Twisted Wooden Wheel Hub

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Twisted Wooden Wheel Hub
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rod Barrett - Anderson, IN on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 09:19 am:

Does anyone have any experience with this?



I noticed this while cleaning the car for a show. All of the other wheels do not show any signs of wear except for the right rear. I jacked up the rear end and I cannot feel any play in the wheel, but it concerns me that the spokes appear to have twisted on the hub. Any recommendations on who can repair or replace this wheel? Thanks, Rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 09:32 am:

Send it to Steve Johnson. Johnsons wood wheels Ardmore Ok. To save in labor and shipping break the wheel down and blast the hub and rim. He will build a new wheel and primmer your parts and true the wheel as well. Wouldnt hurt to do both rears and then fronts when time permits, if you like to tour, you may want sound wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 11:04 am:

You might not feel any side play in the spokes, but this appears to be end play. You don't say what year this car is, but if it has wood felloes, you definately need to have it rebuilt. If it has steel felloes, sometimes it can be shimmed up and last a little longer, but what happens with end play, is that the spokes move up and down as the wheel turns and the movement will wear the wood away and then later you will get the side play and eventually the wheel will collapse. You must have found this very soon after it began to happen.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Evan in Paso Robles on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 11:32 am:

Hello Rod,

I think that I would first pull the wheel off of the axle and check to see that the hub bolts are tight.

Evan in Paso


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 11:49 am:

That wheel looks rotten. The wood needs to be replaced.

You are about 4 hours driving time from Stutzmann's wheel shop in Berlin, Ohio. They charge about $175 to re - wood a round fellow wheel like yours. Takes about a month. They use hickory grown in their own forest, felled by them, sawn by them, and cured in Stutzmann's barns. It is a very interesting place to visit, worth the drive.

Stutzmann Wheel Shop 330-897-1391

(Message edited by royce on June 28, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 11:50 am:

Take the wheel off the car and remove the hub.

If the holes between the spokes are still round and tight around the hub bolts, reinstall and align the hub and bolts and tighten accordingly.

If the holes are egged out, drill new holes between the spokes (where holes currently do not exist) and reinstall the hub. Install the bolts in these new holes.

Check the rest of the wheel for tightness and soundness of wood before deciding whether or not to shim the felloe or have the wheel rebuilt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 02:13 pm:

This indicates that the ends of the spokes within the hub have compressed, allowing the wheel to "clock". This is a sign of some wood failure, and for safety's sake requires a careful examination of the spokes. I suspect your only long-term and safest solution is new wood. If all four wheels are original to the car, I would be suspect of the others too.
Shame, looks like you have a nice paint job on the wheels, but it also appears to be pretty thick--it could be hiding a multitude of wood sins.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 02:56 pm:

For very good reasons, having run vintage racing cars on 1/2 mile dirt track at full racing speeds, I have more faith and trust in wood wheels than most model T people. I like them. I have tightened them, and run them hard.
What I see in your photo scares me.
Better to fix it right.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Sunday, June 28, 2015 - 05:52 pm:

Rod,
I have repaired a natural finished rear wheel on a 15 touring that spun worse than what your picture would indicate. The other wheels were tight and only one wheel had the hub spin some. That was over 10 years ago and the wheel and spokes are still tight.
If your wood is rotten....have them all rebuilt as others have suggested. If the wood is good and only loose in the one hub....then I would use epoxy structural adhesive.
Assuming only this wheel is loose, remove the wheel and only the hub bolt nuts. Then slide the wheel/hub back on the axle and rotate the wheel so the spokes are aligned then remove the wheel assy. Next, mark the location of the hub and spokes and remove the hub leaving the spokes as they would normally be located.
Carefully examine the spokes for rot. If the wood is good, then purchase Marine Tex structural adhesive that is available from boat repair stores....like West Marine. When mixed, it is much thicker compared to JB Weld.
Clean the hub and adjoining spokes to be repaired with lacquer thinner and allow to dry. The Marine Tex normally has a pot life of 1 hr. in a cool temperature. I work the mixed epoxy between each spoke and coat all areas that will be in contact with the hub. Slide the hub/brake drum back in place and secure the bolts/nuts. Clean all excess epoxy using lacquer thinner.
Make sure no epoxy is remaining inside the hub taper where the axle goes. Place the wheel back on the axle and rotate wheel checking for excess run out. Run out can be corrected before the epoxy has cured by pulling the wheel with a tie down strap against the opposite wheel. Allow the epoxy to cure over night.
Over the years, I have tightened several sets of wood wheels using this method. In dry areas, wood wheels tends to shrink and become loose. If the wood is good, then I would first consider repairing them. Another method is shrinking a metal band around the wood fellow.
I like the epoxy method as it fills all the voids and bonds the spokes and hub together.


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