Ever trailer-ed a Coupe backwards?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Ever trailer-ed a Coupe backwards?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:22 am:

Guys I'm taking my Coupe for a run this weekend with the Dunedin Model T club and I will be towing it down and back. When I purchased it in Feb I towed it a lot further than this facing frontwards but I wondered if there is any risk of the back window popping out if faced the other way, the reason is to avoid the sun visor dragging in the wind. I realize I have to load the Coupe different to ensure weight is correct. Your thoughts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 08:01 am:

Kevin my only concern as you mentioned would be the weight distribution. I'd be afraid it would be "tail heavy" and really pull down the road squirrely, unless your trailer is long enough and you can get the engine/trans. right over the axles. You need close to 10% tongue weight. I've even discovered while hauling the car forward, if I had it back a foot "too far" the trailer felt funny. JMHO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 08:08 am:

Yes I've had experience with incorrect load and I think I can sort this its more the window issue that concerns me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 08:25 am:

I suppose a sedan would be the same as a coupe in that regard. I had no trouble at all. Of course, my speed limit was 55 mph because the Chebby is a gas hog. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 08:37 am:

That looks about right, I will only be doing about 50 mph myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 09:27 am:

On long trips I put both of my cars a26 coupe and a 24 Fordor on backwards it lets the air flow around better than the flat front and the visor could get bent back, I marked my trailer where the best place is to keep the weight OK, I don't think weight is a problem just distribution.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 10:07 am:

Unless your tow vehicle is an MG Midget or a Crosley, a Model T does not weigh enough to
worry about trailer weights and distro ... unless you load it really crazy !

I learned that lesson once, towing a 58 Caballero wagon with a 46 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup.
I got hip to that concept REAL QUICK !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 11:27 am:

As Tim Wrenn mentioned, you want at least 10% hitch weight. And if you error too much from the approx 10% hitch weight, be sure to error in the direction of more than 10% rather than less.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 11:29 am:

I wonder if it would have less drag going backwards?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 12:10 pm:

I have towed my coupe backwards over fairly short distances with no problem. My only concern was the weight at the front of the T lifting the nose of the trailer. Never thought about the rear window, but it is still there after 38 years....
As for less wind resistance, the car cover fits either way, both the front and rear windows are quite vertical, no difference for the wind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 12:14 pm:

Tim, I do not think that there is much difference in wind resistance backwards or forwards. It your trailer is a little longer than the T, You may have to move the T a little forward or backward to get the proper hitch weight. Not enough hitch weight can cause the tow vehicle and trailer to move around on the road. This can be dangerous.
If that back glass flies out towing backward, it was ready to fall out parked. (it is in there tight, not loose)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 02:22 pm:

I seem to remember seeing pictures of a fifties lakebed Ford, either a T or an A roadster (in body only) that some guy ran with the body on backwards. IIRC it was fast enough that its class had to have a rule added about body orientation.

That's what made me wonder how slippery a full bodied coupe was going backwards. I mean, the trunk has a lot smoother shape to push than the rad, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 03:38 pm:

You have nothing to lose by trying the Model T on the trailer backwards as long as it's balanced properly. When ever I put something different on one of my trailers I try the load out on a back road at about 40 mph. Once at speed I whip the steering wheel a few inches right, then left, while looking in the side mirror of my truck. If the rear of the trailer swerves to the side once and then immediately back to center its good. If it swerves twice it is back loaded too far. When I get everything where I need it to be I mark the side rail of that trailer so I know where to load next time. I have 6 different implements I use on this tractor and 6 different loading marks on the trailer. In this picture the cutter sticks out too far from the rear of the trailer but I only use it to mow at our country church and can get there on back roads with little to no traffic.

T4.75


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 04:45 pm:

Nice looking tractor!! It's good to have pictures!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:15 pm:

Bud, Yes but it's too bad so few things are made in the U.S.A. anymore. Even some of the John Deere line has Yanmar diesel engines!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Davis Houston TX. on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 05:39 pm:

Kevin, I always haul my 26 Coupe' backwards when using my open trailer. Reason, hauling forwards causes air to be forced into the cabin, bulging up the top to the point it looks as if the entire top would rip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 06:49 pm:

weight balance of a Model T is nearly 50/50 so I wouldn't worry about it throwing off the weight distribution on your trailer.

I corner-weighed my previous T on my racing scales and the front axle only had 20 more pounds on it than the rear... '25 Roaster with oak pickup bed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 07:15 pm:

True that,about so few things made in U.S.A., but having owned two different boats each with Yanmar's and now my Cub Cadet sub-compact tractor with a 24 H.P. Yanmar, I can see how they're taking over the small diesel engine market. Fantastic little engine. Although my last boat was a 4 cyl. "big block" 170 HP Yanmar. Very quiet running, stingy on fuel. This tractor can move mountains for its size.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, June 15, 2015 - 08:15 pm:

Great well backwards it is as long as the weight is correct. I have a system that works perfectly for me, my trailer is single axle and I have done thousands of miles hauling good loads with never an issue. I drop the safety chain on the road and count the links, drive the car on until the tow bar drops 1 1/2 to 2 inches (I use the chain links to measure this). I then tie down the car and adjust slightly if needed when winching down the car. Pull handbrake on when tied down.
Thanks for all your help guys.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration