Generator ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Generator ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 08:06 am:

Yesterday with my youngest son driving, I notice
my ammeter pegged like 20 amps. So I turn
headlites on no difference. Yep my left headlight
bulb blew. The gen does have a modern reg or
cut out. My question is that, the day before
all was good. Whats this, night time gremlems?
So before I pick up the phone; did this new
style cut out take a dump? Next question it is
said running the gen not hooked up will cook em?
why? I had vehicles that regulators went bad
and did not hurt the generator. I'll also say
I'm not an electrical dummy But this new stuff
with sealed pc boards- a dummy I am. So I think
I'll try a old cut out. If I get same results
then something went south in the generator while I was sleeping. Car history; not spent
a dime on it, no fixing, uses no oil no leaks
one turn starts even the coldest days. Used
mainly as a parts chaser like napa etc.because
it runs on air. F350 4 miles a gal. LOL
So guys point me. Also back of my mind says
20 amps should not blow bulbs out, voltage does. so I'll stick my volt meter on it.
sam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 08:10 am:

You may have a bad battery. An old style cutout is very unreliable compared to one of John Regan's Fun Projects voltage regulators.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 09:04 am:

The second part of your question (why will it cook it self) is this. With the load removed from the generator, it dumps its entire output to the field which increases the output to the point solder will melt and ruin the armature.

Think of it as the electrical equivalent of a dog chasing its tail. Only difference is, one is funny and the other is expensive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - 10:56 am:

Take some time and review your generator's third brush. With lights off, engine running, battery installed, and some one to watch the amp gauge carefully adjust the brush to a sensible reading. If this does not work you may be other problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Wednesday, July 01, 2015 - 03:38 am:

This is interesting ? I get 6.5 vts from the
wire on the generator-engine off. Engine
running I get 1.41vts from the same wire??????
I was expecting high 6vt or 7vts.
got to think about that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, July 01, 2015 - 07:20 am:

If you're getting voltage on the generator side of the cutout with the engine off, the points in the cutout are burned closed. This will result in a dead/near dead battery overnight. And a very warm generator.

If your readings are on the battery side of the cutout, I agree with Royce. You may have a bad battery. Remove the battery and have it load tested. You can't judge a lead-acid battery simply by the voltage. I have a pile of UPS batteries that all show 12+V and can't light an 1157 bulb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, July 01, 2015 - 07:43 am:

If this is a diode style cutout it can fail shorted or open.

The version you want is here:
http://www.funprojects.com/products/5055r.aspx

Without sacrifice of the original look you can now replace that troublesome generator cutout. Enjoy the luxury of modern day electronics mounted in original style, generator cutout housing. Cruise with confidence knowing you have true field winding control (not just a diode) and protection from electrical system burn out which includes the battery and generator. Designed for the standard 6 volt negative ground system, 8 and 12 volt models are also available.

•No lost "Show" points - exact replacement for generator cut out
•Not just a diode but a complete electronic voltage regulator
•Protects the generator and electrical system from burn out
•No alterations to generator or car wiring - installs in minutes
•No more dead generator or boiled away battery
•Externally perfect in appearance - would have fooled Henry
•Available with or without authentic Ford script


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Thursday, July 02, 2015 - 02:51 am:

Thanks guys, the batt is new a commercial no
issues with that the cut out is the modern
type no points. Generator runs cool, no dead
batt. over nite. Only thing is, it put out
10 amps since I machined the engine 2 yrs ago.
Then one day last week I think its putting out
to much. Maybe I need glasses. And then my
50 Ford tractor charges 15-20 amps all day.
And for Ken, my volt readings taken on the
batt. side. My confusion is with engine running
shows 15 amps inside but I get 1.41 volts from
the same wire huh? should be around 7vts right.
sam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Thursday, July 02, 2015 - 01:05 pm:

What kind of meter are you using? Digital or analogue?

"Next question it is said running the gen not hooked up will cook em? why? I had vehicles that regulators went bad and did not hurt the generator."

If a voltage regulator fails there is no output to the field windings, so no harm is done to the generator.
A Model T generator is a different animal and Gary Tillstrom's answer is right on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, July 03, 2015 - 11:38 am:

There are a couple of other things than a bad battery which could cause this problem. I loose connection between the generator and the battery. If you have a starter and it still works, the loose connection would be between the generator and the starter switch yellow wire. This could be at the starter switch, the terminal block or behind the switch. Your ammeter seems to still be connected as are the lights, so that would narrow it to the wire between the switch , the terminal block, and the starter switch. Could be a bad crimp or solder joint at the wire end. If you have a starter and it doesn't work, you could have dirty battery terminals and cable terminals. This is very common, because the acid corrodes the lead and caused a white powdery film to form. Clean these up good and try again. If it starts and the ammeter reading is normal, you have fixed the problem. I leave the most expensive possible cause for last. A bad battery.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Saturday, July 04, 2015 - 08:50 am:

The 1.41 Volt reading is most likely from using a digital meter to take voltage readings with the engine running. The ignition noise radiating from the coil/timer ignition makes even the best digital meter give nonsense readings. Whether the digital meter be a Harbor Freight $5 item or one like my megabucks Fluke laboratory grade unit - the result is the same when the engine is running - nonsense readings.


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