Powder in tire when replace tube. Yes or No

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Powder in tire when replace tube. Yes or No
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alby Anderson on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 02:08 pm:

I have seen so many answers to this question on the internet. What do most of you do

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

One vote here for lots of baby powder, I rub it all over the tube and flap, then spread some more inside the tire carcass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leck - Ohio on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 02:30 pm:

Just changed a clincher on a demountable rim a couple weeks ago. It was my first T tire change and I followed Royce's pictorial guide for the hands-only, on-the-car change he posted here. Figured if I'm in a pinch (no pun intended) I'd better learn how to do it without tools. Skipped the baby powder, never understood what it was supposed to do other than make a mess. After a little time getting to know what the right positions are for everything it was pretty easy to get the tire on. And without fear of pinching the tube with irons. Probably the next one will take half the time- less than 15 minutes.

The old tire and tube had a flap and I put it back in. Didn't make it harder or easier to get the tire on. So it's in there to do what flaps do. (?)

Have fun!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenny Edmondson, Indianapolis on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 02:58 pm:

The Talcum powder used to be installed after patching a tire so the glued area of the tube patch wouldn't vulcanize to the tire. Not needed with a new tube.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 05:05 pm:

Yes the baby powder makes a mess, yes I still use it with any tire I put a tube in. It helps keep the tube from sticking to the tire during inflation--you learn the value of this when you mount 15" wide drag slicks run on 8 psi of air. I think this is another opinion topic like oil. To each their own, and use what works best for you. I will continue to use powder and be happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 05:10 pm:

I use a scented baby powder. I need the pretty odor to keep me calm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Max L. Christenson on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 05:31 pm:

Baby powder, talcum powder, no difference. Good to use. The powder reduces friction of all tire surfaces between the inner surface of the tire, the inner tube, and the wheel. It prevents binding and helps the inner tube lie flat against the tire and the wheel without puckers. I use baby powder, because my inner tubes like to smell as fresh as a baby's bottom in a fresh diaper.

NITROGEN

Also, filling the inner tubes with pure nitrogen, instead of ordinary compressed air, cuts down on moisture forming in the inner tubes. With nitrogen, the atmosphere in inner tubes is drier. Also, nitrogen is less likely to seep through the pores of the inner tubes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alby Anderson on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

Could someone give me the URL for "Royce's pictorial guide for the hands-only"

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 08:00 pm:

Alby, Royce's method will not work with your car. I see in your profile picture that you have demountable split rims. The rims must be taken off and collapsed in order to take the tires off. I don't use any talcum power when mounting tires.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Leck - Ohio on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 08:04 pm:

Alby, here's a link to the pictures.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/301983.html?1343386992


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 09:12 pm:

I vote yes to using talc or baby powder (same thing) It helps everything "settle in" better. New tubes used to be "talked" when you got them. Just one more of the things they do not do anymore, as part of making the best product they can ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 09:42 pm:

Lots baby powder your gal will go nuts how you smell


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 09:48 pm:

I also, do as Mark said. That's a big YES!

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 10:48 pm:

Yes for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:23 pm:

You can buy tire talc at better auto parts stores.

Also, it doesn't require much to dust the tube and the inside of the tire - not messy as some contend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 11:32 pm:

You have to be extra careful if you use powder in your tubes.

If you get stopped by the cops you might have a hard time explaining why your wheels have white powder coming out of them.
BUT it might divert their attention from the fact that you don't have turn signals, brake lights, or seat belts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 12:05 am:

I would think that a over abundance of talc between the tire and the tube would allow the tube to slip and walk within the tire from torque and cause the valve stem that's affixed to the rim to be tugged enough to be cut and leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 12:59 pm:

Baby powder is corn starch now.

It used to be talcum powder.

The aloe and vitamin e added does not help or hurt the tube, but it does promote healing, no matter how old the baby is or how the rash was contracted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 03:12 pm:

Since Camel made tire mounting powder as well as tire patches, I would say yes they use it. Scented or unscented will work equally well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Max L. Christenson on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 04:04 pm:

Yes, an "over abundance" of talc could cause slippage of the inner tube within the tire and the wheel, especially so if the tires are not inflated to specs or if they deflate. So, maintain the tire pressure. To prevent slippage to begin with, apply the talc thinly and then shake out the excess powder when the inner tube is installed in the tire. It does not take very much talc to work properly, just a light coat. Just don't overdo it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Friday, July 17, 2015 - 04:21 pm:

Yes, I use powder and put the tires on much like how Royce does with out tire irons.


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