Steve always makes it look so easy. :-)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Steve always makes it look so easy. :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 06:27 pm:

I had a great time this afternoon installing a new crank bushing in a car I'm building. However, removing the old one wasn't much fun.

Steve Jelf posted a demo thread some time ago which showed how easy it is to remove one of these bushings. He used a homemade device comprised of all-thread, a couple of nuts and washers, and a piece of pipe for a spacer. (I hope someone kept a link to that thread.) He made it look so easy I thought I'd try his method.

I went to Lowe's and purchased a length of 3/4" all-thread, 3 nuts, and a couple of washers to fit. I had a 1" pipe nipple to use as the spacer. I put a hacksaw blade through the bushing and tried to cut a slot in it until my arms got too tired to cut any more. So I rigged up all the parts and went after it using a big Crescent wrench with an 18" "cheater" pipe. Here's what it did to the 1" pipe nipple.

nip

I jacked up the front of the engine and heated the nose of the crankcase which had a death grip on the bushing until it was red all around (no pics, sorry). So I raunched on the big crescent with the 18" cheater some more, and all it did was crush the pipe nipple some more.

I finally gave up on Steve's method and took my cutting torch to the bushing.

bush

After that, all I had to do was tap it out using a drift and hammer. Here's Steve's rig being used to install the new bushing. It slipped right in, no cheater required.

rig

Pulled it flush with the front of the pan, and I was done.

flush

Time spent removing the old bushing, 2 hours. Time to install the new one, 2 minutes.

Next time I have to do this job, I'm going to cut to the chase and use the cutting torch first. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 06:51 pm:

Mike,

Good illustrated thread ...


Thank You !



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 08:40 pm:

I have never been happy with the slop that still comes with a new rolled steel bush from the vendors. I know it improves the situation, but it hardly is a precise fit.

I use a bronze bush, off the shelf, from my usual bearing house. This needs the length trimmed a bit, and a smidgeon turned off the OD, or it is too tight to push/pull into the pan snout. With a new section of 3/4" steel rod welded onto the crank handle, I end up with a nice job.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:20 pm:

It is true he made that look easy when he did it, but he did have trouble as I recall putting the new steel bushing in. I believe he ended up using a bronze bushing and it went right in.

I thoroughly enjoy people like Steve, Mike and others that make videos of how to fix a T, or just post great pictures and narratives.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:31 pm:

The front of the pan is sealed behind the crankshaft pulley with low fusing solder. If you saw some shiny metal running out of there you might have an oil leak now. I hope not, but if you do you can probably seal it up with RTV on the inside... yes that means pulling the engine out.

I suspect that pulling the engine out now might be a good idea. That pan probably can use a straightening now that it has been warmed up a bit.

IMHO... good luck and I hope I'm wrong!
TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

if you are going to pull the pan do it right braze up the dam and all the rivets on the inside then you will be done!!!!!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:57 pm:

The only part of the pan I heated was the nose where the bushing is, not the area where the dam is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

Mike -- The easiest way is to send it to Steve and have him do it. :-)

Yes Steve makes things look simple - You have to be impressed with his knowledge and ability - he makes things look easy when in fact much of it is because he is so very good!

I once worked with a guy from Buffalo NY that was a true craftsman with a plasma torch and welder.
He made it look simple so figured I could do it.
My attempts turned into a disaster. :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 11:01 pm:

It always amazes me how so many of these "tricks" sometimes work SO well! And then there are the other times. Several weeks ago, my son and I removed a damaged backing plate/rear housing end from a Ruckstell housing. I know most of the tricks, have read several threads talking about how easy it was to change the housing end. All that stuff. For Four hours Rob and I fought that stupid backing plate. Although it was badly damaged, I was still hoping to remove it in some sort of repairable state (I just prefer to not junk potentially repairable parts). It makes me sad to report, we destroyed it. The Ruckstell housing and tube are fine, the only thing we destroyed was the already damaged backing plate end that we were trying to replace anyway. After I chill out for another couple weeks, I will go back to the project and carefully remove the tube of the chosen donor housing from the backing plate that we hope to install onto the Ruckstell housing. If that doesn't work how I hope? I will carefully measure and cut the tubes and weld them like I have done a few times already. I know that works fine. But several people reported how easy it was to remove the rivets, heat, and pull the backing plate. So I tried it.
My recent experience for what it is worth.
I know, it often does work just fine.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, July 25, 2015 - 11:53 pm:

I've used the all-thread puller for spring and perch bushings, but I couldn't use it to pull the crank bushing out the front.


This picture shows why.


I had to resort to the good old hacksaw method.


Fortunately I had this auction bargain saw that made it simple.


I was able to use the all thread to press in the new bushing.


I did chamfer the end a little to help the bushing go in. I bought a couple of extras for future use.


Once the bushing was in I ran a " reamer though it. That made a perfect fit for the crank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, July 26, 2015 - 11:07 am:

That air-powered hacksaw is just the tool for cutting bushings. Gotta' get me one of those!


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