Early fan pulley adjustment

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Early fan pulley adjustment
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

How do you tighten the bronze fan pulley on the shaft? The bronze pulley on my '14 has a bit of movement and is making a rather annoying noise. I've tried tightening the belt, and I've tried loosening the belt and it doesn't make too much difference. Is it just pressed on?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 08:52 pm:

There are two bronze bushings in the hub, one on each side. Likely one or both are worn. I'm not sure if the vendors sell these early ones; if they don't, you'll have to machine some new bronze bushings and press them into place. Then ream them to fit the shaft. Not a bad job but if you don't feel like tackling it, take it to a local machine shop. Just be sure not to use brass; it's too soft. Use naval bronze, which is very close to the old Ford Z bronze.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 09:16 pm:

I don't believe the brass fan hubs used bushings, only the steel ones. As far as tightening, just screw in the shaft toward the fan bracket a tad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 10:17 pm:

Larry, do you use a special wrench on the shaft head on the front of the blades? I did notice that there are two flat areas that look like it would work for a wrench, but it's awfully shallow - I tried using vice grips but it's just too darn shallow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 11:08 pm:

The grease cap at the other end is a lock nut, loosen the whole thing and then the shaft will screw in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 11:10 pm:

Bill, the shaft is stepped so it can be wound into the arm against the step. It is then locked in place with the nut on the back. There is no adjustment for endplay. I use as small a crescent wrench as will fit the shaft. The handle of the wrench is parallel with the shaft, the jaws engaging on the flats on the shaft. If you want to get it really tight, you can use another crescent wrench across the handle of the first one.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 12:11 am:

Your car has a grease cup on the rear of the shaft. I would loosen it before trying to tighten the shaft. To me, it would be a lot easier to remove the entire fan bracket with the fan on it, and service it on the bench, and then re-install it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 12:25 am:

Bill, Larry is right. It is much easier to set the fan up off the car. My method won't work unless it is off the car. On the earlier cars the greaser is the locknut. Being pressed metal, these are not as robust as an ordinary castellated nut, and will not take the same torque.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 09:25 am:

The fan hub on my '14 is brass and there were no bushings in it. I did mine as RV suggests above and it turns true without vibration after 5,000+ miles. Very easy to keep greased as well.

"Noise and movement" suggests the hub is wallowed out. Only one bolt attaches the fan assembly to the block. While off, check the fan blades very carefully for cracks. A broken fan blade will play havoc with the back side of your radiator.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 10:33 am:

The drawing shows the bushings. Also I just checked the spare fan I have on hand; there are two bushings, one on each end. The rearmost one has a large flange, like a miniature version of the early transmission brake drum bushing. The front bushing is smaller.

I think if the hub is cleaned and examined closely you will see the "parting line" around the bushing flanges.

It's possible that Ford didn't call them bushings (I don't remember) but the brass fan hub is shown in the drawings to be a three-piece assembly. The bushings have their own part numbers. It's possible that the fans were made by Ford and also by an "outside" maker, like many parts were, who used a different design. Again, I don't remember for sure, but I will check it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 01:18 pm:

I took the fan assembly off and tried to tighten the shaft but no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get the slop out. So I took it apart and here is what I found. I looks like there is one bushing in the rear of the hub, but I don't see a bushing outline on the front of the hub. And there's a groove that goes on the inside of the hub as well. If these are the bushings, how do your remove them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 01:34 pm:

You could remove the bushings by threading in a tap, such as is done with the spindle body bushings, and removing the rear bushing that way. Then you will have more clearance to press out the front bushing in the usual manner.

The front bushing is different from the rear; it doesn't have the big flange. The bushing's edge is obscured by the fan blades but you can still press it out. Just be careful to support the assembly as close to the bushings as you can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 06:48 pm:

R.V., I now see where the flange edge is for the bushings, and I also notice that the rear bushing is quite worn at the center, which is why I have a noticeable back and forth movement. The current bushings have grooves in them; if I decide to make some, do I need to replicate the grooves?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 08:41 pm:

Bill, there is no need to make new bushing, Langs has them.
https://www.modeltford.com/item/3974-4A.aspx

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 08:45 pm:

Latest update; the rear "bushing" is not pressed in. I tried the tap and remove method but only succeeded in bending the tool and hub. It sure looks like there's lead around the outside of the rear "bushing" area, so I'm not sure if someone did a repair job at one point. Now I've got threads inside the center of the rear hub and not sure how to proceed. I see the vendors sell a complete brass hub with blades attached and a sealed bearing, but it's not cheap!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 10:03 pm:

Bill, you may find the rear bushing is soft SOLDered in. I little heat bay liberate it. I have found two hubs with bushes that were either SOLDered in as new or were repaired by SOLDering the bush back in.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 06:44 am:

Allan, that sounds like a good idea - I'll try heating it today; can't hurt!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 10:32 am:

The drawing may specify soldering; at least one of the hubs I have also has a thin silver line around the rear bushing flange.

I will go back and study the drawing again.

Lang's bushings look like the right ones, and they might be, but the description states that they are for the later fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, July 02, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

OK; I checked the drawing. There is a separate flanged bushing at the rear of the hub. Ford called for it to be soldered in place. There is no front bushing; the hub itself is line reamed with the rear bushing. At first glance it looked as though there were a front bushing but the part number placed there was the number of the hub casting. So the completed hub is an assembly of just two parts, the hub and the soldered-in-place rear bushing.

To repair a hub you could either make a new rear bushing and then bore out the front to accept a new bushing, or bore out both front and rear and make new bushings for both.

Or just get a better hub.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, July 02, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

You also need to check the belt area of the hub, as the brass ones tend to loose the "crown" that keeps the belt centered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Thursday, July 02, 2015 - 01:54 pm:

We also sell the new brass bushings, Bob


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