Wheel Painting Day

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Wheel Painting Day
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 12:42 am:

First off, THANK YOU Mike Walker and Mike Bender for supplying the axle stubs and front spindles!!

The wheels arrived from Stutzman's last Wednesday so it was time to get to it. The stand breaks down easily with 2 bolts. There is a cross brace for the front wheels with spindle stubs, and a brace for the rear wheels with axle stubs. I was able to paint all 4 wheels at one time; lay a coat on one wheel, rotate all of them, then lay a coat on another. After I finished spraying I continued to rotate them every few minutes for about 1/2 hour, then every 10 minutes or so for another hour. Worked great!

Rear wheels

Stub Hub

Cross Brace


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 01:51 am:

Oh, that looks so-o nice! I love freshly painted wheels!!! (Sorry to those that prefer natural finish.)
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 08:30 am:

Gary, what kind of paint did you use? They look great. How did you seal the grain? I've been using Kwik-Poly, really works great but does require a bit of sanding prior to painting but goes very quickly. And that stuff is dry and ready to sand/paint in virtually 10 minutes.

Wayne, I ditto what you said too! I do have naturals on my '20 Roadster (came that way) but the spokes really should be painted, as opposed to natural.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:59 am:

Lots of folks love the naturals, but those are a modern fad. Yes, I know they eventually became an option, but they were uncommon even then (see Shorpy). And before the mid-twenties? Puh-leeze! I prefer my Model T wheels the way God and Henry intended.

Those look beautiful, and I like the high-tech paint booth (just like mine).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 10:51 am:

I have a good friend that has made the perfect solution for painting wheels.

He has taken a transmission and motor from an old washing machine and has adapted a spindle to the output shaft of the washing machine.

He mounts the wheel on the horizontal spindle and turns the motor on. The wheel turns slowly as he paints the wheel. Leaving the wheel turning after the painting is finished this eliminates the possibility of runs and drips. A cheap and effective way to solve a difficult problem.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 11:40 am:

Hanging a wheel by a wire allows a guy to hit all angles with his
rattle can of black paint with ease. What's all the fuss ? Henry Ford
and Farmer Brown would have you using a brush !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 12:42 pm:

Tim; I used Benjamin Moore Fresh start Underbody Primer; it's oil based and sands well. For sandpaper I used the 3M silicon backed ultraflex sandpaper; works great and doesn't clog. For the pinish paint I used Nason Ful-Cryl II single stage enamel. I used the Nason reducer and generic catalyst


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Bond on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

Nice work. I like the stand. Did a pair last year, wow what a lot of sanding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Why sand them ? To smooth off the wood grain and make the spokes appear to be made of plastic ?

KIA offers some delightful plastic cars these days. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 04:21 pm:

Thanks Gary!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

Nice job Gary. Here is what I have used for years.. It's just a piece of pipe clamped to the top of a saw horse. What could be easier?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sayer on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 11:21 am:

Gary those look great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

I just did my own wheels and know how much work they are to paint. Yours look terrific!

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 10:40 am:

I read somewhere that Henry dipped them into a drum of paint floating on top of water. Two coats of paint, one going in and the second coming out. No brushes, no stinking reducer.

TH


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