Learning Load Stability The Hard Way!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Learning Load Stability The Hard Way!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 09:54 pm:

Just a few more, I only wanna make one trip.

Howard DennisT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 10:08 pm:

Well what are we gonna do now Vern?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 10:35 pm:

Duck tape two sacks to the front fenders and yer good to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Saturday, June 20, 2015 - 11:06 pm:

It may need a fuel pump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Phillips on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 12:18 am:

reminds me of this


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 12:39 am:

Howard,

I love the first image ...

Arms crossed - looking everywhere else ...

Nope - wasn't me ... :-)


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 07:59 am:

Would definitely have fuel flow problems...... LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:41 am:

Hey bill now that we have the front end up you wanna repack those bearings?:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:53 am:

I wonder how long it took these Einsteins to realize that the solution to their self-created dilemma is to simply remove a few of the sacks? Removing them one at a time would not result in the front end dropping dramatically and damaging something on the car. Two trips to get all these sacks back to the farm is DEFINITELY the way to go!
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 11:16 am:

There was a photo circulating the net several years ago, showing a guy transporting 8' 2 x 4's on a motorcycle......side ways!

The Darwin club just gets bigger........:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 11:18 am:

Incidentally, anyone notice the front tires? They look like solids with holes around the perimeter. Early run flats?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 11:34 am:

And the idea of a clown car for parades was born.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 11:40 am:

The back tires are solid rubber, too. Reminds me of the old song, Don't worry about the Mule, just load the wagon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 02:21 pm:

Apparently, some of youseguys are unfamiliar with the operation of a
standard TT. Perhaps the boys doing the hauling did not have an extra
day to make a second trip ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, June 21, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

Well the truth be told the fellow at the front by the running board grabbed it and lifted the truck to unload it because they didn't have a dump bed. So they are unloading not loading the truck.

Is the glass half empty or half full?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 12:05 am:

Burger, that's not a TT. It is likely a Smith Form-a-truck conversion on a car chassis. I think they overdid it with the length of the tray. It might be ok hauling bags of chaff, but certainly not grain.
Did the Smith form-a-truck conversion come with solid tyres and those heavy wheels? The front wheels are also tubeless. Some one was serious about using that vehicle to haul loads.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 09:04 pm:

Being a few really tough days. Linda thanks you for the good laugh! Her first comment was "Donkey is thinking 'Those stupid humans'".

Thanks all!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 09:13 am:

Looks like it's a chain drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 09:55 am:

Would chaff plump those bags out like that,and why would anyone haul chaff?? Me think's grain bubba!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 09:57 am:

I saw something like this years ago. No Smart Phones to record it back then. A tree removal service had a large GM chassis & cab with a high home made winch on it. They lifted a large section of tree trunk and the driver was backing up to put it on a flat bed when he had to hit the brakes. The weight of the trunk caused the truck to pivot and up went the cab with the driver in it. The front wheels were about 5 feet off the ground and you never heard such hollering before. The capper was when the driver released the winch. The cab end crashed down and he hit the roof upon landing. We still talk about it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 08:38 pm:

Kenneth, if the chaff mill has a screw bagger, it certainly fills out the bags. But they still only weigh in around 80lbs as opposed to a smaller 3 bushel grain sack weighing in around double that. They do look like the larger chaff bags on the tipped up T. Their problem is a result of the extra long overhang on the tray, made that way perhaps so they could carry more lightweight bags of chaff. Now they know that was not a good idea.

I don't quite follow your query about hauling chaff. If you do not have your own chaffcutter, it need hauling from a mill somewhere. Farmers tended to have their own cutter. Townsfolk bought chaff for their horses, and they had to get it home somehow.

My bother-in -law owned a chaff and feed mill for many years. So did a mate who used to cut alfalfa chaff for racehorse owners and trainers. That had to be steamed as cut to reduce the dust.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

Allan,I know about dusty/moldy hay causing the [Heaves] in horses but chaff is off hay or straw?? Do your farmers mill hay and if so why?? Would it be the same as a feed grinder? People used to rake up dry bean pods to feed cattle but there was not anymore ??Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 06:24 am:

Kenneth, cereal chaff is usually cut from wheaten hay, there being special breeds of wheat with longer stems. The best quality is cut from sheaved hay, but this is getting harder and harder to find because of the high labour costs to cut and bind it, stook it in the paddock to dry, and then stack it for later use. Rougher quality can be made more cheaply by hammer milling baled hay.

My mate developed his steam cut alfalfa line to use small square bales of alfalfa. Each bale was hand loaded , pat at a time, and the 5 blade cutting wheel operated at varying speeds, depending on the hay and the feeding rate.From the cutter it was steamed and elevated to a twin screw bagger with inbuilt scales. Two men ran the whole line, one feeding, one taking the bags off and sewing them.

Even small square bales became hard to get because of the handling costs. He got around this by having the growers load them on double sized pallets to make it quick and easy to load with minimal labour costs.

Today, almost all chaff is produced by specialist chaff mills for the locally owned feed and fodder merchants. Their main customers are horse owners, racing stables and the like. We do use a little to mix with grain when feeding orphan lambs. it makes the grain go further and reduces the risk of scours when introducing the lambs to the ration.

Allan from down under


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