Ever climbed Mt. Washington in your T?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Ever climbed Mt. Washington in your T?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 09:45 pm:

Back in the late 70's, my Grandfather went on a tour to New Hampshire where the tour goers climbed Mt Washington in their antique cars. It may have been a Glidden tour, but don't know for sure. Anyway, he was driving his 1915 Hudson, 6-40 Touring when he tackled that hill.

Anyone here ever climbed to the summit in a factory stock Model T? I'm thinking that would be a memorable trip!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Saturday, August 01, 2015 - 11:27 pm:

James,
Do you have any pics of the Hudson?
Here's my '14...pretty much the same as '15.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 07:30 am:

Bob,
Your car is BEAUTIFUL! Attached are two pictures of the Hudson our family had and it was the same blue as yours except with a black hood. My Grandfathers name was Fred Long and he bought the car from the original owner in Maryland in 1952 and restored it. IT won it's senior in 1961. The car was in our family up until 2003 at which point my uncle sold it. It's now owned by Marty Roth in New Orleans. The little kid in the drivers seat is me when I was 12 back in 1976. The photo was taken in Bridgewater, Virginia. The other photo is on the movie set during the making of the movie "The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell" staring Hal Holbrook. That was in DC in late 54 or early 1955.

My grandfather had two cars... the Hudson, and a 1925 Model T Coupe. He purchased the coupe in 1948 before he found the Hudson. I am happy to say that the Coupe is safely tucked away in my shop with my other cars!hud1Hud2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 07:44 am:

Drove my '14 up Mt Rushmore. LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 08:45 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 08:48 am:

Thanks for posting the pictures James.
In the late 30's mine was in a wrecking yard in Enumclaw, Wash.
The second owner before me rescued it. That's as far back as I can trace it.
Pretty much an original car except for paint and upholstery.
I've had it since 1976.
I have 4 T's also just to keep on topic!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 01:07 pm:

Too funny Steve!! Hal Holbrook... Gary Cooper details, details!!

Bob, Glad you liked the pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 04:14 pm:

Those Hudsons are great cars! I know of several of them, a couple that are driven a lot. One, nearby in the Sacramento area is driven more than any other non-Ford HCCA car I know of, and has been pictured in the HCCA Gazette several times. A fantastic, and reliable, car.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 04:30 pm:

Bob - You're right! Those two Hudsons are very much alike. Fun to compare the two! Nice front bumper on James' Hudson, huh? Something for you to watch for at swap meets, right? I sure like that Hudson of yours,.....a big, roomy, comfortable, heavy built and good running, built like a battleship "old -timer" like a Dodge!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 05:55 pm:

What's the story with the yellow reflectors ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 07:03 pm:

I saw those, but didn't pay them much attention as I have seen others on cars of that era. It is not the reflectors. They are amber lenses. It was one of many silly ideas tried in the mid to late '10s to avoid "blinding " other drivers with those ultra bright electric lamps! (They were actually offered and used for acetylene lamps also.)
It truly amazes me that lawmakers and entrepreneurs were so concerned about those "bright" lamps blinding people when we today worry about them being bright enough to even use for driving. Part of it is all about what we are used to. But I was totally opposed to the nationally adopted headlamp standards adopted nearly 30 years ago. Low beams since then are nearly as high and bright as the high beams were limited to by law in the 1960s. I ALMOST NEVER use the high beams on a modern car. I do NOT need them. I do have problems (which I have long since learned to deal with myself) with being blinded by other people's lamps regardless of whether they use high or low beams.
Sorry for the drift. Anyhow, that is what those amber lenses are about. I have even seen new-old-stock lenses with the original packaging at swap meets. A very few municipalities even required such measures back in the day.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 09:41 pm:

From what I know, the yellow reflectors were on the car when my grandfather bought it in 52. I have a photo of my mother as a teenager sitting on the front bumper in 1958 and the reflectors were on it then. I think they look kind of neat...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ernest Clerihew on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 11:06 pm:

To answer the original question, I drove my 1914 Model T cut-off pickup (I have since found a proper rear section and it is now the touring car it originally was) up Mt Washington, New Hampshire on Aug.8, 2003.
The car had the original (but patched up) round tube radiator and I had just rebuilt the engine with newly babbited rods and mains, aluminum pistons, new valves and adjustable tappets. I have always used a New Day timer. Also, Kevlar bands. Everything else was stock.
Because we were an antique, they did not charge us a toll for the Mt Washington Toll Road. At the base of Mt. Washington that day it was 75 degrees and cloudy - pretty much ideal weather. I had to do my own research about what coolant to use since there is no information available about boiling points of antifreeze mixtures in a non-pressurized system. So I cooked a 50/50 antifreeze mixture on the stove: boiling point 228. Then I cooked 100% antifreeze: boiling point 290. I went up Mt Washington with straight antifreeze in the car.
The Mt Washington Toll Road was combination of gravel and pavement at that time and steep all the way. I had my foot mashed down on the low pedal for 8 miles, making 5 or 6 stops whenever steam starting coming out of the radiator cap vent hole. At these stops, there were water hoses which we used to pour water over the radiator til things cooled down. Each stop took about 10 or 15 minutes and we started climbing again. The entire trip up took almost 2 hours. In a real car, you can do it in about 25 minutes I think.
When we were up on top I could finally affix the bumper sticker: THIS CAR CLIMBED MT. WASHINGTON. Fantastic views and about 20 degrees lower temperature. One woman up there didn't believe we'd driven the car there, so I told her "Well, we sure didn't carry it up here!"
Going down was just like going up in that I had the low pedal hard to the floor for 8 miles. I used the brakes very little and of course it was faster going down hill and the car didn't need any cooling at the side of the road.
It was an exciting and better-than-expected trip. To top it off, nothing broke!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 07:32 am:

Ernest.... Thanks for the description of your trip up the mountain. How'd your left leg feel the next day??!!


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