New Gasket Material

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: New Gasket Material
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 07:02 pm:

I don't like the new gasket material they are using. I noticed oil running out below my valve chambers, so I took off the valve covers only to discover the gasket material was saturated with oil, just like an oil lamp wick. Has anyone else run into this problem?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

You using copper or those ones with the small strip of silicone or whatever it is in them? Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. I went back to copper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 09:27 pm:

I use the paper gaskets as patterns as I have found same thing they just weep after time I use blue rtv gasket maker on one side as well


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 10:40 pm:

I think Larry's talking about the other gaskets, made of paper stuff, not the head or water outlet/inlet gaskets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 01:43 pm:

I use this
http://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/CatalogItemDetail.aspx/Gasket-Material-Cork-Ru bber/_/R-FPB3006_0492845347
I can't get the paper to stop leaking


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 04:38 pm:

Like G.R. Cheshire, I use the cork sheet - same was what was used in the car originally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 04:39 pm:

Bad grammar -

Same as what was originally used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 05:16 pm:

I have gotten very good service out of rubberized cork, can get it by the sheet at the local real parts house, and in various thickness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Monday, July 13, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

I have used both: the gaskets in the kits from the vendors which appear to be cork, as well as getting rubberized and regular sheet gasket material. Blue RTV is fine for marine use but does not seal oil well. I use black Ultra RTV, but the secret is to have all the surfaces absolutely clean of all oil or grease residue. Apply an even coat of Ultra RTV, then let sit and cure for 24 hrs. The curing time is absolutely critical to having no leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 12:55 am:

I punch several holes in the paper valve cover gaskets above the lower sealing flange so the oil does not build up. The oil gets thru around the studs and forms a pocket of oil unless you add drain holes. Having a pocket of oil trapped between the gasket and valve cover.....its only a matter of time before the gaskets start to leak or oil leaks around the studs.
Just my thoughts.....others may not agree. However, it has been working on my model T for the past 15 years and other engines that I have re-built. I like using the black Ultra RTV the best but have also used blue RTV.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 09:16 am:

I drilled drain holes in my block over 50 years ago, because those early blocks don't have them. The problem is the manufacturer of the gasket sets. They need a better gasket material that doesn't absorb oil! Several years ago when they ceased using asbestos in head gaskets, Steve Coniff got on their case right away, and got them to change the core material between the copper, and now they are ok.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 10:06 am:

Larry, have you tried what I have suggested? I also drill drain holes in the block but that does not correct the oil build up between the gasket and valve cover. The oil gets between the valve cover and gasket thru the mounting stud. Try what I recommended....it "works". I know it is tough to accept a recommendation from a fellow 1913 model T owner that likes using water pumps and distributors....Smile!
Enjoy....Les


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 10:36 am:

On my former '27 Tudor I had a leak and was surprised to find the gasket only had 2 holes in it for the studs. It was a solid piece of Velimoid (sic). Don't know how common this is. Only did the one. The gasket had no slotted hole for the carb linkage but the metal cover did! Like Les most of the oil that came out was between the cover and gasket. Siliconed it and it worked out. Never thought of drain holes though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 10:47 am:

I do the valve cover gaskets as Les does, punching several holes near the bottom. I think it helps too.

I don't use water a pump or distributor, however. My T's run fine without those. :-)


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