1918 Model T Ford 2 Door Sedan

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1918 Model T Ford 2 Door Sedan
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Walker on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 01:49 am:

application/x-zip-compressedOdometer
Outlook.com.zip (124.8 k)

My dad just passed away at 89 years old. He bought this car in the early forties for $5 from someone's barn. This was his college car. He said the cigar burn in the driver's seat was from the original owner. I don't know how many owners this car had. I've attached the ODO and the engine serial number is 2495295 which is on the title. He told me the car is original. How do I start to find a value for this car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n Los Angeles CA on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 03:02 am:

Got any currant pics ??? We could probably get you a close approximation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 05:16 am:

1918 sedans are called "Centerdoor sedans" since the doors are placed a bit back between the front and rear seats. The most important question concerning the value is the condition of the wood in the body. There are lots of wood in such a body and replacing it is a major project.


wood structure


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Walker on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

Thank you for your comments. There is a lot of "stuff" in it and on it. When I get the car out in the open I'll send photos and check out the condition of the wood.
Very helpful.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 09:23 am:

Here is the picture that was in the zip file that Steve attached to his post.

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 09:51 am:

Steve a way to determine the condition of the body and if its still structurally sound (which it sounds like it is), is if the doors open and shut fairly well and they don't drag and bind.

The closed car bodies of Model T closed cars as others have stated have a wood structure which can deteriorate over time. If it does that the wood joints and structure gets loose and start to sag.

Sounds like you have a survivor T which is still mostly original. Which is great!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Walker on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 01:19 pm:

More photos of 1918 Model T. Any guidance on asking price is appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Walker on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 01:21 pm:

I can't get to the driver side door but the passenger side works O.K. It's still up on jacks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 03:14 pm:

The car has cowl lamps, which are an indicator that it could be a pre-starter model (although starters were often added later). Starters first showed up on closed cars model Ts early in the 1919 model year. The cowl lamps were originally oil burning, these however appear to be after-market electric replacements. It is also possible that the lamps were not original to the car at all and themselves may have been added. It also has at least one demountable front wheel which was first available in 1919 from Ford.
The front bumper is an interesting after-market accessory.
Current dollar value is a bit tough to estimate. As a restorable center-door sedan, the value depends a lot on the condition of the wood, as well as maybe the condition of the upholstery and mechanics. If the paint is the best feature of the car? Value could be as low as about $2000. If the wood is good and solid? Value would likely be double that.
To make it more confusing, there is more and more interest in what are known as "preservation" vehicles. these are unrestored cars that have enough original characteristics in good enough condition to want to be preserved in their unrestored state. The better things like original paint and upholstery are, the more desirable the car is. The paint on what I can see of your car is not fantastic, but good enough to be considered as a preservation vehicle. The upholstery is the big question.
Values on preservation vehicles are very difficult to estimate. Depending on a number of condition issues, and the unpredictable nature of multiple people wanting the same car? Value can be anywhere from the same as a restorable car, on up to two or three times as much. But don't count on that. It doesn't usually happen, just sometimes.
A general valuation should be about $5000 as is, maybe a bit less, possibly somewhat more depending on the unknowns. Nice restored center-door sedans currently sell for around $10K to as high as $18K depending upon just how nice they really are. It could easily cost anywhere from $10K to $25K to restore your car to that condition.
It looks like a good car, and deserves a good home!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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