OT. Your English... Our English?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT. Your English... Our English?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Found this in the back of an 1922 owners manual.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 07:55 am:

Kinda reminds me Steve Martin in one of his comedy routines when he said "It's like those French, they have a different word for everything!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 08:36 am:

"We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language."

Oscar Wilde, The Canterville Ghost (1887)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 09:16 am:

Wasn't it Churchill who said we were two nations divided by a common language?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 09:58 am:

USA and UK

2 Countries divided by a common language


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 11:27 am:

I speak both and I still get confused, so do my friends...
Another area of confusion is baby stuff. We had our children in the USA, for the second my Mother came from the UK to help. My wife and Mother had all kinds of fun...
Nappy- diaper
Crib - cot
Bassinet - crib
It goes on and on...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 11:47 am:

America has the original English language! :-)In fact the more isolated regions speak the "King James Version"! For many years we were isolated from the continent by the Atlantic Ocean. So we kept the language pure. However, the English were very close to the continent and their language got corrupted by Spanish, French, German, Swedish, Dutch etc. Now that transportation has improved, our American language is becoming corrupted too. You will even notice that regional dialects are beginning to fade away. :-)
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 11:47 am:

There were many Hupmobiles exported to Australia.

They were and still are great, high quality and dependable automobiles.

My dad had a 1927 six cylinder sedan with less than 10,000 miles on it. One of the nicest, unrestored antique cars around.

He also shipped some 26-27 Hupmobile parts to Australia years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 11:47 am:

The RH list is mostly correct for England, except for:
Crank Chamber - never heard it; we say crankcase
Sparking plug - we just say spark plug
Carden gears - we might say carden shaft, but mostly just drive-shaft
Push and pull rod - never used. But I don't understand drag link either, given that that the link is across the car! But in most cars, the drag link does run fore-and-aft, which makes more sense
Side brake - not used.
Crown gear is the driven gear (crown-wheel), not the drive gear (pinion)
Induction system - we just use inlet manifold
Skew gears - only called that when they are 'skew'!

Now, what about 'cotter pin'? That's a taper pin of the type which was used to attach bike pedals. The pins on the Model T are 'split pins'.
And our cars have windscreens, not windshields.

Now I'm off to eat a tomato - which rhymes with oregano, but not potato, and is coloured red, and I'll listen to Zed Zed Top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 11:56 am:

Thanks Chris you got a Zee Zee top in my head so now I'm pulling out the eliminator album and throwing it on the turn table. Yes I still have several.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 12:10 pm:

Interesting about spark plug. I have motocycle (think Hendee-Indian) and car literature including Austin, BSA, MG, and Triumph shop manuals and related literature from the 40's, 50's, and 60's where the discussion is on the sparking plug. Any thoughts where the English went from a sparking plug to a spark plug?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

here in the U.S. I always INSTALLED new air filters and spark plugs, except when I worked at British Motor Car Dist. in San Francisco. There we had to FIT them. Even though they were made correctly and went right in we still had to FIT them. And the Brits did call them sparking plugs.
The shop foreman and many of the mechanics were from the other side of the pond.
Oh, and when one of them was driving here from N.Y. his generator PACKED UP. He had to FIT a new one.
I never heard of a storage battery being called an ACCUMUTOR.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 12:19 pm:

OK, accumulator (see above).

Also, on every service we had to put a SPOT of oil in every dash pot.
New CONACTS also required a new CAPACITOR.
I was more used to points and condenser.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

Norman, I was interested in your point about the English language being preserved by the isolation of the US from outside influences. That's in parallel the preservation of the Ligurian honeybee introduced to Kangaroo Island off our South Australian coastin the 1800's. They are the only pure strain of honey bee left in the world according to bee keepers. Quarantine laws are in place to protect that status.

But I take issue with the US being the preserver of the English language! You can't blame outside influences for the current propensity to drop "to be" from "The car needs to be restored".

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 08:29 pm:

When I hear, "The car needs restored" I just figure the person is showing off their illiteracy.
Nobody that I know talks that way. I have heard it though.
I have also heard a few thousand people say they seen the car before it done got restored and they seen it while it was getting restored and there aint nothing wrong with it now, 'cept it aint got no papers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 09:32 pm:

Chris. There Are a few terms on the right side column that are not common language here in Australia. They may have been in 1922 though.
Erik. These are my two Hupps, a '22 R and '26 A.
I love my T but the build quality is way behind these.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

.......and then there's then and than! So many people say things like,....they seen this rather then that, when they mean rather THAN that! Both of those mistakes (seen instead of saw, and then instead of than) are because we speak so poorly so often that people eventually fail to realize that it's a mistake in grammar and eventually accept it as correct. It's really pitiful the way our language is deteriorating. Shouldn't get started on this I guess, 'cause it just goes on and on. One more, and then I'll quit,.....how about "these ones" and "those ones"! Eeeeesh,....makes my skin crawl! Well, I said "just one more", but I have to mention the one that "bugs" me the most! And that all this "like" talk. It started with a lot of the "teeny bopper shopping mall mentality girls" I think. Still seems to be mostly among young girls, but this is so common now,...."So I'm like, oh really?" And he's like, "absolutely,...seen it myself! And I was like, shocked! And I'm like, "hard to believe"! And so we're all like, really bummed out!

(....and I'm like,.... shut up because I'm like about ready to puke!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 10:29 pm:

And it's not just different countries that have different terms for things. This country is big enough that there are many different terms from one region of it to another. My wife and I were planting some shrubs and flowers this evening, and she (originally from Michigan) asked me to bring her a pail of mulch. We don't have pails here in the South, we have buckets. (At least I knew what she was talking about.) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin Konrad on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 12:00 am:

So who recognizes a 'drinking fountain' as a 'bubbler'???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 12:20 am:

Me.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 12:28 am:

What about that picture (pitcher) on the wall? Or that the top of the house is the roof (ruf).

Marvin, you know bubblers are found only in Wisconsin thanks to Kohler.

This biggest one I got was from traveling around Europe. Numerous people asked me why we say 'do'. example: Do you want to go to the store? Apparently in other languages you just say: You want to go to the store? The word 'do' is just an extra word we use here in the states. Is it used at all in OZ or the UK?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Borland. Bathurst. NSW. Australia. on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:06 am:

G'day Dave,

Do is used if you are an old fart, dropped if you are from the younger set.

Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rose on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:24 am:

Harold:

I am pleased that you accepted it instead of excepting it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:34 am:

Harold is right. We get so used to the wrong way that we begin to think it is correct.
But, "Where are you at" will never sound right. Nor will, "Where you at"? Can't they just say, "Where are you"? What's with the at on the end.
Same goes for, "Where is it at". "Where is it" doesn't get the job done? You gotta say, "At"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:34 am:

Personal favorites of mine from the illiteracy crowd, ... non-words, such as:

"Irregardless" and "orientate"

In a discussion with likeminded students of *reasonably* correct ingleez , my
friend Bret suggested countering with a triple-negative version of the former ...
"disirregardless", or even awkwardly extending it via improper conjugation as
"disirregardlessly.

I like to fire up to moronspeak when I encounter someone disirregardlessly orientated
in their ingleez using porpoisely anti-enfungulated constructionisms, as it were.

Don't get me started on "ghettospeak". No wut om sain, Dog ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:37 am:

How about radio announcers that say, "Are operators are standing by"?
They didn't learn to say, "OUR"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:47 am:

Burger, the second most common phrase heard in Oakland is, "You know what I'm sayin".
The first is, "Give me everything you got"!
I've had four of those sheet eatin welfare bastards stick me up at gunpoint and say that. The last time was March 16th, of this year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 02:42 am:

Aaron, I was taught to respond with "Just before the at!"
How about, "I ain't never done no wrong!" for a triple negative (which is a negative)
As for Drinking fountains, I always knew the water spout fixture itself called a Bubbler--but then Mrs. Haws stayed at our resort every summer, so maybe that influenced me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist- New Zealand on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 04:41 am:

Russell

The build quality and performance on my Hupp is definitely not as good as the equivalent 1910 T
(but I still love it)



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 05:51 am:

Ok Karl, I am now very jealous of you. What a lovely car!
I was comparing my '22 Hupp vs my '23 T when making the comparison, but to be fair you could buy 4 Model T's for the price of a Hupp in 1922!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist- New Zealand on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 07:05 am:

Russell- Hupp did make a nice car . Mine is lots of fun but performance and technology wise it is probably closer to an N than a T -Karl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 08:19 am:

Aussie, Kiwi and Brit

Aussie

Kiwi and Brit


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 09:13 am:

To Marvin Konrad: Anyone from the Boston area knows that the proper word for "drinking fountain" is bubblah. We also get our adult beverages from "the packy".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 09:47 am:

One item the original list forgot, "boot". Driving around England we were amazed at the number of "boot sales". That would be "trunk sales" to us, or fleamarkets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 11:48 am:

I had a problem when I was a boy. Some words sound very much alike and until one learns the written language he might think they are the same word. Example: are, or, our. I pronounced all three "ur". And there are some words which are spelled the same but have different meanings. read present tense read past tense. Those words are pronounced differently, but spelled the same way.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 12:46 pm:

That Boston stuff is wicked good!

How about Bah-gin for a deal at Filenes Basement
Beatah for a cheap car
Bang a left for left turn
Bulkhead for outside entrance to the cellar
Cellar for the space under the house
Pissa meaning good - sometime used with good to make a strong statement
......Such as "she's a pissa good looker!

Regular coffee coffee with cream and sugar
... not at Starbucks where we can't figure out the difference between a venti and grandi
Tonic soda - not tonic water
Frappe and it aint a milkshake which is flavored milk
Grinder for sub or hoagie
Jimmies chocolate sprinkles

Yiz - Plural form of "you." As in, "All a yiz bettah be in the cah by the time I count to fou-ah"


When the limey's come to Boston they think they are in a non-English speaking country
And they are right -- WE SPEAK AMERICAN!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

Constantine, what sort of canine aberration is that? I'd like to have him walk my perimeter at night!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Glowacki on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

My wife is British. When our daughters were growing up she always taught them the British words for certain things. When one of them was about five we left her with a baby sitter. When we got home we asked how everything had gone. The sitter said fine except that our daughter kept asking for a flannel.Whats a flannel? Oh she meant a washcloth!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:40 pm:

Fred - An 'en dare's Chicago. Dat's where dem guys chro da ball to dem udder guys, but den youse guys wouldn' know 'bout dat, woodja? Dats 'cuz youse guys are too busy "pahkn da cahs", right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 03:02 pm:

Nobody "axed" this question yet, so I will "ax" it now. Does the word doable bother anyone? When I ask if something can be done, I expect the answer to be, "yes it can be done," or "yes we are able to do it." "It's doable" doesn't sound right!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 03:37 pm:

Harold -- I understood everything you said! --- Amazing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 04:25 pm:

It's evident to me that California has no dialect, but everywhere else English is spoken or written has one.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 10:45 pm:

Jeff - "Yes it can be done", or, "yes we are able to do it" certainly does sound better than "doable". However, there are certain parts of "the South" where they would say, "well, ya' might could". That's the one that really "gets" me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 11:33 pm:

So who recognizes a 'drinking fountain' as a 'bubbler, We have them in Portland Oregon, we call them Benson bubbler's, after the man that installed them in the down town area. Except for freezing weather, they bubble all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 07:41 am:

In KY people would say "I wouldn't care to." when they meant they would do something you asked!.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John H. Nichols on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 08:26 am:

Thank you for the enlightenment. Living across the river from Brockville, Ontario, Can I always smile when I hear Shedule for schedule, and in the States, we say skedule.

John Nichols


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 08:35 am:

Harold -- Yeah, I might could. Fack a tha bidness, I'm fixin' to. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 09:57 am:

How about "this smorning" instead of "this morning" ? Or people who say "ya all" when he is only talking to me?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 11:27 am:



I believe the "corruption" of British English received a boost from GI's stationed there during the war. Before that I don't think you would have heard OK used much by British folks. That may also be when chaps became guys.

Americans listening to those posh BBC accents tend to think British announcers are more erudite than ours, but I've often heard them use media as a singular noun, and I think I've heard "orientate" more on the Beeb than in our broadcast media. Apparently their broadcasters aren't any better educated than ours, they just sound like it to us.

One of my cousins and his family lived in Australia for a few years. One of the boys told of being in a McDonald's and asking for water in his Oklahoma accent (wadder). The girl behind the counter at first didn't understand him, then said, "Oh, you mean w-tah."

I heard of an American visiting Sydney who was hit by a tram and woke up in the hospital. In considerable pain, he moaned, "Oh, did I come here to die?" The nurse replied,"Oh, no sir. You kime heah yesta-die."

The worldwide use of English produces many variations of pronunciation and usage, and sometimes you will see English subtitles on the screen when the speaker is using English, because other English speakers may not understand his accent. This is my favorite: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7Ef5Aob4cE.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 12:05 pm:

Mike - There was a similar thread to this one some time ago, and I mentioned that I'd heard someone from Texas pronounce the word business as,..."bidness" as you just did. Someone else from Texas posted that he had never heard that and didn't know what I was talking about. But you just wrote "bidness", so thank you! Someone else besides me has heard it. By the way, where I heard that was an interview someone had with A.J.Foyt, and he must have pronounced the word business as "bidness" at least a dozen times. At the time, I just thought that it must just be an "A.J. Foyt thing", but you just convinced me that it isn't just A.J. Foyt,....there must be someplace where for some reason, they say,...."bidness".

By the way, like most of the rest of this thread, it really isn't important, but I just find it interesting,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 12:33 pm:

Harold, lots of folks here in the "all bidness" hoping for prices to go up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 05:06 pm:

If those vikings had been a little more persistent, you would all talk some sort of danish and I could have written this in my native language :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 07:54 pm:

Michael D, Now, THAT is funny!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Friday, June 12, 2015 - 09:57 pm:

I'll have to count the number of times Ross Lilleker and I say; What, Huh, Excuse Me in a conversation. When an Englishman and Texan try to talk to each other, it usually turns to sign language.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 09:52 am:

Jeg taler ikke Dansk.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 10:55 am:

While on holiday in Ireland a few years back I needed a part for our car and went to a wrecking yard. The owner could not understand my Australian accent and I was getting about one word in four of his thick Irish brogue. We resorted to the point and poke method! Funny, we both thought we were speaking English!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 11:50 am:

Marvin - Here in Kenosha where I grew up, we used to have bubblers all over town.

It's fun thinking about all the differences, such as cahs in Boston, and so many others.

The one I liked was when a good friend from down south said: y'all, y'all, twice like that in the same sentence. :-)

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 12:14 pm:

Keith - There's another word (or words) that I learned years ago at a police training class that was taught by a fellow from Texas. He was an excellent instructor and a very nice fellow, and after his presentation, I was kidding him about the fact that I even learned a "new word"! The only thing I failed to ask him was whether it was just one word, or two,...??? Therefore, I certainly don't know how to write it, but it sounds something like y'all, but refers to a group of people like,...."alla' y'all".

Still not sure if that's one word or two, however, maybe it depends on whether or not you're in Texas, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 12:47 pm:

In my job I often receive calls from customers in other English speaking countries. When the customer asks about the delivery time on a part my usual reply is "about a fortnight" In 10 years I have only one customer comment on me using such a non American english term for time measurement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, June 13, 2015 - 07:17 pm:

Harold --Of course "alla' y'all" is correct Southern English. It means "everyone," rather than "summa' y'all." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, June 14, 2015 - 12:33 am:

In some parts of the USA desk is a two-syllable word, pronounced"day-usk".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, June 14, 2015 - 01:10 am:

I was born and raised in Austin Texas. I have not lived in Texas for about 35 years and would like to think that my accent has diminished. I am always amazed how many folks that I meet ask me if I am from Texas. Just today I finished a large project with a Canadian company and at the construction sign off meeting the guy that flew in from Canada to sign off on the project asked me if I was a Texan... Maybe it was when I said it was nice to do "bidness" with "y'all"?

(Message edited by paulmikeska on June 14, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, June 14, 2015 - 07:40 am:

In the south you also hear "Chester Drawers" what they are referring to is a "Chest of Drawers"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, June 14, 2015 - 04:24 pm:

My absolutely wonderful grandfather was born in Tennessee, lived for about a year in Texas as a young child, then moved with his family to Califunny at about the age of ten. He was very good at farming and quite successful at "raising" peaches in Modesto (hello Henry P!). With him, you didn't "grow" peaches, you "raised" peaches. The other thing was the "crick" that ran alongside one of the orchards. Everyone else called it a "creek".
The other interesting thing was that whether referring to the man, the city, the state, or the clothes, about half the family said "Worsh", the other half said "Wash" (Worshington, Washington). But we all knew what everyone meant.
I have always been fascinated by linguistics.
W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Nelson - Eastern Iowa on Sunday, June 14, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

How about "Put the dishes in the Zink"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Phillips on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 12:16 am:

How many of you chaps own a Model T lorry?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 01:40 am:

I had a lorry once. I named it Annie. Annie Lorry.


Okay. You can take me out and shoot me now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin Konrad on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 12:19 pm:

-Wayne-
Is it "shut", "chute", "shout", or just "shoot"??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 12:24 pm:

This isn't an England vs USA thing, but why can so many people who would have no trouble saying "the windows of my new car are clear" not manage to say 'nuclear' without it coming out as 'new-killer'?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

We've had two presidents with that affliction. Ike and Dubya both said "nucular". Why they couldn't say nuclear is unclear. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 01:13 pm:

... and in England, Miles Davis is known as Kilometers Davis. True story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 01:33 am:

When did route as in Route 66 become pronounced rout? Now they call the gizmo which sends info on the internet a router. We all know a router is a power tool used to shape timber.

I could understand it if it was the Aussies who changed root to rout, root being synonymous with f...

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Hunter, Lithgow, NSW Australia on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 02:56 am:

Well said Allan!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 07:47 am:

I think the two pronunciations of route in the US are regional. I've heard both.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 10:27 am:

Being in the parts business for many years there are several weird pronunciations that I hear over and over. Two of the most common are:

"Vacuum plates" for backing plates and
"Sell-a-noid" for solenoid.

I had an employee who said "speedonnomer" for speedometer. I often say "speedonnomer" as a tribute to him. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 10:58 pm:

Steve, Jimmy Carter said nookulur too. It always drives me nuts to hear that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 01:32 am:

A small chuckle to me. Many years ago, I went into a metal supply to get some aluminum. I told the fellow at the window what I wanted and suddenly he and the other fellow in the office looked at each other with incredulous expressions on their faces. He then turned back to me and told me I was the first customer in a week to pronounce "aluminum" correctly. I didn't think it was a difficult word.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 04:34 am:

Wayne, aluminium is not pronounced a-loo-min-um. There are two i's in the word, both being pronounced.
Do US citizens pronounce magnesium as magnesum, radium as radum, chromium as chromum, helium as helum?

Allan from down under, tounge in cheek.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 05:45 am:

Why U.K., N.Z. and Oz (and probably some others) call a fixed width device for rotating nuts a 'spanner' dates back to the 1500's. The device then called a spanner, was designed to wind the spring on the newly invented wheel-lock firearm (a bit like winding a clock with a key, but the spring was stronger)The word probably came from the then fairly common use of 'span' being the past tense of 'spin'.

It is interesting that the word 'wrench' is applied in those countries to two-jawed gripping devices, also used for turning, such as a 'pipe wrench' or 'monkey wrench'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 05:55 pm:

Allan - It's not quite that simple. There's the American spelling (aluminum) and the British spelling (aluminium) and there would naturally be two different pronunciations. Not trying to "argue", just (hopefully) trying to help,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 08:15 pm:

You are right Harold. It is not simple. Why someone in America decided to change the spelling, and hence the pronunciation of aluminium, is baffling, when all the other elements retain the "ium" ending. It is illogical.

But logic does not apply to language.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, June 18, 2015 - 11:48 pm:

And that is part of why I have always found linguistics to be so fascinating!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 19, 2015 - 07:56 am:

Old timers will remember that Omnibus on CBS TV, which introduced Alistair Cooke to American viewers in 1952, was partially sponsored by Aluminium Ltd. That's where I learned there are two versions of the word.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin Konrad on Friday, June 19, 2015 - 01:15 pm:

And then is it a 'soda', a 'pop', or a 'coke'???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Stewart -Calif. on Friday, June 19, 2015 - 02:11 pm:

g tala slensku. Dioes a telja? I mean I speak Icelandic. Does that count?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Friday, June 19, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

Allan, I find it interesting that Sir Humphry Davy, (a Brit) the guy that isolated aluminum called it "aluminum" - sort of like platinum (not platinium). :-)

(Message edited by tom_carnegie on June 19, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Friday, June 19, 2015 - 11:44 pm:

In Canada a Sofa is called a Chesterfield and a Hide-Away Bed is called a Castro Convertible

-Don


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