Are these 1916 hose clamps?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Are these 1916 hose clamps?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, July 09, 2015 - 08:27 pm:

Does anyone know if these clamps are original to our 16? I see the top clamps don't match the bottom 4 look alike top


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:14 am:

They made those type hose clamps up until recently. They were made by Ideal. Why they quit making them is beyond me. Thankfully, Snyders is making them again, but they are expensive, being about $26.00 for a set. He and Langs also sell some that they claim are just like Henry made them, but THEY ARE NOT, and much cheaper too. If you don't have that kind of money to spend on hose clamps, clean those up and reuse them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:16 am:

Sounds like a "yes" answer to me. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:19 am:

In my experience, you cannot get the "correct" hose clamps to clamp tight enough before the flimsy material they are made of deforms.

After dealing with leaks at the the upper and lower radiator connection for years, I finally changed them out with traditional worm gear hose clamps found at the hardware store for a fraction of the price.

No more leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:26 am:

If I get a leak from the flimsy hose clamps, I put a worm clamp on in its place. After a few days, you can usually take the worm clamp off and replace it with a flimsy clamp and it won't leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:48 am:

If you use worm style hose clamps be sure that you do NOT get all stainless steel. The all stainless are intended for corrosion prone places such as being buried on a soil pipe connection. Stainless screw to stainless band are not for uses subject to vibration, ring a bell here? Plated steel screw to stainless band will be OK.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 01:14 pm:

Layden - A bit "OT" here, but perhaps of some interest, especially to non-purists:

Stainless steel hose clamps have their place, but there is an interesting thing about stainless steel hose clamps. Some of them are not "ALL" stainless, as the screw that tightens the clamp on some "automotive" type stainless steel hose clamps is NOT stainless steel and will rust. One sure way to obtain "ALL" stainless hose clamps (including the screw) is to purchase stainless steel hose clamps form a reputable marine supply dealer. I learned this the hard way due to failure of an "automotive" type stainless steel hose clamp that failed due to the tightening screw rusting on a diesel engine in a boat in salt water.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 02:40 pm:


I like to stay pretty close to original, but I do use fillister head screws in the clamps so the screwdriver can get a better grip. I got tired of round heads slipping.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 03:25 pm:

I've always installed automotive hoses with a little smear of silicone sealant on the inside. I don't see any leakage regardless of what type of clamp.

Paul, if you need more original clamps I might have some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 03:29 pm:

Royce, I've always done the same, especially if the neck that the hose fits on has any pitting. I clamp it up and let the assembly cure overnight before I pour the coolant back in. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 04:01 pm:

John Reagan posted an idea some years ago that works great.

Put these on the hose, but loose and towards the center.

Put worm-style on the outside of these.

Install the hose, and tighten with the worm drive. Run the car to get it worm and set the worms tight for a good seal.

Let everything cool, remove the worms and slide the original into place, and tighten them.

I've one this a number of times and it works great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 04:37 pm:

I think the biggest problem with the repro clamps is not the clamps themselves but the reproduction red hoses are substantially harder compared to older and original hoses. The older hoses were softer and sealed better so subsequently the clamps didn't have to be as tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 05:38 pm:

I see what you guys mean about the original type clamps I put the old ones on top hose one leaked no mater what I tried so I put a worm drive back on when I get a bottom pipe I will try again maybe sealer will help thanks guys


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 06:00 pm:

Guys... In my experience, the problem usually isn't the clamp.. or the red hose. It's because after a hundred years, the Cast iron mating surfaces are no longer smooth. They're severely pitted. An easy fix is to smear RTV around the pitted surface, slide the hose on and clamp her down with the nice looking original clamps. Let it set over night and you're in business!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 06:34 pm:

I stretch a piece of 1" bicycle tire tube over each hard connecting point for all the hoses - upper tank, inlet, outlet, pipe, lower tank. Forms a soft surface for the hose to clamp to. No leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 08:09 pm:

Royce, interesting to hear of your use of silicone to seal the hoses. I found with original type clamps, the silicone acted as a lubricant and allowed the hose to distort into a small hill at the clamp join, resulting in an even worse leak. I use good ole Aviation Permatex gasket cement. Probably not the correct application, but it works.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 08:19 pm:

Original hoses were black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 08:33 pm:

Lots of good info this is what I took off top hose was red bottom black


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 06:17 am:

Maybe they were all the same color from the beginning but got discolored by age?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 11:03 am:

one problem you will have with modern stainless worm gear clams is the sharp edge of the clamp cutting into the hose when tightened.

The hose material today does not hold up well with the clamp being tightened. That is why new car manufacturers have gone to spring, and wire band type hose clamps.

just saying,

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

The answer to your question is they were used on just about every kind of car up into the '50s. Why Ideal discontinued them is beyond me.


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