Has anyone put film on windshield for safety?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Has anyone put film on windshield for safety?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 09:21 pm:

I know saftey glass would be the best thing but amazon has film that says is clear and will hold glass together for about 30 bucks it says not for auto use but if you put it on both sides it might be worth it? I have read the story about why Henry put saftey glass on model As.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

Most states require windshields to be safety glass.

FL: Windshields: Must be safety glass and may not be covered or treated with any material which has the effect of making the windshield reflective or in any way non-transparent. It must be free of any stickers not required by law.

Do the right thing for you and your passengers....install safety glass. Remove that old plate glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 09:49 pm:

Don't be Frugal with safety. Do safety right and you will never be sorry.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Grabowski on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 09:49 pm:

I just had new safety glass made for my 24 fordor. $65.00 for both pieces. Cheap peace of mind. I'm having the rest of the glass being made this week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Grabowski on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 09:52 pm:

That was for the windshield.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P.J. Thiessen-Elkhorn NE. on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 10:48 pm:

I just had safety "laminated" glass made for my 24 roadster for under $60. Thats cheaper than medical bills!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 11:26 pm:

Paul, I had to read your post a few times, I just couldn't believe it the first time.
Don't do it.
And I will apply this to the rest of your car too. The wheels, the brakes, the suspension, etc. Don't cheat yourself on safety.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 11:54 pm:

I'm sorry! Paul what the heck are you thinking? Put safety glass in! I value your life and I do not even know you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 12:42 am:

I use 3/16 laminated glass this is one step down from auto grade flat has slight tint of green but fits organza frames well and is not marked


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 01:22 am:

A film on both sides may help to hold pieces together, but it does not change the breakage characteristics of plate glass. You will still get shards of glass in a significant accident. Safety glass is tempered to cause it to crumble into pea gravel sized pieces. Even then, in a significant accident we see a lot of this crumbled glass all over the victims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 06:57 am:

Even a purist like me insists on safety glass. I have an old windshield frame laying around with a piece of original plate glass still in it. It is the sharpest object I've ever touched.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 07:34 am:

Laminated glass is that the same thing as tempered glass? Model T windshields are 1/4" thick. I don't see why you would want to use a thinner product? It would be loose in the glass channel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 07:42 am:

Any glass service shop typically deals regularly with flat laminated glass. It is used in more than just automobiles. What can be difficult is getting clear glass. The majority of what is used today has the green tint. My glass cutter could order the clear at a higher cost but I ended up putting in the green and it looks just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 08:47 am:

I use broken glass to scrape / shape wood in my furniture making, as was common period practice in the 18th century. If it can cleanly cut hard maple or oak under hand pressure, just imagine what it would do to human skin while being propelled at 30 (or more!) mph. Scary stuff, glass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 09:28 am:

Royce, laminated glass is 2 sheets of glass with a special plastic sheet laminated between the two of them. Tempered glass is a hardened glass that is designed to break into 1000s of little pieces when broken. You are supposed to have laminated glass for a windshield. and tempered glass for the side and rear glasses. Although it is considered OK to use laminated glass for side and rear glasses. Any good glass shop can get clear glass for you to use in the Ts as original. Most glass shops do not keep it in stock as there is little demand for it. Laminated glass is tricky to cut. You must cut both sides as a separate cut. Then the plastic film holding the two sides together must be cut. My friends body shop/glass shop uses lighter fluid to soften the film. He squirts the lighter fluid on the cut glass seam, and then lights it. This softens the seam to allow it to stretch just a little, and then finishes the cut with a razor blade. Tempered glass must be cut to size before it is tempered. You can not cut tempered glass, it will just break into a thousand pieces. So if you want tempered glass, the local glass shops usually must have it special ordered to your measurements or pattern. You can sand the edges of tempered or laminated glass to achieve the final fit, so we usually have my glass cut just a little large(about 1/32 inch) so we can "sand to fit" The main drawback to using laminated glass for side windows is sometimes the edge of the glass shows when the windows are rolled down. You can see the lamination seam in the glass when the edge shows. So for this reason, it "looks incorrect" for side windows as the manufactures did not use laminated for side glasses. Also if the edge is left exposed for a long time (usually years), moisture will start the lamination to fail and start to turn "foggy or hazy" around the edges. My friend always seals the edges of his laminated glass with 3-in-one oil. Just rub it on the cut edges and it helps to seal the edge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 09:43 am:

When I needed two windshield panes for my WWII jeep, my local glass guy had some old commercial glass doors laying around that were clear and cut my two panes from it. Tempered safety glass as is required by code for comercial doors. I think you need special tools to cut it, but they did so. New glass would be a green tint, so I went with the old dor glass. Fit perfect and if something gets thrown up from the road in front of me while driving, I don't have to worry about getting a close shave. I'm no lawyer, but I wonder what the insurance liability would be if, even though duplicating the original, someone got hurt because "regular" glass was recently purchased and installed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:27 am:

thank you all for the info. and concern the ads for the film show the glass being hit with hammers and stoping burglers but do say not for auto use. my thought was laminated glass has a film between two layers of glass so if it was put on outside it would work the same way.Robert I beleve tempered glass can not be cut once it is tempered mabey the glass guy had it tempered after cutting? L think there is a small mark put on corner of all tempered glass


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steve miller- mississauga,ontario on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:54 am:

Many automobile insurance companies and car clubs insist on laminated glass for windsheilds.
The Province of Ontario legislates "if a windsheild is replaced, the replacement must be safety glass"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 11:56 am:

I even changed out the little oval window in the back of my C cab. If something ever rolled into it from the bed the glass would go right to the back of the driver / passenger. I don't like the thought of getting stabbed in the back.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 01:41 pm:

Tempered glass is made by heating the glass to a certain temperature, then quickly cooling the surface. This puts a lot of surface tension in the surface, which makes the glass stronger, and also makes it crumble when broken. It is somewhat susceptible to breaking if hit on the edges. Robert, are you sure that glass was tempered that you got cut? I'd be quite surprised that that was possible. If those were old doors, maybe they were to an older requirement. There are classes of glass below "full tempering." The "logo" that marks tempered glass is optional. It's normally there to show glass is tempered, but you can request that it not be included when the tempering is done. You are also taking some risk if you sand or grind the edges of tempered glass to get it to fit. You usually can only get away with removing the equivalent of about half the glass thickness before you run a pretty good risk of the panel "blowing up."

You can make pretty cool looking panels for things like kitchen cabinet doors by putting clear film on both sides of a piece of tempered glass, then hitting the edge so it crumbles.

Laminated glass used in windshields is not tempered. It does not crumble like the tempered glass used in side windows, but is held together by the plastic laminate. It is also used to help keep passengers from going through the window and to support air bags in a crash.

Back to the original question, there are lots of film types that can be applied to glass for tinting, privacy, safety, anti-graffiti, etc. Some of the safety films are quite strong and would make the glass stronger than standard laminated glass. These are used in hurricane-prone areas to make architectural glass resistant to flying debris. If you filmed both sides, any broken glass would be held between the plastic so it might actually be less likely to cause injury. However, it's cheap enough to get laminated glass cut, that that's really the way to go. You'll have less risk of distortion and the surface will be easier to maintain. It is a good idea to seal the edges to hold off delamination.

Chris (who used to be in the glass business)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 01:49 pm:

When you change out to safety glass, do save the old plate, as those razor sharp shards are ideal for shaving wood wheel spokes clean, in prepping for paint or varnish :-)


Old plate glass round headlamp lens pieces make good scraping tools, have smooth rounded sides for holding!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 03:15 pm:

I wet sand the visible edges of laminated glass, and finish with polishing wheel (yes, be very careful or it'll break). Afterwards a rub with oil on the edge will make the laminate pretty much disappear. If you polish the edges that go in the felt channel, the glass will go up and down easier too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 03:39 pm:

What Ford used on the T!

We know better now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 04:56 pm:

That's cool. Must be a little later supply, as it shows "1923-25" wonder how long Ford supplied plate glass?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 07:26 pm:

You can order the edges polished from your glass supplier. It will cost a bit more, but save a lot of work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

Chris,
What the local glass shops called "polished" didn't fit my vision of polished, LOTS of sanding marks & a rough surface actually. That's when I came up with my solution. I think their wet sanding belt is just too coarse. I did learn to tape some protective paper or plastic to the glass just in case your sanding block slips.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 08:01 am:

Well, you got me worried, so I called my glass guy and my panes are, indeed, safety glass and NOT tempered. I got my terminology wrong.
He installed it with a fuzzy type of tape around the edge that he called mouse hair instead of using modern silicone or other caulk like material. Authentic and looks correct to the period for the 42 GPW.
Don't know what, if anything, was applied to the edge of the Model T panes to seal them in their frames.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 03:12 pm:

David,

Yeah, there can be quite a difference between shops on what they call polished! A truly polished edge is really polished, but not all shops have the equipment to do that. They would need to order it from their supplier that way. (Think of the edges on a glass table top.) Most of the non-auto glass that shops sell is mounted in frames so the edge treatment is not that important.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 03:39 pm:

Chris,
Yep, that was the standard I was looking for (manufactured glass shelving edges). I was surprised at how easily (other than elbow grease) I could achieve that kind of a finish, and it did improve rolling the windows up and down (after doing it once (for a Rolls-Royce, which originally would have had polished edges) I did it for a number of restorations after that; made a big difference in window functioning. Bucket of water, W&D sandpaper in a hand sanding block and away you go--and don't forget to mask the sides, as one slip is all it takes to make much more work.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration