Engine Knock Investigation

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Engine Knock Investigation
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 06:57 pm:

Ok, here are the details:

1919 Speedster with RAJO Model 30 head, engine rebuilt in 1980. Was out of the car and hadn't been run until early last year when I got the car back together. New aluminum pistons, new valves and guides, new pushrods, springs, tappets, new cam bearing, new aluminum cam gear (standard timing), stock used cam, stock used diamond crank (ground), new babbit in bearings, rods, caps. I have a Texas T distributor, and Champion A25 plugs. Stromberg RF carb, with a Carter fuel pump and Holley regulator at 1.5 lbs pressure. No mag, but I do have slingers (the good ones). New bronze thrust washers in the differential. I run 10w30 oil, good radiator with 50/50 mix. Cotton bands new last year. Have changed oil three times in the first 700 miles. Have not found any significant problems in the oil when checking or changing it. I typically run it just at the top petcock, and check it often. Ran all last year and earlier this season with no problems.

In recent weeks, the engine has developed a knock. I don't believe it's spark knock, as it's there pretty much all the time, whether the spark is advanced or retarded. The knock can be heard at idle, under load uphill, cruising down the road on level, and coasting downhill. I've checked the crank pulley (ran it with the fan belt off; knock was still there) and the generator/cam gear mesh, and all looks good. No fore/aft movement in the timing gear or crank gear, no metal bits of any kind anywhere.

I shorted each plug, and the only change was that it seemed more pronounced when shorting #4. I've also now pulled the crankcase inspection plate, and see no obvious problems (yet).

Here's a link to a video. It's more so you can hear the knock. https://youtu.be/ilWMhwHovoA

Please let me know what you all think. I've read a bunch of past threads about the various causes of engine knocks, but sometimes hearing how it sounds can be telling to those with experience.

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

That's not a "knock" like I ever heard......more of a tick that's occurring at 1/4 of the crankshaft speed.......?
Sounds like a lifter to me.
This oughta be interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 07:24 pm:

Craig,

With the RAJO head, the lifters are short, moving the spring-loaded pushrods that push the rockers.



Perhaps I should remove the side covers and check those as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Chaffin......Corona, CA on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 08:10 pm:

What diameter are your pushrods?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

Sounds like valve train noise to me. Probably not a serious problem.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 10:26 pm:

Mark - Pushrods are 5/16" diameter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Chaffin......Corona, CA on Sunday, August 02, 2015 - 11:53 pm:

What is the ID of the valve guide holes? The reason I ask is the pushrods move inboard and outboard with each cycle of the rocker arms which may cause them to come into contact with the guide holes in the block and or head. The head guide holes appear much larger (by design) than the pushrods. Is there adequate clearance in the block. Could possibly be the source of the noise if not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 07:48 am:

Is one of the rockers worn out or the shaft galled? It sounds like excess valve clearance on one valve. Measure valve clearance on each rocker and you will find the problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 08:16 am:

Royce - I thought it may have been valve clearance as well. I had set them all at .015" last year when I had first started the engine, and it ran fine. I just checked them and reset a few last week. They intakes are at .012" and the exhaust are at .015". This did not eliminate or change the ticking sound. Regarding the pushrods, I'll need to check them by removing the side covers as I noted, and pulling them out. Probably will need to remove the rocker stands also to get the pushrods out.

Mark - I'll have to measure when I get some time today, as I noted responding to Royce, I can measure the hole clearance in the head, but will need to remove the side covers (and likely the pushrods and rocker stands) to get to where I can measure them. The problem may present itself when I pull the covers off.

I'll get back to you. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:55 am:

An easy way to find if it is a valve. Just take a .012" measure plate and pass it between the valve and the rocker on each valve while running the engine. The noise will go away, you have found which valve have a problem, but...

I don't think it is a valve or push rod. I more think about the third mean bearing or a connecting rod. If the inspection plate is off, just try, by hand, if you can move the connecting rod back and forwards. If you can move it easy by hand, without a small hammer, the rods need to take care off.

