass before snapping it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Elenbaas - Granger, Washington on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 10:23 pm:

Joe I believe you are correct. This crank was ground by a young machinist about 25 years ago. The engine was assembled then sat for several years before it was used. By then I was aware of the necessity of the proper radius and always felt I was driving a potentially ticking time bomb in the crank and was unsure how the radius had been handled. It certainly sheared off clean like breaking glass on a score. At least it did not damage the block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Sunday, May 17, 2015 - 10:54 pm:

Jim,
I think we are talking different types of belt sander. I find this great for fixing badly filed caps.
be


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