Waterbag

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Waterbag
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 11:56 pm:

I rediscovered this while looking for other stuff.I bought it in Spokane in 2010.The little paper swing tag shows a price of 1.55! It is still brand new.

What can you tell me about its age, value etc. I feel it is too good to use. I have a Desert Cooler bag I can use.


Allan from dowm under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 06:21 am:

Can't tell you too much about that particular bag but I have experience with those from the '40's and 50's. Traveling from PA to WY my dad always had one hooked over one of the bumperettes on the front of our '46 and then '50 and '53 Chevy's. He was death on soda so all my brother and I got was water. Mom too. It was cool, as I remember. I never could figure that out and dad kept trying. My brother, 4 years older, could understand the evaporation process. I still have the bag made by EAGLE. Not as good shape as yours.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 06:34 am:

Those are still sold new, at least similar ones with similar lettering. I think they go about $15 for new ones at flea markets.

Old interesting ones sometimes sell for $20 on eBay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RARE-Antique-1910s-Radiator-Water-Cooling-Bag-Auto-Caspe r-Wyoming-Sign-Car-VTG-/321791205123?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4aec401f03


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 11:02 am:

Hirsch Weis was the parent company of White Stag, that's their logo between the words at the top.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Stag_%28clothing%29


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 11:28 am:

How do they work and why do you always see them slung over the front of a radiator?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 11:32 am:

You soak the outside of the bag, then the bag and the water inside cools by evaporation of the outside water (like sweating cools your body).

Folks mounted them in front of the radiator so that the wet bag would get a good breeze over it at all times.

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 08:30 pm:

Although the bag did restrict the airflow somewhat, the dampness from the sweating bag improved the radiators efficiency, actually helping cool the car on hot days.

We had those around my grandfather's ranch when I was little in the mid '50s to early '60s. In the 1960s they fell out of favor for sanitation and health reasons with the farm worker movement at that time. Most of those you can find today are left from that era. They do go back over a hundred years and changed very little over time. Researchable logos are probably the best way to narrow down their specific age.

I have two of them that came from my grandfather's place.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, June 26, 2015 - 09:17 pm:

And drinking the water from them tastes BL**DY terrible!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 09:47 am:

The farm worker safety issue brought back memories. On our railway station platforms they used to hang a round waterbag of about 10 gals capacity. It had a canvas tube up the side with a wire hook on it so the tube could be held up. When you wanted a drink, you grabbed the string attached enamelled pannikin, lowered the tube to fill up, and then hanged the tube up again. Can you imagine that today????

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 10:07 am:

If anyone can tell me where to purchase a NEW jute version of the old water bags, please do! They may have fallen out of favor but I still remember how ice cold they kept water. Love to have one to sling on my mirror mount!

I found one at a flea market that appeared unused, but never did seal when I filled it even after hours of soaking. Evidently the fibers loose their ability to hold water with age.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 10:38 am:

They are not made from Jute. They are made from raw combed linen fiber.

The bags are constantly on ebay and at flea markets anywhere and everywhere. Garage sales, swap meets, Goodwill stores. If you want one it should take minutes to click buy it now. They sell typically for under $20 for brand new unstained ones in perfect condition. As mentioned, the water tastes awful.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, June 27, 2015 - 05:18 pm:

I was stationed at what was to become NAS Sigonella, Sicily. A small group of us were sent ahead to help set up the electronics shop and service any visiting aircraft that might need avionic assistance. The air field was still in a rustic condition with only an empty hanger and the runways. There was a local kid that came around on a three wheeled scooter with a box on the back that held local soft drinks, melons, fruit and water in clay jugs. The jugs were porous and seeped a small bit of water that evaporated and cooled the water. The water had a slight clay taste to it but the cool water was welcome.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 08:58 pm:

The best (supposedly) water bags were made with scotch flax. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 12:33 am:

Yes, I meant flax in my previous post.....and maybe it's just childhood nostalgia, but I don't recall the water tasting "awful". But of course, if you're a thirsty kid on a hot day I guess anything tasted pretty good!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 01:59 am:

I remember the water tasting very good. But what did I know when I was less than 10?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 02:41 am:

Maybe the taste depends on for how long the water has been in the bag..? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph W. Rudzik on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 08:59 am:

Or how hot, dry, dusty and desperate you are.

Joe R.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 09:25 am:

Or whether it's made from Scotch flax. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 11:46 am:

Or how much oil and gas has soaked in the fabric from being tossed around the shop! KGB


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration