16 fuel line question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 16 fuel line question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:18 pm:

I took off carb because gas overflows float seems to work when I blow in carb but I have not took off bowl yet does any one know how copper gas line seals is there packing? Around nut? Red gas tank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

Red gas tank it was soldered once


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:27 pm:

The vendors sell felt packing for the ends of the fuel line. My car has the felt and it seems to be sealing fine.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2913.aspx

The vendors also sell neoprene packing, I have no experience with it.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/2913N.aspx

Hope this helps. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:39 pm:

I have not been able to get off the line on the sed. bowl yet I got the drane valve working but the shut off is still stuck. I will let it soak a little longer I dont want to break any thing. I was wondering why tank is red but one side has been soldered. it seems funny it has a copper and brass gasket on carb. I want to find a wrench that fits bowl nut good so I dont round it off. than I will take off bowl. but it seems like float is free and working now. when I put gas in tank it ran out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 06:44 pm:

thanks Mark that is what I was wondering I didint know what was in there. I know on old valves there is string packing never would have thought of felt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Small piece of neoprene hose that will fit over the gas line and still slide up into the packing nut is what I use. I bought the 1" piece of hose at FLAPS and slice off about 1/4" to make a round neoprene seal that the fitting will crush to form the final seal. There is no fuel pump so you don't have a high pressure there - just gravity. Never had a leak there using the slice of neoprene hose for packing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 09:23 pm:

This isn't an answer to your question, but you used the magic phrase copper gas line. Some say copper tubing is particularly prone to metal fatigue and may break from vibration. I use steel brake line instead, although some say they've used copper for fifty years with never a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:01 am:

The original line was brass, not copper. Lang's has them as original. You can use steel brake line, which a lot of folks do, with good results. Copper is prone to failure at the fittings. BTW, the felt "bushing" sold by the vendors works well and is cheap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 03:25 am:

It's unlikely soaking with any liquid will loosen up the shut off on the sediment bulb. It's very easy to break off the handle when trying to force it open. When they're really stuck, I've always had to use heat. Of course the sediment bulb has to be unscrewed from the tank + the cotter pin, washer and spring holding the conical shut off in also removed before heat is applied. Don't point the flame towards the same point of the brass parts for long periods, they can melt. Heat the cast iron instead until dull red and let it cool off - then everything will unscrew easily. The vendors sells the lead packing for the large fitting too - you may want to take it off to clean and check the innards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 03:27 am:

Here is another text about repairing the sediment bulb from the encyclopedia:
http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/SedBlb.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 10:22 am:

I KNOW it isn't original, but I put a copper gas line in my car over 50 years ago, and it's still in it. I've driven the car well over 50,000 miles. When I did my '13 roadster, I put a brass line in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 11:50 am:

I never heard of brass tubing I assumed it was copper. I will have to take a better look. the nut on the tube turns but the line is froze to the nut I cant get off the sed. bulb with out taking off line when I get bulb off I can heat with torch and get it apart. the bulb is cast iron


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:05 pm:

I had a copper line on my accessory mag post oiler the crystallized and snapped at the fitting on the front on the engine from vibration. If another motorist at a stop light didn't clue me in that oil was pouring out from under my car the engine would have been toast. Using copper is chumming for trouble, Why play beat the reaper?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, May 22, 2015 - 12:58 pm:

Just cut the line and remove the sediment bowl. Install a new line when going back together.

Look at the link Roger posted. Paragraph 4 tells how to get a stuck shut off valve out. I made a special tool for that. Seems like I've seen one for sale on one of the vendor sites, too, but the socket idea will probably work just fine. You just don't want to beat up that 'turned down' section of the valve stem where the spring and cotter pin go. It will mushroom and be useless after that.


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