What do you use to seal thread fuel tank outlet

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What do you use to seal thread fuel tank outlet
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 03:21 am:

I have fitted a different outlet/fuel tap etc to my 26 using a standard pipe fitting that fits nice. I used permatex thread sealant by itself (was the only one of their products that was rated for fuel), It is a black gunk that doesn't actually set hard. Worked great for a couple of days but when I filled the tank today I noticed it is now seeping. When I was buying some fittings in town they suggested a "yellow" thread tape that is rated for fuel use but they had ran out of stock otherwise I would have used both together.
What works for you guys & what do you suggest I try?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 04:55 am:

Fuel Lube. Used on Aircraft. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 05:50 am:

I use liquid loctite 567 thread sealant that contains Teflon with great success
Alan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 06:16 am:

I agree with Alan, Loctite 567 PST is good for fuel lines, oil level plugs, head studs etc.

Here are the specs:

http://tds.henkel.com/tds5/docs/567-EN.PDF

Permatex have a similar product that is white. I wonder if you have their Pipe Joint Compound?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 07:03 am:

I used "Permatex Aviation form a gasket sealant liquid' as most sites said this was the best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 08:17 am:

Another vote for Loctite 567. Best on the market. A bit pricey, but goes a long way, and worth every penny. Never once a problem with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:21 am:

K&W Copper Coat worked great for me. On the shelf at my local NAPA store.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:26 am:

Have used the yellow teflon tape, no leaks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:44 am:

The Locktite 567 is a good choice, but I have also used a bar of soap for a "poor boy" in a tight spot fix. rub it into the threads, it has always worked for me, The other thing I have used is gas tank slushing/sealer. When I use a sealer like POR gas tank sealer, or some other brand, I save what is left in a glass canning jar. It will last a long time, and it works great to paint the threads with. The only thing about the gas tank sealer is you should wait 72 hours before adding gas. So for most fixes that is too long of a wait.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:44 am:

EZ Turn is a specialty lubricant/sealant used for fuel and oil line valves & is resistant to high temps. Especially effective where high octane fuels and aromatics are present. EZ Turn is also extremely efficient as a gasket paste & anti- seize agent. EZ Turn will not gum, crack or dry out. Each shipment is independently tested. Excellent for tapered plug valves, aircraft engine manufacturing, and marine applications.



http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/cspages/ezturnlube.php


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 10:24 am:

I`m very happy with FUEL LUBE (per Dan Hatchs post) Probably like the EZ TURN Royce suggests. Completely impervious to fuel degredation and lasts forever---excellent for all fuel line /carb fittings. Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 10:06 pm:

Thanks guys I'll see if I can buy any of those brands over here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 02:07 am:

I've had ordinary white Teflon plumbing tape in use for the last 12yrs with no problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 09:39 am:

I'm like JohnH. I use the white Teflon tape on my tractors and T's on all the fuel line joints.

Wrap several turns around the fitting and press it tight. I haven't had any problems. No need to spend a lot of money on exotic sealants. Just my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 07:09 pm:

I also have used the white tape in the past with no issues.
I cleaned the tank out a few weeks ago on my RHD speedster and when I reassembled it I used the white tape on the sediment bowl with no leaking from the thread. However the bowl is too worn, hard to turn off correctly, leaks and smells of gas all the time and they don't make new RHD versions for some reason so i thought I'll redesign. When I removed the sediment bowl there was some strands of the white tape that had been forced out and the fuel had eaten at it and it fell apart when touched over just a few weeks.
I have since read this is common and can result it little bits blocking in the carby etc. If I could have got the yellow tape I would have tried that with some gunk last week. It only started to seep after I filled the tank and after two extended drives this week the seeping is reducing so I guess it can't quite handle the extra pressure when the tank is full. I don't enjoy opening the garage door to the smell of fuel so I want it correct. The fuel tap is now after the tank fitting so that's no help when parked up.
Looks like loctite is the next option.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard A Eddinger Sacrament Ca on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 07:40 pm:

I use white teflon tape for air gas water and anything I want to seal with threads. With any kind of tape be sure to keep it away from the front of the threads if not pieces will get cut and end up in your fuel lines or whatever you are using it on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 10:40 pm:

Agree, ordinary white Teflon works great too. EZ Turn is great on the tapered valve to keep it from wearing out and leaking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

Most of the early carbs use a straight pipe thread
ie not tapered and the fitting seats in the bottom of the casting. The fitting is also a straight pipe thread 1/8 is 27 tpi and 1/4 and 3/8 are 18 tpi. Pipe dies are available and with some minor re-threading a standard tapered pipe fitting can be re-threaded with a straight thread and can be fitted into a straight pipe thread casting. These fittings require very little torque to seal as they seat in the bottom of the casting. They can be removed and replaced many times without leaking and Teflon tape or sealant is not required.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 07:09 pm:

Not with this fitting David it needs some sealant. What is interesting is it didn't leak with 3 gallons of fuel tested over several days then I filled the tank and found the seeping and smells of fuel. After 3 test drives I notice today it isn't seeping at all? I checked and it has 7 gallons of fuel so must be a fine line when the pressure is higher. I'm guessing white tape may have been fine like Royce, Richard etc but i'll try and get it right with loctite as I have some coming.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 08:48 pm:

Yellow teflon tape. Thicker and stronger. Will stop a leak when white tape won't. That's why it's mandatory for natural and propane gas lines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 10:32 pm:

