Rear Hub Worn at Keyway

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Rear Hub Worn at Keyway
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By markc on Thursday, July 09, 2015 - 09:23 pm:

Hi All,

The Hub for my 21' wood spoke is worn at the key way. can I remove and replace without having to repress the spokes. Was hoping to change the front plate put the bolts in then remove the back one and hopefully all will stay in alignment. Can I use the old spokes or do I have to replace them.
Thanks Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, July 09, 2015 - 11:20 pm:

Mark,

You can replace the hub only without having to disassemble the spokes. Remove the 6 bolts & the front plate. Place blocks of wood against the spokes and as close to the back flange as you can get. With a big hammer or press, push the hub out of the spokes. Don't worry if a few spokes shift a bit, they'll go back in place later. The important thing though is to support the spokes while you drive the hub out. Ideally, it would be great to have a ring that goes around the hub flange and against all the spokes evenly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 03:26 am:

In my limited experience it isn't easy to shift hubs. But I haven't got any press - that's a minimum requirement.

In some cases it's possible to make a step key that fits both the std width in the axle and the widened key slot in a worn hub. It depends on the shape of the widened key slot - if it's very distorted it'll be hard to make a key that fits.
Worn hubs can be shimmed and if the 0.010" thick shim the vendors sells isn't enough, it's easy to make your own shim out of thicker steel. Double shims should be avoided if possible. Might be hard to find just the right thickness among stuff you have at home though, when I rummaged my garage for old tin cans all of them had the same 0.010" thickness..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 07:15 am:

Mark, you have two problems getting a hub out of a wheel. First the outer plate has to be removed. It is essential that the part of the hub on the outside of the plate gas to be scraped clean of all paint and rust. Then, with the 6 bolts removed, the plate should be driven part way around the hub so the bolt holes no longer line up. A drift can then be used through the back of the hub to drive the plate off the other side.

A press is best to push the hub out once the outer plate is off. The spokes must be supported as close to the bub as possible. If the wheel is allowed to dish, the spokes will dig in around the hub and it will be almost impossible to push the hub out.

Going back in is a piece of cake compared to removal. You will find the ends of the spokes chamfered on the inside end, and this makes it much easier to press in the new hub.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

It would seem to me that the brake drum would be a good support for the ends of the spokes when you remove the hub. Isn't it located between the hub and the spokes?
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 01:10 pm:

No, it's on the inside of the hub, held by the hub bolts. It has to be removed before any attempt to press out the hub.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

Norman, if the drum is turned over, it could be used as a support for the spokes under the press. However, it is not a good idea for two reasons. One, the drums are thin and the edge will did into the wooden spokes. Two, the support offered is getting further away from the hub flange than is optimal. I use a piece of laminated plywood beam with a hole sawn in the middle, just big enough to clear the flange on the hub. Soft on the timber spokes and as close as you can get to the hub.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 09:47 pm:

That post was in error! After I wrote it, I looked at pictures of the wheels and found that the drum was inside the hub, however I must have hit post instead of cancel!

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Friday, July 10, 2015 - 10:15 pm:

You don't actually need a press if you loosen the spokes with a wooden mallet one at a time. First you tap the spokes that have the large taper near the hub outward and tap the ones with the smaller taper after wards, slowly walking the spokes off the hub. Replace the spokes the same way. And yes you can re-use the spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 12:05 am:

Kep, what you describe will work on Canadian sourced wheels like we down under have. US wheels do not have the double taper on the base of the spokes to allow the proceedure you describe.

Allan from down under.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration