Re: Where to look for cars, what to look for, and how to get started

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Re: Where to look for cars, what to look for, and how to get started
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Keller on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 10:50 pm:

Hi all, I am just getting started in model t's and am now beginning to look for a car. I am aware of model t haven as well as the classifieds here. Anyone with any other links are appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, June 22, 2015 - 11:23 pm:

Maybe there's a local Model T or general old car club nearby where you can join, then look and listen for when local tour tested cars comes up for sale?
Your closest MTFCA chapter might be in Keymar, MD.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason, Whittier, CA on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 12:01 am:

James,
As soon as I joined one of the local club chapters and went to my first meeting other members were telling me about cars that were, or might be, available. I like the idea of getting a car from someone you are likely to see again, and other members know about as well. It seems a good way to help everyone be up front about what they know about the car and still be friends afterward. If there is a local chapter close enough I highly recommend you think about joining and get involved if you can. Model T people are just about the most friendly and helpful I have found.

Best regards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 12:30 am:

James

I did not join a club, and purchased my first car on e-bay. Later I did join both local clubs. Unfortunately the first tour I went on, my engine seized and ended in the shop.

I then proceeded to purchase another car from one of the members of one of the clubs. Definitely the way to go. Car runs great.

Buying on e-bay is 'Buyer Beware'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 01:39 am:

In addition to MTFCA and MTFCI magazines and websites, a big source of cars is Hemmings.
http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/?makeFacet=Ford&modelFacet=Model+T&adtypeFac et=carsforsale&year_min=&year_max=
Some are only "T buckets", some are wildly overpriced, and some are misrepresented, whether intentionally or not. But there are also usually some good cars at reasonable prices. Club or not, you definitely want an experienced Model t person with you when you check it out in person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 01:47 am:

Great to see a young man who loves Model T's........ :-O
Buying a car from anyone or anywhere is, pretty much, buyer beware......used car salesmen didn't get their reputations for nothing....... LOL .......although I bought my '19 Touring on ebay and got lucky for the most part.
The BEST, of course, is to find one that you can drive before you buy or have someone you trust at the other end check it out for you.
Being in HS I'm sure you don't have money to burn and I'd hate to see you get burned as much as you would....... :-(
I bet if you run across something that interests you and posted about it here someone would step up to help you out....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Keller on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 06:56 am:

Yeah, Im aware of the whole buyer beware thing and most scams around. Ive played with VW's for all my life, so the looking at it in person isn't really a new thing, as we've bought stuff sight unseen that ended up being trash. My uncle bought a $40,000 "restored" bus, and when he got it home, found bondo everywhere.
Hopefully, I can find something, but we'll see how everything works out.
Thanks for all the input, James


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 07:00 am:

Try Craigslist's local sites and some area sites. You might find some cars on there. Most on the people who don't belong to clubs post on there. Frequently I have found families who have inherited cars (and don't want them) post on Craigslist. If you don't know much about evaluating the mechanical condition of an antique vehicle or it originality, bring someone along who does. And don't bite on the first one you see unless it is exactly what you want at a price you can afford. Sometimes if you wait a little, better deals show up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jerry knouse on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 08:23 am:

An on line subscription to Hemmings is $12. This is a great deal as it allows you to see current ads. I purchased, and renew, at Hershey so price may be a show special.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Sweere on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:37 pm:

I just went through what you did.

My plan of attack:

1. Geek out on reading books, forums, mtfca manuals, etc.
2. Take Gilmore Museum's Model T driving course. One of the instructors recommended I start with the best 26-27 I could afford. (And so I did.)
3. Join a few T clubs, find your local support network.
4. Ask the forum - see http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/542606.html?1432072155 for all the great advice I got.
5. I bought my car on ebay, only to discover later it couldn't drive for more than 10 minutes. Start watching ones over a few weeks and also use ebay's Advanced Search "Sold listings" feature to see past sales to see the pattern of prices for your preferred ride.
6. I have begun pouring a decade of time, sweat, and $$ into my paid-too-much?, great-looking, not-drivable-yet hole. Ahh, what else is a mid-life crisis car for? (Other than pickin' up chicks.)

Another option is to visit a large, regional car show with many T's and start asking around. You'll learn something and maybe even leave your card with someone who'll see you hers.

I sorta wish I took Kevin's advice -- don't buy the first, best T you come across. These are 100-year-old cars... there will be a better, closer one for sale in a few months.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:51 pm:

Google Model T Fords for sale and you'll get a number of sites. Most have been mentioned. Old Rides.com is another one. Old Car online.com and Antique car.com are 2 others. Hemmings is daunting with very high prices. I bought a T on Craigslist years back. Just be sure to actually look at the car you're interested in and make sure it has a title. And don't jump at the first one you see. Especially if it's not exactly what you want. There's plenty of them out there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 12:59 am:

I agree with Charlie on many of the Hemmings ads. But among the many overpriced vehicles listed there you'll also find a few occasional bargains. As the other guys have said, take your time, check out the candidates thoroughly before voting with your dough, and find The One You Really Want.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 04:08 am:

One of my first pieces of advice is usually to figure out what it is you want, and what do you want from it?
Antique automobiles is a HUGE hobby, with many different areas of interest and activities. One of the best ways to do this, is as others have said, local clubs or hobbyists. Look, ASK questions. Get rides if you can, get a feel for what the cars are like to be driven.
There are show cars, tour cars, drivers, historic preservation, all are different and the needs of the cars are different. Ask about these things. Horseless Carriages are generally 1915 and earlier. The rules vary from club to club, and some are very strict. Many cars supposedly from the Brass Era (Horseless Carriage) are not correct enough and may or may not be welcome in some clubs and activities. Ask about those differences and look closely at a car if you are thinking of buying it.
Speedsters are another area where rules and desirability varies a lot. I like speedsters (have restored six of them over the years), and they are a lot of fun. I personally (this is me, for me, my way) prefer to keep and restore speedsters as close to "era correct" as I can. A lot of other people are much more loose about that and also build beautiful cars that they have a lot of fun with.

Good luck! Antique automobiles have an almost magical way of connecting their keepers to history in a way that helps them to develop an understanding of their own place in the universe. No car does it better than a model T Ford.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 10:42 am:

James,
Click on my name, above (underlined in blue) and send me a private message with your e-mail address so I can send you a copy of my humble effort at a first-time Model T buyer's guide. _I'd post it here, but it contains too many photos. _I will not share your e-mail address with anybody.


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