Radiator paint

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Radiator paint
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:32 am:

Can anyone recommend a good radiator paint? Rattle can is about all I need--Thanks, Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:37 am:

Eastwood has a good paint I have used before with good results.

http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-radiator-black-paint.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:53 am:

Cheap semi-gloss or flat black at the dollar store or Wal-Mart will work just fine.
Nothing exotic or expensive.

Ford didn't use anything special and if he did it was cheap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:56 am:

I assume we're talking fins and tubes here. One of my radiators was painted black when I got it. The others are unpainted and I'm leaving them bare. A black surface absorbs heat, and you want the fins to do the opposite. I must confess I haven't conducted a controlled experiment to determine whether it matters one way or the other, but until somebody proves otherwise I'm figuring it does.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 10:22 am:

Virtually all manufacturers painted their radiators black. I cannot believe that they would have gone to that expense if the black paint hurt heat transfer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 10:50 am:

Proper paint for a radiator is porous so the heat can dissipate.

Eastwood sell one: http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-radiator-black-paint.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:08 pm:

Ken is right. Only special radiator paint should be used, which will permit and promote heat transfer. Regular paint will seal tube and fin surfaces, blocking the efficient transfer of heat, thereby increasing the likelihood of overheating on a radiator that is prone to overheating anyway. Don't risk it. Get the Eastwood paint and do it right. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:10 pm:

Yes, do not spray your radiator with ordinary paint. Radiator paint is designed to transfer heat, yet help prevent non-conductive corrosion on the fins. Black transfers better than any other color. Many radiator shops will sell you a little bit of paint, bring your own container. That stuff you do spray on, you want as thin a coverage coat as you can do, a cheap "touch up" gun from a place like Harbor Freight is just right. Leave the radiator sit for a day after painting, as the stuff dries slowly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

Yes, do not spray your radiator with ordinary paint. Radiator paint is designed to transfer heat, yet help prevent non-conductive corrosion on the fins. Black transfers better than any other color. Many radiator shops will sell you a little bit of paint, bring your own container. That stuff you do spray on, you want as thin a coverage coat as you can do, a cheap "touch up" gun from a place like Harbor Freight is just right. Leave the radiator sit for a day after painting, as the stuff dries slowly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

The fins and tubes must be painted or they will corrode. Radiator paint from Eastwood is what I use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

I blame my recent spate of double posting on the dial-up connection I have to put up with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

That's okay David. Your posts are so good, I don't mind reading them twice. LOL! Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 01:18 pm:

Dave, most of us read it twice and don't know the difference until you fess up..hee hee


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 02:00 pm:

Use "Radiator Paint". That's what it's called. That's how it's sold. That's what it's used for. It's a specially formulated, low solid, low build paint for.... You guessed it, RADIATORS. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 07:51 pm:

Ford used 'radiator black' F-122 paint according to Trent Boggess's article under paint on the Model T encyclopedia on this website. The article says it was applied by air. Are there any surviving records that have the F-122 paint formula?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:07 pm:

While black is best at absorption of heat, it's also the best for radiating heat away from it's surface. The other method of heat transfer from a radiator is convection, the direct contact between surface and the surrounding air. Use special paint, any regular enamel will insulate the tubes and fins causing inefficient heat convection and possible overheating.

During the seventies and back, radiator shops used a black paint that was thinned with gasoline to be sprayed on....I remember using it, but making sure no smokers were around while spraying!

Eastwood a good choice....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 11:40 pm:

LOL, I have a story about a guy that painted his radiator a beautiful gloss black. This was over 25 years ago when I was a member of the Dallas T club. On his first tour with that car I happened to be behind him. I had a 5 gallon jug of water in my car and stopped many times to refill his car and refilled my jug at just about every service station on the tour. Most of you would have heard of him but I am not going to rat him out!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 12:06 am:

We painted a Model T radiator with Rustoleum black satin barbecue paint and have never had any problems.

I have a hard time believing that using anything but "radiator paint" will cause problems unless its loaded on so thick it narrows the space between the tubes and fins causing restricted airflow.

Also, I'll bet that the only difference between radiator paint and high heat rattle can enamel is the label.

I think it doesn't matter what is used as long as it's a thin coat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 01:14 am:

Paul Griesse. The value of this forum is that you are supplied with all the wise and unwise, as well as good and bad information you need to arrive at a decision based upon the logic of the advice offered and, as in most cases, you would be wise to follow the majority on this one. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 10:29 am:

Erik,

Any paint that has any appreciable "build" to it will act as an insulator. Radiator paint leaves a very thin build thickness.

Additionally, the flat black color is the best at radiating heat. In the science of heat transfer, it's referred to as a "black body radiator" or a "black body emitter", and for the purposes of transfer analysis & calculations, is assumed to be an "ideal" emitter of heat energy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 10:42 am:

We use lamp black it is a power it is what was used 50 plus years ago. Cheers Colin


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