Early Steel vs. Late Steel

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Early Steel vs. Late Steel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Fenrich on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 04:20 pm:

I'm reading my Standard Catalog of Ford book which is very handy for differences for each year. One thing they lack though is interior photos. Virtually every photo in the book is of the exterior in either 3/4 view or profile view.

Some changes I am unclear of is how the instrument panels looked like. Prior to the ammeter, ignition, and headlight switch set up of the late steel and "improved" T's up to 1927, was it just like the old coil box on the brass cars? Did it differ if the car had an electric starter and generator?

Also, I would much prefer a car with demountable rims. Have a lot of the cars today been converted to demountable rims even if they haven't left the factory with them?

Was the rear tire mount standard on roadsters? From photos I've looked at, they seem a lot more common on late steel roadsters than early steel ones around the 1917ish mark.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 05:02 pm:

Ryan -- The demountable-rim wheels became available on Fords early in the 1919 model year. Cars equipped with them came with a spare rim and a mount to hold it, on all body styles. Tires were very expensive, so the spare tire and tube were extra-cost options. Before the advent of demountable rims, there was no provision on Fords for a spare tire unless it was an aftermarket item. And yes, many earlier cars have been converted to have demountable-rim wheels. They're pretty handy.

Before Ford built cars with starters, they had no instrument panel. The ignition switch was on the coil box, and the headlight switch was on the firewall, except that 1918 (& later non-starter cars) had a combination horn & light switch on the steering column.

Cars with starters and generators had an instrument panel with the ignition and light switches and ammeter in mounted in it, and the horn button on the column.


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