OT- Wildest Looking Car from the 50's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT- Wildest Looking Car from the 50's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 06:30 pm:

We were out for a Sunday drive, passing by a restaurant, my wife noticed this 55 Crown Vic. We checked it out, and the car is absolutely gorgeous. Looks much better in person than it does in pictures. What was really nice about it is the owner didn't hang a stupid continental kit on it and mags to ruin the look of this beautiful car. Ford sure put some wild cars out in this era, which of course are highly sought after today.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 06:39 pm:

Well, the wife's has a continental kit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 06:50 pm:

I had a 54 in my High School days. Blew the straight six so I dropped a 312 V8 T-Bird engine from a junk yard in it. Wish I still had that car. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Crown Victorias of the mid sixties were and are beautiful and rank with 55-57 Chevy Bel Air hardtops as some of the most beautiful, valuable, and desirable cars of that era. The wide stainless steel band over the top, actually made the Crown Vic a "post" type sedan, and Ford offered a similar model without the stainless band and post, called the Victoria hardtop. My brother's first car was a two tone Flame Red and Corenthian White 57 Sunliner convertible with matching red and white insert interior. He added Smithy mufflers to it and got quite a few tickets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:05 pm:

Dan - Pictures like those beauties that you (& Gary) posted give me warm feelings about those great cars during my high school days,......and then I think of the dentist! Ugh......!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:12 pm:

Here's a "wild thought" that probably doesn't make sense, but I'd love to have that '56 with a warmed over '53 or maybe slightly earlier flathead V8 in it! Wouldn't that make for lots of "under hood discussion" at the local Friday night "show-n'-shine"! That'd be one of my favorite Fords with one of my favorite engines in it! (nothing sounds quite like a Ford flathead V8!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:14 pm:

Oh,....I should have said,...."with a pair of Smitty's of course"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ivan Warrington on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

I did the same with mine. T Bird engine. Smithies of course. Those were the days friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Albert Belling on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 09:51 pm:

This is another beautiful car made my Ford. It came out of a junkyard. Took me 3 years to put it make together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 10:28 pm:

Had this 55 for several years. Sold it to a guy from Indy area last year. Too many toys.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 10:43 pm:

Harold, what '56? The pictures were of '55 Fords.
You'd probably like a Canadian '54, they still used the flat head in '54 up there.
My daily driver work truck is a '51 F1.
I drive with one eye on the road and one eye checking the two temperature gages.
One stays on 160, the other stays on normal.
Those buggers are know to crack the blocks very easily.
I wish I had any over head valve engine in mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 01:31 am:

Aaron - Right your are! Those are '55's of course! I really am getting old, as I know those '50's cars better that any of the new ones,....I just have too many "senior moments"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:51 am:

I think all brands reached their peak in styling in 55/56. Ford Motor Company was above the rest in styling and innovation.
Harold, I love the Flatheads as much as you do, but you can't beat the performance of a 312. You are right, nothing sounds like a Flathead.
Albert, You are right. Here is a picture of my 54. I almost put a Sun Valley roof on it, but the car is to original.
Aaron, If you have cooling problems with your Flathead, the cause is most likely crud around the back two cylinders in the water jackets, and the radiator. It needs to either be replaced or rodded. Boiling it out will do nothing. I have some Flatheads and they will run all day at 70 mph without any cooling problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 09:55 am:

My dad had a rose / white 1956 Crown Victoria when I was in high school. The forward half of the roof was a tinted glass panel. It was miserably hot here in Texas. Not one of my favorite cars. The 272 and Ford - O - Matic were anemic, the suspension was better than our '53 Ford but still wallowed on any kind of bumpy road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 11:32 am:

Fomoco had it's moments, but were vastly outclassed in styling and engineering
by most other makes. My ex loved Fords, and as a result, I restored a 53, 56, 57,
59, and finally a 66. All were sloppy dogs in terms of go-fast, brakes, and handling
compared to cars like my DeSoto, except for the 66. By then, Ford had figured out
how to build a car. For the most part, Ford's styling motif was to build blobs (56 and
earlier) and boxes (57-59) and simply hang gee-gaw on the sides and corners to "put
lipstick on a pig". The 55-56 design worked pretty well, but it is still just a rounded
blob with a bunch of trim to dress it up. The 57 got some definite shape (my vote
for best aesthetic design), but mechanically they were lame. 58 and 59 were absurd
exercises in pointless , excess and ill-fitting bling AND they were lame !

Sadly, most car guys are brand loyal and refuse to look at their make of choice with
an objective eye for aesthetics. I missed my 20-year-class reunion, but got a little
book in the mail with scribblings from all the attendees. I was pleased to read that
every last kid I went to school with had "wonderful" spouses and "beautiful" children.
Not a single bad marriage, and not a single ugly kid in the bunch !!!

I guess all those bad relationships, divorces, and ugly kids come from "somewhere
else" !

Pretty much the same thing when it comes to guys and their favorite brand of cars.

Yeah ... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Mokelumne Hill, Calif. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 05:54 pm:

When I think WILD I have to include these...



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:31 pm:

Beautiful Fords?
Here is my list:
1906 K Gentleman"s Roadster
1909-10 Model T Touring
1931 Model A Standard Roadster
1932 Model B (4cly) Roadster
1934 3 window Coupe
1936 3 window coupe
1939 Coupe
1955 Crown Victoria
1957 Thunderbird
1965 Mustang


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 08:00 pm:

We had a 52 Crown Vic when I was in Jr.Hi. Black and white and real slick. We also had a 56 Dodge Texan 2 dr hardtop. We have a farm and after my Father quit driving the 56 Dodge hardtop he used it to store feed and salt blocks for the cattle in its trunk.

After he passed away my Mother asked me to move the 56 Dodge. After thinking I was going to restore it on my way out to the place I changed my mind as the salt blocks and old feed had eaten the trunk and rear quarter panels almost away. Oh well!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 08:19 pm:

I have lots of high school car regrets. I had a 55 turquoise over white Ford Sunliner convertible that was the best car you could ever want when you were out quail hunting. It attracted the most quail of any car on the road. Got rid of that and had a 40 Ford Delux Coup with a full house 48 Merc engine in it. That was a very fast car. Then got into 56 small block Chevy stuff that I raced with my brother Pat. The Chevy's would easily outrun the Ford but not when it came to quail. The Convertible was by far superior in that department. Those were the days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:06 am:

"We had a 52 Crown Vic when I was in Jr.Hi."

No you didn't. You may have had a '55 or '56 Crown Vic or a '52 Victoria, but not a '52 Crown Vic. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:43 am:

Dan; I said one temp gage stays at 160F the other stays at normal, in the middle. That's even on hot days. What's wrong with that?
I have not added to the radiator in years. Years!
But having owned flat head Fords since 1951 (a '33) I know what happens to them when you run one dry.
I have tried to replace the '52 Merc engine in a customer's car for about 6 years now. I have bought several engines, maybe four or five, and they were all cracked. Every damned one. I gave up.
It is sometimes easy to understand why so many 'just drop a Chevy in it'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 01:32 am:

I am the guy who kept all those great cars of my youth. Still have my
58 Fireflite convertible, and 66 Coronet convertible. Hell, I still have my
Schwinn Stingray and skateboard from back then, and though I probably
look a little silly, I still enjoy riding them ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 02:38 am:

Some of those engines were cracked since new with no ill effects and nobody ever noticed until now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TOM on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 06:52 pm:

Burger, They stopped making that blob in 58 or 59 Great car??? Yea right


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 10:29 pm:

Aaron, I guess I misunderstood, I thought you were worrying it would overheat. I did go through three blocks to come up with a good one for my 36, but I have never had problem with 49-53s. Over the years I've come up with a good stock of 49-53 Ford&Merc engines. Darel, I like your list. Of course every one has there own preference. Mine for The T era is 24&14 tourings, then 28-29 A phaetons, 36s almost any body style, same with 39s. 41 business coupe, 46-48 sportsman, converts and wagons. Then the 50s, where do you start? All Fords to 59, all Mercs to 58, Sunliners, Sunvallys, Crown vics, Retractibles, Montereys,Montclairs, Crestliners, T-birds. The 60s start out with the Starliner, 63-65 Fastbacks, Falcon Sprints, Mustangs, Mark Lincolns,and many many others. No other car company comes close to giving us such a wide selection of collectible vehicles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 01:15 am:

TOM,

I would not characterize any post-1954 DeSoto as a "blob". Do a little Google image
search there, Amigo.



