Tudor project in Reno

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Tudor project in Reno
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Mundt on Saturday, June 06, 2015 - 05:30 pm:

Hi, Well here goes. I'm new to this forum (any forum) and model T's.

Quick background:
On Memorial day we transported my Great-grandpa's first car to Reno. It's a 1926 Tudor (unless you tell me otherwise). It has been in my grandpa's barn for something like 55 years. It last ran when I was about 11 (30 years ago) we pull started it and ran around Firth Idaho for an hour (then it went back in the barn). I would guess Grandpa drained things and did that correctly.

The Plan:
We live in Reno(Hot August Nights is here), So, I was thinking we would cut off the cab (at dash level) and put in a 350 Chevy engine.




Just Kidding....

I would like some real input on how to even start, how much to restore and how much to leave original.

Is there anyone in the Reno area that could Mentor me on this?

I'd like to make this car very nice, so I can give to one of my kids in 39 years (when I'm 80 and dead). I'd like to run it for a week each summer prior to that. I figure I can put about $5-7,ooo into it for each of the next 3 years without my wife stopping me.

Thanks Jason


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Saturday, June 06, 2015 - 05:37 pm:

Someone will be along shortly to post "How to take a Model T out of mothballs." It's a good read and details the bare minimum to get it on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, June 06, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

That looks like a nice, rust free car. I'd have to see more pictures of it to determine if it is really an unrestored car or a if it has the typical 1940s/1950s "treatment."

For now, clean and detail it, fix those items that need to be repaired and replace and install any missing parts (like the missing hubcaps).

Play with the car and have some fun with it for a few years. After that, decide if you really want to restore it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, June 06, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Saturday, June 06, 2015 - 11:47 pm:

Jason there is an active chapter in Washoe Valley. Check the chapter listing for contact info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 12:51 am:

Jason, Milt Webb constructed the article in that link on getting a T out of "mothballs". He is super knowledgeable guy and covers all the details. He's in our club and lives in Elk Grove. Have fun with the car. If it were mine, it would stay exactly the way it is and fix only the things that need it... to make it "durable" and safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n Los Angeles CA on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 02:46 am:

My car is an older restoration and taking on a nice patina. People love it as is and no worries over the paint with kids around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 03:01 am:

The moth ball article is very detailed, though it omitts one important factor about the rear axle thrust washers. They were made out of lead babbitt that tends to crumble with age which can lead to sudden brake malfunction.. Repro thrust washers made of bronze are recommended and when test driving before the inside of the rear axle is checked, be ready to use the emergency brake if needed. Well, it's a good plan to always have the emergency brakes working and be prepared to use them should anything in the drive line fail.

The club's manuals are good investments, they show how to fix Model T's with parts available today.

(Message edited by Roger K on June 07, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 07:22 am:

Jason,

Great first post ...

Nice picture placement - I read about the chop & Chevy engine & thought ...

" He is going to get eaten alive. "


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 11:46 am:

If you bring it back to Firth, I would help you. Great looking car the way it is. You got my heart thumping with the cut off cab and the Chevy engine.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Wheeler , Carson City, NV on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 01:27 pm:

Jason I just restored a 1925tt a newbie at best I did join the local club Silver State Chapter of the Model t ford Club a wealth of information , for me. Contact Claude Church @775-721-7955 Treasurer, good luck Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, June 07, 2015 - 11:12 pm:

Jason here in sparks nv reno so close the hell you can see sparks working on tt truck but been working on model ts all my life i sent you a private message


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Mundt on Monday, June 08, 2015 - 02:03 am:

Hi and Thanks for the input, looks like there are some very nice local mentors for me to contact.

I read over the "moth ball to get started link". That will keep my busy for a while. I agree with the direction of fixing only what is broken or missing.

I removed the hood and yes there is still an engine inside and battery box (wood batteries wow). I could use a little help, when I tried jumper cables nothing would crank over.



(OK, not as funny as the first posting)

The next step, cooling system:
I figure it's simple and needed, out in the open and easy to do with minimal reading up.

I recall the radiator has several holeS. You see a water pump (without belt connection) making things worse. I've read lots of posts and think I'll go for removal of the pump and back to original setup and a new radiator. If not too many of you object to this course of action.

The pump notes "Rush pat pend" I'd give it to any of you that want it. I've seen some collection pictures on this site.

The radiator (with small holes ), is not original, a honeycomb (which does look cool but trouble to fix and deal with I read). I understand that Bergs is the good stuff to put in. The old radiator I'd give to any you you that want it, it's stamped with "E-2-34" and something like "SHE***AM". Lastly is the chicken wire covering original?



Radiator parts I'm planning to buy:
From Bergs- flat tube 4 row 8 fin/inch $825
From Lang's- hose set 39445 $9.50, clamps 6x 39455 $5.5, lower pipe brass 12" 3939BR $29.55, lower engine manifold connection 3015 $28.95, bolts 2x 3016 $.85, gasket 3018 $3018 $.35

More car background:
From the original Title (I'm holding as I type this). Production number 14,561,332 Issued to H.F. Lott 12.19.36 that would be my great grandpa Hyrum Franklin Lott (1/14/1889 to 12/15/1949). So, while it may have been his first car, he was not the first owner of the vehicle. The passenger side frame has the same number (good not stolen by grandpa). The engine above the water pump is different 14578683.

thanks Jason


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, June 08, 2015 - 02:54 am:

A new radiator saves you from a lot of potential troubles. You may get by with an original radiator - I've got one - but the chances are high they're a cause for never ending trouble. A good radiator repair man may be able to change the core for a little less than what a new costs, but it's hard to find a good repair shop nowadays when all the moderns has alu/plastic radiators..

The frame/title number is a late november 1926 date. That's almost four months and 500,000 cars into 1927 production, so Ford would have called it a '27. A good sign it's a '27 is the headlamp mountings - it's directly to the cross bar between the fenders, while a '26 would have the headlamps mounted to the fenders. Most '26:s didn't have any cross bar.

The state may have titled it as a '26 if it was registered before the end of december '26.

The original engine may have developed a problem and was swapped to a very early december '26 engine, made only about a week from the original. No worries since matching numbers isn't as important for a Model T's value as it can be for other types of collector cars.

I suppose you have a vaporizer carb? Sometimes they were changed out since they can be hard to start and a bit harder to repair than the earlier NH.


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