No.2 Permatex will work just fine. This one of the 3 original Permatex sealants and the origin of the Permatex brand which is now on a bunch of products.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 08:56 am:

Gary's info is correct.... the yellow teflon tape is petroleum resistant, the white teflon tape will fail in those applications


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 09:17 am:

I use a product called SEALS ALL get it at aNY were this clear sealer is made to fix gas tanks
Gets hard and fills every void
To remove just on screw and it brakes off clean with ease
I have used it last 15 years with no issues


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 09:17 am:

I have used a product named REAL-TUFF ptfe paste thread sealant. It is rated for lines carrying gasoline. There are no leaks on my T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 10:14 am:

Off-topic question, but thread-related:

I have a Stanley steam car with a lot of exposed plumbing that carries fuel; hexane for the pilot light and kerosene or jet fuel for the main burner. It sounds as though this yellow teflon tape is just what I need, BUT I have to heat some of this plumbing with a propane torch as part of the firing-up process. Obviously, this is no place for a fuel leak! Will the teflon tape, wrapped around threads and out of sight, survive (and continue to seal) if I heat the pipes with a torch?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jake Henson on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 01:53 pm:

One thing to be noted with the permatex product, it says on the tube that cleanup is to be done with alcohol. Ehtanol in modern gas disolves permatex fuel proof sealant


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 02:15 am:

Gilbert i haven't seen the yellow tape in person yet so can't tell you if it would handle a blow torch, gut feeling the answer is no.
I've wanted a Stanley Steamer for years I think they are so interesting.
I redone all the joints today using Loctite 567 that a fellow forum member sent me to trial (Thanks). Going by the label this loctite can handle heat Gilbert have you tried it?
Guys how long should I leave the loctite to set before I add fuel to the system?, the tube doesn't say? I'm thinking I'll try 48 hrs to be safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 09:06 am:

I haven't tried the Loctite. On a Steamer, these joints have to come apart now and then so you can clean accumulated carbon out of the tubes. Loctite works really well at keeping things from coming loose, but works against you when you want to loosen them on purpose. That's why I was hoping a thread-sealing tape would work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 07:00 pm:

I fitted the Loctite 567 24 hrs ago and I put a small blob on my bench for a dry tester and today I notice it is still not set hard. I would say it doesn't go hard. Do a test on a unrelated thread for yourself. Loctite is a brand and not just a locker of threads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason, Whittier, CA on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 03:42 pm:

I believe the Loctite 567 is anaerobic curing, so it cures in the absence of air. The bit left exposed may not cure, or cure very slowly.
Best regards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 06:49 pm:

That sounds like it could be the case Brian, its a bit cold today so I might leave it a couple more days giving it 4 days to cure before adding fuel.
Thanks Guys


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 09:13 pm:

I use Loctite a lot, but I'll never use it for this application. Those sediment bulbs can be very difficult to remove after they've been in place for several years even without any sealant. Aviation Fuel Lube is the way to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

I removed the sediment bowl from the system as it was too worn and this model is RHD and nobody makes a RHD sediment bowl/tap? Weird as there must be a heap of RHD's on the planet. They are back to front by they way, fitted to the other side of the firewall above the starter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 02:03 pm:

I purchased a reproduction fuel valve from a reputable vendor for my 26 and it weeped, not at the pipe thread but at the valve it self. The fuel would leak into the carburetor and cause dripping. The qualifying literature that came with the part stated the valve was tested with 10 lbs of water and did not leak, however gasoline is much thinner and will find its way through where water won't. I had to therefore install an additional shutoff down stream of the valve.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

Gilbert,

Why not take two pieces of pipe and thread them together with the yellow pipe tape then place them in a bench vise and heat it with a torch to see it the tape can stand up to a heat application. Let it cool then take it apart and inspect the threads. Then you will know for sure if you can use it on your Stanley Steamer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 04:20 pm:

David -- You can smear a little aviation fuel lube on the valve's mating parts to get them to seal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 04:33 pm:

Surprised at the traffic here. Teflon tape. White or yellow. Both work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 07:05 pm:

Your right Charlie you never know when a thread will get a heap of interest or just die off after a few comments. I've learnt a bit from this one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 08:53 pm:

Dennis -

Great idea! Simple, cheap, and probably effective - the best kind. Thank you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 12:33 am:

4 days cured and put 7 gals in today, took it for a chilly 1 hr drive and looks good with no signs of seeping. The last test will be a full tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 02:57 am:

Well guys Loctite 567 is the go. been several days now with a full tank and driven about 100 miles and no sign of leaking or even seeping.
Perfect!
Thanks for your advice
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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 05:13 am:

Where did you obtain the pipe fittings? They look new and i would like to know where to find some if possible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 05:53 am:

Hi Kep, I was in Ashburton a week or so ago and I found a place called "Pipeline" and they had an extensive supply of bends, reducers etc. I got several reducers plus the thin tube all with the exact threads I needed. I already had the bend but I'm sure they had them also. The guy told me a vintage car guy came in one day and was so pleased to get everything he needed he said he would be back. The next week a van of 12 guys from the Timaru branch of the vintage car club had driven to Ashburton and got what they needed. Since then they have have also opened a branch up in Timaru. If there isn't one near you you can explain or send me down what you need and I'll buy it for you in Timaru in about 4 wks when next in town.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 03:49 pm:

Thankyou for that offer.


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