Installing a Ball Bearing Fan Pulley

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Installing a Ball Bearing Fan Pulley
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 09:43 pm:

Hi guys, whether or not it's right for the car (my original pulley bushings are pooched) I have an aftermarket ball bearing pulley that needs to be installed. The instructions say to just 're-use the original bolt' but it looks like the original on my '26 wasn't your ordinary bolt. Should I be heading down to the hardware store for a long bolt to replace it or is there some way to get my original pulley bolt off for re-use?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 11:41 pm:

There should be two flats on the end that you would use to screw it out of the mount. This is what you should have;
https://www.modeltford.com/item/3966C.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 01:05 am:

I agree with Nark. Don't use a regular bolt. The fan shaft bolt is hollow for fan lubrication. Use the correct fan shaft bolt for your model car. If the new pulley is still loose with a correct new fan shaft bolt, you've got a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 07:42 am:

Tim

I've never used the aftermarket ball bearing pulley, but if its marketed as permanently lubricated, I can't see why a plain bolt wouldn't work provided its a good snug fit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 08:58 am:

Don't use plain bolt, use correct, original, hardened bolt. It will fit correctly and resist bending, and likely make for easier fan belt adjustments. Langs (and others) sell them, or you might find someone here offering up a gently used one that would work w/the sealed bearing.

respectfully, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 09:55 am:

Why use a ball bearing? The original bushings, and felt seal work just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:39 am:

A new sealed bearing and pulley works fine if you don't have a decent old one to re-use. So new pulley and care-free bearing, what's to not like:-)

But do use the proper fan shaft, a store bought 'bolt' is not the same, threaded shank will tear up the new pulley hole.

And with a '26-'27 style like this, the factory type fan shaft is needed, it has the special flat ends for securing the tightness of the pulley on the eccentric.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 01:57 pm:

The issue I'm having is a spacer or some such on the back side of the pulley which I guess does come off somehow so I can get that bolt out. Looks like I'll just have to douse it in some more penetrating oil.

The ball bearing pulley, BTW, is the one that I think is made by Texas T Parts. It was one of the first parts I bought before realizing just how extensive the list of available T parts really is. Hindsight being what it is I should have just bought a bushing kit and kept the original pulley but this thing is a driver so it doesn't bother me that it's not 100% as Henry made it. Improved parts for an improved car, right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 03:14 pm:

Tim

Guess your's is the Improved Fan.

To remove the fan shaft one must disassemble the entire assembly.

Remove the fan blades from the front of the pulley by taking out the 4 machine screws and lock washers.

That will get you access to the fan shaft. Then complete the disassembly. Lots of times the eccentric parts, plate, and hub need good brand of penetrating oil ( WD-40 won't do) to free up parts from rust.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

And these pics showing the disassemble.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 05:43 pm:

Larry, I don't agree with you. The original style throws grease all over the engine compartment. I bought a sealed unit from Lang's and it installed in about ten minutes (if that) and the mess is gone. It also spins more freely - giving a microscopic gain in horsepower. I love original, but I hate cleaning. I think that if the technology was there, Ford would have used a modern anti-friction system.
BTW: Today I replaced the screws that held my license plate on. I realized that they were Phillips head, and Phillips head were not used in the American auto industry until 1936. Slotted head screws are now installed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

My apologizes to Mark Gregush for misspelling your name. I meant 'I agree with Mark' (not Nark). I never did do well in typing class. I stand by my statement about using the correct part, which as stated above is a hardened bolt made especially for the application, regardless of whether the new pulley has sealed bearings or not, especially if authenticity means anything to you, but if you have it have one quick, or you are on a budget, buy the hardest bolt you can find that will fit, if there's such a thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 07:02 pm:

I found the same as John C and after cleaning grease/oil off for the 2nd time I decided. Hence I'm going through the same process and I purchased the correct bolt. The new bolt was too tight to snuggly fit in so I put it in the electric drill and held sand paper against it until it was correct, the two bearings spin correctly. You may have noticed that only one supplier gives you a spacer to put on the engine side of the pulley and the others don't, mine didn't so i made one up that only touches the inside bearing bottom face and avoids the spinning edge of the bearing. I assembled roughly and lined up the hub bearing exactly above the bottom engine pulley then cut my spacer to provide this location when done up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:30 pm:

I guess my dust cap is just REALLY on there. I'll let it soak in penetrating oil and go at it tomorrow or Tuesday. As of today, a short soak and a date with the hammer haven't been enough to break rust's bond, I'll just keep at it until I win. The original pulley itself turns (too) freely so the bushings aren't what's getting stuck here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:32 pm:

I'm also debating shooting a coat of black spray paint onto the new pulley to help keep it from standing out under the hood. Well, at least after I GET a hood...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:57 pm:

Tim:

Support the pulley on end with a pipe coupling or something similar that will allow the shaft head to pass thru the inside. Turn the castle nut over and run it back on the end of the shaft to protect the threads. Then tap the bolt out thru the front end of the fan pulley. That cap is light weight metal and it will likely deform and then break free from the shaft with a few light taps. The cap can be straightened or replaced with new.

respectfully, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 11:41 pm:

Thanks JB, that's been exactly what I've been doing. I may also tap around (nothing too hard) where the dust cap is in contact with the bolt to hopefully help free it. I think I should be able to get this thing apart tomorrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 12:06 am:

A point being missed is the original type of bolt is stepped. This is so that it can be wound up tight against the fan bracket, and then locked in place by the locknut, which, on the earlier arms is in turn locked with a split pin.

An ordinary bolt will not do. If the thread fits the arm, the shaft is way too small. If it is done up tight, it will put load on bearings which do not require it.

Unless your US fans are set up differently.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 12:51 am:

Terry;
I got a chuckle ot of it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 10:29 am:

I own a '25, which is almost the same set up as a '26. It doesn't throw grease, because they don't use grease! They use oil, and my car doesn't throw anything. Perhaps the fan and hub were assembled incorrectly. I put mine together exactly like the Ford book says to, with a new felt, and NOS bushings and shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 05:24 pm:

Success! I wonder how long you have to run a three bladed fan to do this to the bushing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 06:46 pm:

While your at this be sure to check your original 90+ year old fan blades for cracks. If it fails it can be ugly and expensive.
1
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 08:38 pm:

Larry, what Ford book is that? My Ford service manual says nothing about the fan, at least that I can see.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 11:09 pm:

Don't worry Ron, I have a brand new fan waiting in a box downstairs. The one that came on my T was missing a blade, which coupled with probably no maintenance tore apart the original pulley bushings hence my ball bearing replacement part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 12:06 am:

Stephen

The fan is mentioned in Lubrication section, Answer 99 of the Ford Manual. Also noted on the lube Chart.

Best results are heavy oil like 600W, rear axle 'grease'... won't run out as easy as engine oil.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 12:09 am:

I stand corrected! The Ford Service book only tells how to remove the fan assembly, and not how to overhaul it. I guess we'll have to revert to common sense! A good start would be to check out a parts book for the year of your car. It will tell you the number of pieces required for the fan assembly. The grub screw on the pulley is to put oil into, NOT GREASE. Besides a grease fitting will throw the fan out of balance. Oh, and don't forget the gasket. Gosh, and I thought the Ford Service book had everything. I must have at least a half dozen of them. I wonder how Ford forgot that operation?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 04:21 pm:

Larry, my fans are already rebuilt, new bushings, shafts, and felts. I fill mine with rear axle gear lube. I just thought I didn't see that part of the book.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 06:00 pm:

Ron - Thanks for the good safety tip,....and when you said "ugly and expensive", I have to agree,......a bloody broken off fan blade is an ugly thing for sure! And it is possible for a blade to break off while adjusting carburetor or something with the hood open! Something related to this thread came up recently,....making a habit of NOT standing in line with the fan while the engine is running!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 03:25 am:

And a fan thread isn't really complete without mentioning the possibility to run the car with the fan hanging on the garage wall - then you can be sure it won't sling oil or throw a blade :-)

It's not for all cars, all kinds of driving or all types of weather, but many T's will cool just fine without any fan - if you can avoid standing still for too long periods.

(Message edited by Roger K on June 24, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 11:54 am:

I don't think rear axle lubricant is thin enough to flow through the hole in the fan shaft. I use motor oil in mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee - Downeast Maine on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 12:29 pm:

600 weight seems a bit thick to me, so I use STP oil treatment which seems to fall somewhere in between motor oil and 600 - fill the fan once a year and never seems to do any leaking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 12:31 pm:

I use chain saw bar oil in my fan hub, same oil I use in the front spindles and tie rod ends. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 12:52 pm:

600W works fine, flow good in the 1/8" oil hole in the fan shaft. Bearings are bronze like rear axle thrusts.

What is worse is no lube, second worst is thick old grease that can cake in the oil hole.

I pre-oil the new felt on install. No leaks when fitted right. Only check on the oil each oil change (500 mi approx.) and added a trifle once in the last 3 years from rebuild.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 01:59 pm:

I was told by a chemist that STP treatment has NO lubricating qualities, it's just a viscosity enhancer.
Your results may vary!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 10:32 am:

Could someone measure from the face of the mounting cam to the centre of their fan pulley when they get the chance? I suspect the spacer that came with my kit is too long. My pulley appears to sit way farther away from the mount than what's shown above and the shaft only threads about half way into the nut on the backside of it all.


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