The last DeSoto rolled off the line 30 November, 1960. It was a 1961 2 door hardtop.

As for it being a great car, I guess this is all subjective. But a few facts bear themselves
out. The Wedge block engines 350-361-383-413-426-440 are legendary for both performance
and reliability. It all started with the 1958 DeSoto. The Torqueflite ? Another automotive
legend. Torsion bar suspension began with the 57 models and ultimately swept the industry.
I would put my DeSoto against ANY 50's Ford for acceleration, cornering, and braking. I've
owned a pretty fair number of nice FOMOCO cars from the 50's. There simply is no comparison.

Don't read me wrong, ... I like almost all old cars. They are American history and all have some
neat points to recommend them. But one is historically ignorant to be unaware of the splash
Virgil Exner put upon the Detroit waters with his designs. Just as the Model T sold well due to
being cheap, it was no Packard or Locomobile. Same goes for the 50's. Ford's business model
was to sell low-end cars to people who did not expect much. To remain competitive, they
tried to stay with the styling trends as cheaply as possibly, but were still delivering anemic
powertrains, suspension, and braking systems when compared to other pricier makes.
Even Edsel, Mercury, and Lincoln wallowing and sloth-like for the times. I'd love to own
another 58-59 Lincoln convertible, and a 60 T-Bird ragtop is a favoritie of mine, ... but to
own one means to accept their design limitations or live in denial.

But cheap sells. For 1958, a Fairlane convertible went out the door for a hair over $2500.
Comparatively speaking, a 1958 Fireflite convertible set the buyer back over $5K equipped
as mine is. And comparatively speaking, Ford sold nearly 50,000 convertibles in 1958. At
the higher price bracket, only 474 Fireflite ragtops found buyers that year. Most people never
even saw one when they were new. Six are known to survive today. Four of that total have
been exported to Sweden.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 08:52 am:

Here's my choice for a favorite "wild looking car from the 50s"



I like pre-war Fords, but post war and especially 1955+ I'm a Chevy guy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 11:56 am:

OK, ... gotta just throw this one out there .... why do SO MANY
old car guys only think in terms of Ford or Chevy ?

Is it my A.D.D., or does anyone else just get bored of seeing the
same cars over and over and over and over and over and over .... ?

Where are the Hudsons and Studebakers and Pontiacs and Imperials ?
In this way, even Lincolns and Mercurys are a refreshing break from the
monotonous line of Fords and Chevys !

As mentioned above, I love a 57 Fairlane, a 55 Chevy, but when you
see multiples of each at ANY car event, doesn't anyone else have their
eyes glaze over and that funky Rambler wagon starts to look real interesting ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Hoffman - Mokelumne Hill, Calif. on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 01:09 pm:

OK, if you mean WILD, here they are
http://rense.com/general96/fab.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 01:11 pm:

For me, it's what I grew up with. I spent countless hours as a kid pretending to drive the '55 Chevy project-car Dad had in the back of the shed. The Model kits I built as a kid were all Fords and Chevys. I spent some of my high-school days driving Dad's '68 Camaro and working on my own '69 Chevelle. I met my wife while cruising around in my '66 El Camino.

Popularity breeds more popularity. Ford and Chevy sold the most cars, so that's what more people grew up with and have fond memories of.

I like all cars, but my passion is pre-war Fords, Chevy muscle, and late model GM high-performance cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

I liked the mid 50's Fords and Mercurys but my favorites were the 53 and 54 Studebaker hardtops. Still don't have one and likely never will. Had a few mid 50's Fords though - cheap and easy to get parts for at the time (60's to mid 70's). Don't have room for more toys after my T coupe and speedster and getting the Volvo PV544 my wife loved back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, May 23, 2015 - 10:56 pm:

I finally figured it out!

The Crown Vic's in the first and second posts are Pepto bismal wanna bees


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 11:41 am:

I agree with Dan on continental kits. That '55 is beautiful. The ugliest car made in the '50s has to be the 1959 Chev.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Dingler, Crowley Texas on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 01:47 pm:

Burger, Walt,
You guys think like I do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 04:40 pm:

Walt - Gotta' agree with you on the "Studies"! One of the most beautiful cars I ever saw was an early '60's black (with red leather interior) Grand Turismo Studebaker. Also, I've been accused in the past of having a liking for a lot of the "oddballs", and I guess that's true. To this day, I'd like to have a nice clean '49, '50' or '51 Hudson. Good car, and as popular as chopped '49, '50 and '51 Mercurys were, I don't know why more Hudsons were not customized, as they had the same basic lines as the Mercury. One other "car from the past" comes to mind; a fellow I once knew, a real "car guy", had a '51 Kaiser Manhattan that he put a 350 c.u. Chev small block in, and that was a really nice car,.....great road car!

Okay,....enough,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 04:58 pm:

The 58 GM cars were so incredibly bloated - resembling a few-day-old summer roadkill -
that it is hard to see any sort of cohesive design. The 58 Chevy ranks No.1 on my list of
ugliest Chevys ever built. It was the age of extreme and excess, but Harley Earl simply
lost his mind, designing a porky bunch of bodies and slathering on the trim with a trowel.
To my eye, the 59's were a welcome relief and quite "futuristic" in their George Jetson
approach.

Back at Fomoco, I like the 55-56-57 Fords, with the 57 Fairlane topping my favorites
list for body contouring, trim, and overall cohesive design, crossed with my more favored
jet-age look that the pre-57's didn't have. But damn, did they botch that great design
in 58, and it only got worse in 59 ! However, I rank the 60 Ford as one of the prettiest and
most perfectly design-balanced cars they ever pushed out the doors.

The Edsel was great for 58, but good Lord, WTF were they thinking for 59 ??? ... a box
with appliqué grille, lights, and trim ???

Mercury was always the crazy kid on acid of the family, and did a razor walk of admirably
"out there" and too much and just plain ugly. But they were never boring.

I would rank the 56 Packard Caribbean as one the all-time best designs to ever roll out of
America, but the junior models didn't have quite the panache.

Virgil Exner was the guy who really put the boot to the posterior of Detroit design in the 50's.
The 56 Custom Royal, Fireflite, NY'er, and Imperial were stunningly cutting edge and cohesive
to the smallest detail, the 57's were a swift kick to the groin of all other makers for low profiles
and slippery design. 58 was just that much better. But like all good things, they tripped over
their own shoelaces for 59 and were a hit-or-miss operation well into the 1960's after that
clusterschtuppe.

Before 1955, it seems Detroit was still just building 40's blobs, so oddly, "the 50's" as car
design seems to be askew with the actual decade. More like a 1955-1961 "decade" for design.

Walt, .... my brother still has the 1953 Commander coupe we found in a barn in Marysville.
It was a factory promotional show car with a built-in continental kit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 06:14 pm:

Lordy, I can't imagine a continental kit on a 53 Studebaker! Probably really screwed up some otherwise fine lines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

For wild try a 1954 Kaiser Darrin, all the above mentioned cars don't even come close.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, May 24, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

58-59-60 Chevy Nomad station wagons owned by my brother Carl. 58 is his nicest one, the 59 is a parts car, and the 60 is pieced together from several cars and kind of a hotrod.

58 and 60 both have 348s in them.

I have to disagree with Burger, I think the '58 is an attractive car. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TOM on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 06:46 pm:

Burger let me enlighten you. All companies had good high performance engines, but the only American car to win at LeMans was Ford, multiple times. This race is the most grueling and severe test of speed and reliability. Torsion bar suspension? The garage I used to hang out at back in the day was always replacing torsion bars, and when the cross member that held them rusted out, that was generally the end. I realize Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, but most agree that Mopars from 1957 to 1962 were the ugliest, cheapest, and most rusted out cars on the road in that era,not to mention if it was damp or cold, forget starting it. During this time period FORD almost bought Chrysler out, but I think the government stopped it. In the end Chrysler, after a few buyouts went belly up and Obama sold them to Fiat. Ford, the only company that didn't take government welfare is still family owned. So whatever criticism of Ford you have, it doesn't bear out as they are still around in their original form. No matter what the price difference, if the 58 DeSoto convertible was such a great car, more than 475 of them would have been sold. I highly doubt that you have owned a number of Ford products or any Ford at all for that matter. There was always a Ford vs Chevy feud, Mopar wasn't any part of it until the mid sixties. Even then they were very crude and cheaply built.It seems you are stuck on Mopar like you accuse others of being stuck on their favorite brands. It's too bad members can't post something for the enjoyment of all without some troll coming out of the woodwork throwing rocks to start a controversy.You can throw more rocks amigo, but I won't waste any more time responding to your uninformed BS.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 07:14 pm:

Like has been said, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". Me? I think the '58 Chevy Impala was one of the best looking Chevy's of the era. As for the Mopar stuff, I think the 426 Hemi is what put them on the map. If they hadn't put the Cummins in the pickup, they'd have been gone long before they were. I would be the third generation GM if I had worked there. No more. My father lost 1500 shares of GM stock in that debacle. Now, I'm - or rather my wife - driving a Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 07:53 pm:

I had a friend in high school whose folks had a '58 Nomad, a 348 tri-power car. From what I could see, the only things that made it a Nomad were the extra strips of chrome and the Nomad name on the tailgate. I was not aware that they carried the name into the '59 & '60 model years, so I just learned something there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

Mike,

Nomad was the top trim-level wagon up to '61.

The Nomad name came back again from 68-72 as a Chevelle wagon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 08:37 pm:

51 Ford -chopped -channelled - frenched - side pipes - louvered hood. Flat black


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Monday, May 25, 2015 - 11:36 pm:

I figure the '59 Chevs are kind of wild too compared to most others of that era although late 50's, early 60's Cadillacs are pretty wild too.
My first car was a '59 Chev.
I loved it then and I love this one now, such as it is.......rides like a boat.......because it IS a boat....... :-O

'59 BelAir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 08:25 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 08:45 am:

Constantine what is THAT?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nowell- NJ on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 08:51 am:


My Rat Rod


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 09:36 am:

Seth, it's the car I mentioned above as my choice for the wildest car of the 50s, and may I say the winner...a 1954 Kaiser Darrin, and this one is for sale, see:

http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/carsforsale/kaiser/darrin/1739943.html?refer =blog

Note the sliding doors! Howard “Dutch” Darrin didn't muck around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 09:40 am:

Seth, it's a Kaiser Darrin Constantine had mentioned earlier


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

Burger let me enlighten you. All companies had good high performance engines, but the only American car to win at LeMans was Ford, multiple times. This race is the most grueling and severe test of speed and reliability. Torsion bar suspension? The garage I used to hang out at back in the day was always replacing torsion bars, and when the cross member that held them rusted out, that was generally the end. I realize Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, but most agree that Mopars from 1957 to 1962 were the ugliest, cheapest, and most rusted out cars on the road in that era,not to mention if it was damp or cold, forget starting it. During this time period FORD almost bought Chrysler out, but I think the government stopped it. In the end Chrysler, after a few buyouts went belly up and Obama sold them to Fiat. Ford, the only company that didn't take government welfare is still family owned. So whatever criticism of Ford you have, it doesn't bear out as they are still around in their original form. No matter what the price difference, if the 58 DeSoto convertible was such a great car, more than 475 of them would have been sold. I highly doubt that you have owned a number of Ford products or any Ford at all for that matter. There was always a Ford vs Chevy feud, Mopar wasn't any part of it until the mid sixties. Even then they were very crude and cheaply built.It seems you are stuck on Mopar like you accuse others of being stuck on their favorite brands. It's too bad members can't post something for the enjoyment of all without some troll coming out of the woodwork throwing rocks to start a controversy.You can throw more rocks amigo, but I won't waste any more time responding to your uninformed BS.

===================================================

Interesting that you would make this a personal attack and call me a troll.

I think I've been pretty clear that I like all sorts of cars, including the 50's
Fords, and given my reasons as well.

And while you may chose to publicly say you doubt I have owned the Fords
I have, well ... I just gotta say, you're a funny guy.

You have a nice day, Sir. :-)


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