Timer brush experiment

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Timer brush experiment
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 02:37 pm:


The knock I've always heard on New Day timers is that the bronze brushes you often find in them are too hard and tend to wear out the case. Having heard that you can replace those with softer generator brushes, I decided to give it a try and replace this worn brush. The rest of the pictures pretty much explain themselves.











So far, so good, but then...




Apparently it's too soft. Maybe I'll try another one with a smaller and lighter spring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 02:57 pm:

"A" for effort


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 03:23 pm:

Good work Steve. I have to do the same thing for my New Day timer pretty soon. A guy I met over at the Mt 500 this year does this and said to be sure to use generator brushes so it looks like you're on the right track. PK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Spainhower - Portland, Oregon on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

Steve - I did mine a few months back. I went to a local electric motor shop, explained what I was doing, and they handed me a box of old brushes to go through. There were a lot of carbon brushes, and a few graphite. I had the same result you did with the carbon ones. The graphite was both harder and tougher, and ended up making a really good brush. That, plus an original New Day body resulted in a really reliable timer. The trickiest part was getting the spring tension just right (very light pressure).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

I made a carbon bush and used the spring that was in the New Day. I left the pin out of the side as it, my OP, is just used to keep the brush in place for installing. I drilled the hole for the spring on center to keep the force up centered. This was on my "S" experiment that ended in disaster. The fan belt worked back and tore a big hole in it and wiped the timer and brush out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

Best spring to use is one out of a ball point pen
which allows a smaller hole in the brush


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 10:27 pm:

We change the spring, not the brush. As David says, ball point pen spring works perfect. Also, are you using one of the old manufacture timers? They say "No Oiling" on them. We have found they are the best. Some of the repops are too soft and wear out quickly, especially with the heavy spring. It is best to have a modern seal on the cam when running a New Day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthony Bennett on Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 09:54 pm:

Have a go with a lighter spring and get yourself a starter motor brush that has an earth lead installed. I drill a hole in the back of the brush holder, drag the lead out, then solder the lead onto the brush holder. Not only does it earth the brush but it retains the thing without the need for a pin.

Works a treat ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 12:13 am:

You didn't show the little keeper pin operation!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 12:45 am:

So do you have to buy carbon off set credits if you run a carbon brush in your timer?:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 08:21 am:

Next time drill the hole with yer dremel. A lot less stress on the brush than using a larger bit.

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 08:26 am:

The brass brush works fine in original New Day timers with no oil. The brushes wear to nothing and the timer is still good. Just need to make one out of brass and then you are good to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 09:35 am:

My New Day experience is much the same as Royce's. The brass (bronze?) brush works well with a proper bakelite case. I've had trouble with the softer brushes tracking, which I believe caused a high-speed miss.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 10:23 am:

There appears to be two different styles of New Day brushes. One is smaller than the other, and I question if the larger one is old stock. Also, the slot for the camshaft pin doesn't seem to be in the correct place sometimes. If Snyders has the molds for this timer, why not make them again, but this time do the research and test them on running cars to make sure the cases are made of a hard enough material. I understand Gaslight made some that were more satisfactory, so what's going on with them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Robison on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 11:03 am:

Larry- Gaslights molds have gone missing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Glen Chaffin on Friday, July 31, 2015 - 12:55 pm:

Steve, Replacing the New Day Timer Brush with an old timer brush was original my idea. I have used it for years with no problems. Yes, the brush will wear out sooner but it will not tear up the mating surface of the timer, even the later reproductions that are softer material. It also is self lubricating. I have never had a timer miss due to this brush and use the original timer spring.


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