Rayfield carburators?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Rayfield carburators?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel Kraft on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 12:46 am:

I've got three rayfield carburators. Google shows that they can go on a model T. What else do they fit, they look expensive, are they?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

Check with Stan Howe, the carburetor guru, He'll likely tell you they're as good as a Stromberg and he's likely to try to buy them from you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 03:05 pm:

http://www.hemmings.com/hsx/stories/2013/05/01/hmn_feature3.html

http://assets.hemmings.com/story_image/452971-1000-0.jpg?rev=2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 04:50 pm:

No I won't. They are not Model T carbs although Rayfield did make a model of accessory carb with a special manifold for T's in the teens. It used a standard L-2 Rayfield and sold very poorly.

They are an air valve type of carb. They have a little pan on the bottom which you can see in the pics that the gas that dripped down out of the manifold was supposed to be caught in. They dripped and smelled of gas.

As an aside, I just restored the Marvel carb for the 1910 Mitchell that is the centerfold in the new Horseless Carriage magazine. Also just sent a Stromberg to United Kingdom for an early Crossley. Busy.

Properly adjusted, they run very well on early engines. I have a couple running on fire engines in Germany, a G-3 and an L-5. The G-3 was NOS when I sold it to them.

The whole air valve system fell out of favor by the late teens, only Rayfield and Marvel of the larger manufacturers continued to make them. I have a dozen similar ones including a couple new old stock ones that I have never been able to sell. I've sold a few floats for them.

I'm not interested.

As an aside, I just restored the Marvel carb for the 1910 Mitchell that is the featured car in the new Horseless Carriage centerfold. Also just sent a Stromberg to United Kingdom for an early Crossley.

Busy, busy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Here's a NOS Rayfield made for the Model T from our collection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel Kraft on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 08:05 pm:

Ok, so they are clearly not model t. What would my rayfields go on?
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel Kraft on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

Stan, does that mean that they have little value?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 08:10 pm:

Stan, I am retrieving my foot from my mouth. I was under the understanding from the Rayfield that I traded you, that you thought highly of them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 08:25 pm:

While we're on the subject of Rayfield carbs, can anyone identify what kind of car would use this one? I picked it up at Hershey last year with some other T carbs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 02:00 am:

Dan, that is most likely for a tractor. The one that only shows partly on the left is a Mayer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 02:06 am:

I think highly of the Rayfield UF, it is one of the best every made for T's. Very smooth, lots of power, etc. The older Rayfields are good carbs, there is just no demand for them. They were used on many early cars, run well if the air valve setup is clean and intact, but in my world, there is no demand for them. As I said, I have some NOS ones. The later ones, especially the side drafts, are excellent carbs, a little fussy to get adjusted but fine carbs. Rayfield stuck with the air valve setup after everyone else decided it was obsolete and it was on a lot of their carbs right up to the end. The only side draft I've ever sold, I think, was one we adapted to the 1905 Fiat that was being restored for the Thailand Royal Family's collection. The original carb was missing when it was shipped to the US, we put the side draft Rayfield on it because it looked right and can be adjusted to work on a lot of various displacement engines. It ran great on that engine which is now back in Thailand on display at the Royal Museum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel Kraft on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 05:28 pm:

Here are some other carburetors


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 05:50 pm:

Schebler D's are ubiquitous for early cars. In their day, they were very good carbs.

The R is later, used on larger cars up through probably 16 or a little later.

The last one is a Lukenheimer for early one cylinder cars or more likely for single cylinder hit and miss engines. It could be quit valuable. If it were mine I would probably put it on ebay under the hit and miss or flywheel engines category.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Mokelumne Hill, Calif. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:04 pm:

That top Schebby looks identical to one I sold on Ebay a few years ago. It sat on my uncle's fireplace mantle for decades with a cigarette sticking out of the 90* brass fitting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

My understanding is that any of the Scheblers with the sliding throttle were used primarily on stationary engines and my experience with the Lukenheimer is on smaller type single cylinder 2 cycle engines like drag saws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 10:43 pm:

My 1908 Reliable Dayton high wheeler uses a Schebler Model D as its stock carb. It is a one inch pipe thread size with a butterfly throttle plate. The slide valve type was usually used on either stationary engines (hit miss engines) or marine engines. The butterfly type was usually for automobiles or throttle governor type stationary engines. Notice I say "usually" as there are exceptions...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 11:15 pm:

The Schebler D used on the 1903 - 1905 Ford A, C & F all used the butterfly type throttle control. At least every one I have rebuilt for those applications in the last ten or twelve years does. Many if not all of the Sears engines use a butterfly but I have one in here for an early Reo that uses the "chicken slicer."

The slide valve tends to idle much better than the butterfly in my experience.

George Schebler invented the float type carburetor and partnered up with Wheeler to market it. It was instantly successful and adopted by many manufacturers. In 1912, 11 years after he founded the company, Schebler sold out his interest in the company to Wheeler for a Million dollars cash. They had done well. The first Indianapolis 500 mile race was partially bankrolled by Schebler and he presented the trophy to the winner (or supposed winner).

The genius of the Schebler Model D was that it could be configured as a side draft or up draft merely by changing the positions. It could also be bolted up to an intake at the flange or screwed on to an intake pipe that had the throttle operation installed in the pipe (like the early Sears) The carb could be removed with the two bolts on the flange without removing the adapter flange from the pipe. It also allowed the same body to be used with various sizes of pipe thread flanges. I have had at least 5 different sizes of bodies with the D design.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 11:19 pm:

The Schebler D used on the 1903 - 1905 Ford A, C & F all used the butterfly type throttle control. At least every one I have rebuilt for those applications in the last ten or twelve years does. Many if not all of the Sears engines use a butterfly but I have one in here for an early Reo that uses the "chicken slicer."

The slide valve tends to idle much better than the butterfly in my experience.

George Schebler invented the float type carburetor and partnered up with Wheeler to market it. It was instantly successful and adopted by many manufacturers. In 1912, 11 years after he founded the company, Schebler sold out his interest in the company to Wheeler for a Million dollars cash. They had done well. The first Indianapolis 500 mile race was bankrolled by Schebler and he presented the trophy to the winner (or supposed winner).

The genius of the Schebler Model D was that it could be configured as a side draft or up draft merely by changing the positions. It could also be bolted up to an intake at the flange or screwed on to an intake pipe that had the throttle operation installed in the pipe (like the early Sears) The carb could be removed with the two bolts on the flange without removing the adapter flange from the pipe. It also allowed the same body to be used with various sizes of pipe thread flanges. I have had at least 5 different sizes of bodies with the D design.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 11:21 pm:

Sorry about the double post, we are having a thunderstorm and the internet has been going off and on. Going to unplug it and go back to the shop for a few more hours tonight.


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