A Question about Spindle Bolts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: A Question about Spindle Bolts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay Ogle on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 07:50 am:

I removed the front axle from my 1924 Fordor sedan this past weekend as the spindle bolts need replacement as well as all the other bushing. My question is that when I screwed a new spindle bolt in the axle there was approximately .030” play in the lower section. When I snug up on the spindle bolt, the play goes away. Is this a problem? There is no apparent damage to the threads, just loose. The other side of the axle has the same problem. Also the play between the spindle bolt and the upper section of the axle is approximately .015”. I can’t find any information in the MTFCA Repairing and Restoring the Model T Front and Rear Axle guide. Any thoughts?There is approximately .030" looseness here.There is approximately .015" looseness here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 07:56 am:

Hey Jay - they made a tool back in the day for this exact issue. The Stevens Front Axle tool.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/423279.html?1410127158

Send Dan Hatch a PM for the tooling and inserts info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

Our friends across the pond with Airbus call holes like these "ovality". Here in the south we refer to it as "oblongity" or "walleredoutedness". The fix is bush the upper hole. Follow the previous advice and contact Dan Hatch as he has the fixture to ream and install the inserts. Without that fixture it's going to take a vertical mill.

I wouldn't listen to for one second to options to weld a bur in that hole to push the bolt back over. That type fix will be as effective as a fart in a windstorm. Last about as long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 10:14 pm:

Gary, don't hold back.... I like that effective comment... Dan has my front axle which needed more done to it than I would have ever been able to do..... Hope to get it back soon but he is a busy man..... I enjoyed visiting Dan and his shop. Gosh he has so many parts, equipment, cars and more that was just overwhelming. Super nice and informative person.... Chet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee - Downeast Maine on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 07:31 am:

Jay - add your location to your name and maybe there is a tool near you that would be willing to repair those. I've done a few here for club members...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 08:04 am:

I always have a contrarian opinion and in this case I have another. If it isn't severe, as in this case, don't waste time and money (and agony) on rebushing and inserts. A new king pin and brass bushings are probably in order, but the axle is essentially Ok as is. Upon assembly apply Loctite Threadloc to the bottom threads and green Loctite to the upper. None of this is critical and will serve as long as you live. Think about it...what can possibly happen? Think!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:24 am:

I agree with John McGinnis on this one. The amount of wear as shown is not worth worrying about in my book. Installing new bushings and king pin bolts will keep the axle going from now on in this life.
It will take much more 'wallowedoutness' than that to cause any shimmy or wobble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 10:26 am:

I hear what John and John are saying, but, while you have it all apart, fix it right. It'll last WAY longer that way. If you're like me, anything you know about that you let go will just eat at you until you do fix it. You'll think about it every time you get in the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 12:32 pm:

When you drew the king pin all the way in its full diameter will
minimize any clearance at the bottom. If your threads are truly good you don't have a problem at the bottom. You need to
shim the top with steel shim stock. I would not use Loctite as if it fills the clearance and sets up you will need to heat both ends with a torch to get it loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 01:48 pm:

Ted,
Well, if it is working then what is wrong with heating it up?
Seth,
Probably not the best to spook people with your notions of what they should think about. Why not tell them that that fix is solid and will pose no problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 01:54 pm:

John, Sorry if I was unclear. The Stevens Tool is the right fix for the job and is a solid repair.

What I meant was that if Jay knows about the looseness of the king pins, and just decides to ignore it for now - that's a valid approach, especially with budget concerns. It's not that bad wear-wise.

For me personally, if I had an issue like that, it would bother me and I would think about it being that way every time I got in the car. Your mileage on what would bother you may vary.


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