Treatment for wood trailer deck

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Treatment for wood trailer deck
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 03:54 pm:

I have a wood deck trailer which in 3 years old, sits outside. When new the deck was made from treated lumber. I need to put something on it to keep it. What do you guys use? A deck paint, a water proofer, linseed oil?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 04:09 pm:

A lot of people do not understand the dynamics of surface coatings, oils, paints,
stains, etc.

Oils such as linseed are best for repelling water absorption, and not trapping
water IN the wood like sealers will do.

The downside is the oiled surfaces can be slick. This may be a good thing if
you slide load materials on the deck, but one needs to be careful of that added
slickness for falling or load shifting.

Sealers, .... those with a "skin" surface coat, are rarely as pliable as the wood
and will have that surface cracked when the wood expands, letting in AND TRAPPING
all that moisture you want kept out of the wood IN the wood.

Oils, absorb IN TO the wood and move with all thermal expansion/contraction,
and thusly offer a near bulletproof water resistance. AND, you can go back over
it with more oil later when it starts to wear thin, ... something the paints and
sealers will require the stripping of the old in order to apply new.

Back when T's were being made, paint stores everywhere carried tinting colors
for oils. Shingle roofs, barns, EVERYTHING got sprayed down with oils, often
colored oils. Yuo can apply it with a Hudson sprayer. Super quick, super easy.
And a long lasting finish you can reapply with no prep. Just watch for slips ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb - Lake Forest - So. CA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 04:33 pm:

After a careful cleaning and a total drying, I painted my wood-decked car trailer with black enamel marine paint (for boats) and taped-off 15" wide tire paths on each side and used sand to provide a non-skid surface, over which I applied more black paint.
It looks terrific and after 50-years of owning and maintaining boats, I feel confident regarding the longevity of the marine paint.
The non-skid is essential.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hwdcne on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 05:32 pm:

This is where your old oil drained from your Model T is going to come in handy. Either spray or brush on. May not be the best coat, but better then nothing and best of all, free!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 06:30 pm:

Never did this myself, but when we lived in Western Montana, there was a huge number of cedar shake roofs on the homes, although, we had a composition roof. Eventually, I guess due to the sun, after a few years, those cedar shakes would dry out and turn gray, and begin to actually curl up. It seemed that the standard method of treating those cedar shakes involved linseed oil, made black with some type of powdered graphite. (....no idea where they got the graphite,....) It used to seem strange to see a neighbor's gray and weathered roof with a bunch of curled up cedar shakes, all of a sudden one day, the formerly gray roof was very black and the shakes would almost magically lay down flat again.

All that to say, it seems like maybe that linseed oil/graphite treatment might be a good thing for a wood deck on a car trailer. Just a thought,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry LaPatka- East Tennessee on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 07:22 pm:

BOILED Linseed oil and Mineral spirits - 50% - 50%
is what Truck Carriers and outdoor wood pro's use.
Works great on metal also. Use it on antiques, farm equipment, undercarriages, concrete coating
and other issues.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

This is all very interesting. I've never thought of linseed oil as an outdoor finish.

Question: What about termites, fungus, moss, etc ? Is the oil a food for organic attackers ?

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 07:42 am:

Wood that is exposed to harsh wet environments lasts longest when coated in marine spar varnish. That is why mariners use it. Linseed oil of any type simply does not compare in terms of protection. Ask anyone with a wood hulled Chris Craft if they would consider coating their boat with linseed oil instead of polyurethane spar varnish.

The most superior protection is offered by two part epoxy / polyurethane products such as Awlgrip. Next in line would be single stage polyurethane products like Minwax.

Moisture content in wood needs to be maintained at the level that it was when the wood was alive, or as close to that as possible. This is why a product that totally seals the wood is needed and desired. Ideally you would coat all surfaces to prevent moisture change in the wood, not just the top surface.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leck - Ohio on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 10:08 am:

A wood preservative recipe that has served me well for treating wood siding for rustic and naturally looking aging features (mildew and all) is the "Forest Products Laboratory Natural Finish". Works well for machinery preservative also.

application/pdfFPL Natural Finish
Natural Wood Finish.pdf (80.4 k)


It's basically 3:1 boiled linseed oil to mineral spirits/turpentine, with one pound melted paraffin wax melted and added per gallon of thinner. The recipe also calls for "Penta concentrate" as a chemical preservative but it has been deemed illegal by EPA years ago, there might be other preservatives available presently that are "safe". Check a log home finish vendor for that. I've never added colors, but you can. I do add a pesticide to keep the boring bees at bay; maybe not necessary for a trailer deck.

I'm also trying to decide what to treat my trailer's deck with, so thanks for the discussion.

What about straight Penetrol? I've always found it to be a finish similar to linseed oil, that dries faster without the gummy phase.

John


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration