1914 Pumpkin Housing

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1914 Pumpkin Housing
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 08:31 am:

Is the rear axle housing (original pumpkin style) on my 1914 Touring supposed to get pretty warm after a short tour? A friend of mine came over and we took my T for a trial spin. When we got back, he felt the brass hubs to see if they were warm or hot (they weren't) and then he felt the pumpkin housing, which was fairly warm. He said it shouldn't be warm and was a little concerned. I rebuilt the entire rear end, and was pretty thorough and had others with more experience take a look at the finished repairs before buttoning it all back up so I don't see why it would be getting hot. I'm running Lubriplate in the axle, and I know I have enough in it. Could the heat be from the exhaust?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 09:15 am:

When you say Lubriplate to me I think of the white grease we used to use on ignition point lobes & some other stuff. Basically a light grease. Is that what you're using? I doubt it but had to ask.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 10:35 am:

No, Lubraplate is 140W gear lube sold by Langs and used in all the Model T's that run at Greenfield Village. It was recommended to me by the mechanics at the Village. I'm going to let my T run in the driveway for a good while to see if the exhaust is making the housing hot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 10:53 am:

OK. Yeah. I'd look into the exhaust too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 11:15 am:

Bill... THe 12-rivet rear in my 15 and my 13 both get warm. Both have been rebuilt and the 15 has many thousands of miles on it. There's a lot of friction in there with all those gears meshing and just the gears spinning through the oil will generate a little heat. The exhaust also is dumping on the differential housing so that adds to it. So no, they are not supposed to be "cold" or cool in my experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 12:57 pm:

James, I'm thinking it's normal as well. I'd never checked it before in my '16 and wouldn't have even thought of it until my friend mentioned it. I really can't do a comparison test with it at idle in my driveway, since driving conditions require much more throttle than would be at idle, and I don't want to have her running at high throttle while in a parked situation for too long. I don't doubt my rebuild and I can't see where I would have done something so drastic that it would cause binding, which to me would cause a heated housing. Therefore, I'm gonna assume it's normal to have a warm axle housing after a few miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, June 29, 2015 - 01:33 pm:

They do get pretty warm Bill. The bronze thrust washers are not frictionless and do generate some heat. A general rule of thumb is if you can hold your hand on an object for no longer than 5 seconds, it's about 135F. (or you could use a fancy laser thermometer) If it's about 135F I'd say that's about normal after a nice drive.


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