Good luck
Andre
belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 10:42 am:

Could be a sticking valve. The clearance may be o.k. but if the valve is "sticky" is will make a noise when the rocker hits it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 11:38 am:

Dave,
What you can do is:
Take a steel bar about 50cm long and 10mm in diameter. Hold one end to your ear and the other end to the engine and change place on the engine till you can hear the noise clearly. Look at that place for the problem.
I listen again to your video and for me it is a connecting rod because the noise become clearer as you get under the car near to the oil pan.

Good luck
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 12:16 pm:

Sounds like crank rods, or mains to me, just like Andre said.

Sound is to deep for valve train.

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

It seems to be at 1/2 crank speed, so probably isn't rods or mains. My guess would be wrist pin. It is not uncommon for a loose wrist pin to make noise only on the intake stroke, hence the knock is at 1/2 crank speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 12:45 pm:

Dave - Shorting out one spark plug at a time makes no difference to the knock?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 12:49 pm:

I'd like to think maybe the crank pulley and/or pin, but that's at the wrong end of the engine!

Inserting a feeler guage in between lifter (tappet) and valve stem of idling engine would change sound of noisy tappet.

Hate to think rod bearing, but thats what it sounds like to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 01:56 pm:

Tear it down and see!

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 06:40 pm:

Just wanted to say thanks to all who have posted here with advice, comments, and suggestions. All are appreciated.

Turns out I didn't have time today to get the side covers off to check the pushrods and lifters (still work for a living), but that's my next step, as well as checking the rods for movement. When I pulled the inspection plate off, I attempted to move the rods by hand, and was unable to move any of them at all. I need to spend a little more time under the car, turning the crank and checking rods and main bearings more closely.

I'll keep you all posted as I progress toward (hopefully) a solution.

Thanks again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 06:51 pm:

Dave,

You need to check clearance on each rocker with the lifter on the heel of that cam lobe. You have to rotate the engine to TDC on the compression stroke, where both intake and exhaust should be on the heel. Repeat for each cylinder. I think you want to see .018" clearance or thereabouts. Every pushrod needs some clearance, all should wiggle up and down at this point in rotation for each respective cylinder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 06:56 pm:

My guess would be wrist pin. Just recently fought a noisy engine noise and one of the causes was worn pins. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 11:55 pm:

A loose flywheel will make a knock sounding like a loose rod bearing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

Dave,

Also keep in mind the possibility of a wrist pin that's seizing in the piston. Happens sometimes in new rebuilds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 06:51 pm:

UPDATE: It's not the pushrods. Pulled them and checked; all are in good condition, no galling, or bends. Nice and straight. All have clearance in the head and the block, so I don't think the problem is there. Valves also are all free, and moving without sticking. Rechecked clearance on all (following Glen Chaffin's procedure as before), and all are good.

I removed the spark plugs to be able to spin the hand crank easier, and heard the noise once per turn at the same point when cranking speed was constant. When looking at the rods, caps, and mains, I found a few things; one I know is a problem, the other may be.

This is #4 cap, on the front side.





Also, I took a short video to show lateral movement of the rods. all are about the same.

https://youtu.be/Af_oPY3Ag-Q

With the rod movement, the entire rod moves, not just one end. When I move the bottom end, the top moves as well.

Obviously the cap needs replaced. Any other opinions, comments or suggestions? All are welcome and appreciated, as always.

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 08:05 pm:

Sounds like rods and or mains. The thrust on that cap looks really bad. Chipped off and I don't think you should be able to see a gap between the journal and rod, may just be my eyes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

When the pin end moves over the rod would hit the piston boss.

Just hope the wrist pin hasn't dug into the cylinder wall yet.

It is going to take more then a cap.

Rods that are out of alignment will break the flanges off.

The cap you are showing was not tinned right, or they burnt it off again pouring at the wrong temp.

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 10:41 am:

Dave,

When you hand crank the engine and hear that noise, does the rod also move fore & aft, as it did when you pushed the rod by hand in your video? (May need an assistant to crank as you observe.)

If it does, you've got a bent rod. And, if you've got one bent rod, you've probably got 4.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 12:52 pm:

Yeah, I'll need an extra person to crank while I watch from underneath. If it's bent rods, I wonder why it didn't make noise before this (last year)?

Thanks Jerry, Herm, and John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach & Big Bear on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 01:18 pm:

Our 1913 Touring had a bad knock and we sold the car. The new owner simply straightened the twisted rod and took the noise away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 02:51 pm:

Dave,

Probably took a little time to beat out the babbitt enough to knock. Before that it was probably just binding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Batta - Dayton, Ohio on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 11:07 pm:

Dave when do you need a hand? Call me. I will be around this weekend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 04:44 pm:

Dave,
It will be just as Herm said. A rod that is out alignment and a bad pouring job. Just take of the cylinder head and take out the four pistons and rods and check the rods for alignment and babit condition and repair what was done wrong and you will have a fine running engine.

Good luck
Andre ( just back home from Spain)
belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 01:06 pm:

Update: I removed the #4 cap, rod and piston. Here's what I found on the cap and rod:











So far, everything else looks good. No other babbit chipped or lose, crank journals look good. I suspect, from the pattern of babbit loss on the cap and rod, that the rod has a slight twist that caused the babbit to fragment off both the cap and rod edges.

Also took a shot of the top of the block, and the bottom of the RAJO head. A little carbon, but otherwise all looks good.





Hope to get a replacement rod and cap soon, and get it back together. Again, thanks to all who have contributed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 01:30 pm:

Looks like a poorly prepared rod and the Babbitt looks funky too. I would replace all four if they came from the same place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 03:50 pm:

Replace all four or you will be taking your engine apart again very soon. The babbiting job on the rod shown is badly done and it is natural to expect the others are the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 05:15 pm:

For what I can see it's no wonder it flogged out, the rest will too, there's been no provision for oil!! no dippers are bad enough on a higher preformance T, but nothing at the parting lines for oil swiping as well! BANG!!! your lucky it didn't throw it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 06:50 pm:

Frank - I know what dippers are, but what's the reference to "nothing at the parting lines for oil swiping"? Not sure what that means.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 09:10 pm:

Dav, Ford didn't use shims on the big ends so a chamfer was put on the babbitt cap and rod at the parting line, this would allow an oil swipe at 180degrees apart.



On a rod with shims, that gives ample oil line but a well cut in the babbitt makes sure that there is ample oil to swipe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 09:47 pm:

Got it. Thanks for the explanation Frank. Much appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 11:35 pm:

A question for the Babbitters--It looks to me like the babbitt was poured on a cold rod, chilling the metal and also no bonding to the tinning (IF it was tinned). The babbitt looks pretty porous to me, caused by the chilling?
Just asking for the knowledge, nothing else!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 01:05 am:

David,
The bearing was not properly bonded to the rod and cap. To do so requires precise control of the temperature of the babbit to be poured as well as the temperature of the rod and cap to be poured. Absolute cleanliness of the items to be poured and properly tinning them is essential. Anything less than perfect bonding of the bearing results in poor heat transfer and the bearings will disintegrate under load, as this one did. It is all about temperature and timing when pouring babbit. It is more art than science.
How is the Oroville Buick doing? I would like to drive it again sometime. To be the first in decades was an honor, it is a fine automobile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 12:42 pm:

So, my crankshaft journals measure 1.229" - 1.231". I'm assuming it was ground to 0.020" undersized when the rebuild was done in 1980. So I take it that I need new rods/caps (with shims in place) that are also 0.020" oversized? Also, I've read that Snyders are good; any recommendations on other vendors? Looking at Ron Miller's shop that's not far from me also. He's got a great price on a set, so if they're good, I'll get a set from him. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 01:22 pm:

Kohnke rebabbitting would be a good place also, rods will be checked & true with great care and excellent attention to proper adherence of the Babbitt on the rods & caps. The Babbitt if that's what it was in your rods has a hi degree of porosity and granulation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 03:08 pm:

Dave,

I tried the three kinds of rods Snyders is offering and they are all good but before I set them in the engine I went to a machine shop to check them and they were always ready to be mounted in the engine. Texas T parts had also good quality rods.

Good luck
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 05:04 pm:

Thanks, guys. I've been in contact with Joe Bell in Tiffin, OH also, and we may be able to work out a solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, August 16, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

Erik,
AFAIK, the Buick is doing fine. The spark & throttle rods have their tensioners, and the horn button is in, and working (and the horn honks--I added a horn relay to reduce load on the button). I was going to work on the door hinges, etc. but have found the City Administration seems to not want me around, & they are allowing lots of other folks to drive the car, so I have stepped out. Jan can still get you access to the Buick.
That's what I figured on those rods, just wanted to know if I'd analyzed it correctly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 01:23 pm:

David,

With either Ron's or Joe Bell's work you'll be in fine shape.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 07:41 pm:

So, I fit my new rod and cap that I got from Joe Bell. Joe had drilled both the rod and cap for oil. Test fit without the piston first, and it was a little tight. Used a bit of yellow Timesaver, and it worked well. Installed the rod in the piston, and then into the block. Rotated the crank by hand, and all looked and felt good. A little tighter than it was before I took it all apart, but I expected that it would be. Still can crank it over by hand without any problem.

I got it all back together, put oil and coolant in, and hand crank started it. Ran it for about two minutes and shut it down. All seemed good. Let it cool down for two hours, checked fluid levels, and started it again (hand crank). Heard something rattling around in the crankcase. Sounds like a nut moving around every so often, being splashed around by the oil. Shut it down after running for only a minute or two.

Looks like I'll be draining the oil and dropping the pan again tomorrow to check it out. Can't hear it when I crank by hand; only when it's running. I'm sure I didn't leave any loose parts inside. Used cotters on the rod bolts, and safety wire on the wrist pin bolt around the end of the rod.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:03 pm:

Hi Dave,

"and safety wire on the wrist pin bolt around the end of the rod."

I think that you are better off with a cotter pin in that location. My two cents worth, perhaps overvalued. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:19 pm:

Bill - Thanks for the note. I've read been past treads about using cotters rather than wire, and about using lock washers as well. Seems some prefer one over the other for various reasons. My other three wrist pin bolts were wired, so I used the same process. Not saying it's better, and perhaps you're correct. If the rattling I heard is the safety sire I just put on, I'll be happy to replace it with a lock washer. I hope that's all it is, but I'm thinking it's something more "substantial" than wire. Sure sounds like it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

I agree Bill, but one thing in Dave's favour is, if the wire comes adrift, the engine is not running a magneto.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

Probably one of the other rods has lost its babbit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 09:16 pm:

Royce - It's possible, though there's no knock when it's running, and the rest of them looked good. I'll find out tomorrow and let you know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 15, 2015 - 11:35 pm:
A question for the Babbitters--It looks to me like the babbitt was poured on a cold rod, chilling the metal and also no bonding to the tinning (IF it was tinned). The babbitt looks pretty porous to me, caused by the chilling?
Just asking for the knowledge, nothing else!"END QUOTE"

Chilled babbitt will look smooth.

The babbitt in the rod was way to hot, probably in a ladle with a torch, or a single burner small pot. In any case, it is burnt, and heavily crystalized. Crystalized, is when all the metals separate.

With out heat regulation, on babbitt and shell, your guessing.

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 12:44 am:

Herm,
THANKS!! That makes sense, and I hadn't thought about the babbit being "burnt". IMHO, Babbitting is a science and an art, because temperature is critical, as is the metallurgy (you have to know what's in the pot & that it hasn't been corrupted by old babbitt, etc.) and the preparation of the rod/block/cap has to be done correctly. The art is in the ability to pour the molten metal properly, and having the "sixth sense" (actually all four senses together) that tells one when things are "right."
Lots of respect for those that master this process.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 12:51 am:

Great thread and pictures....
I would have guessed the Babbitt was too cool, interesting that too hot is more than likely the problem!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 01:41 am:

Dave, didn't you check the other rods??
If one is bad, the other have done the same road and could be bad too. Just check them all and replace what is bad. It will not be cheap but it is cheaper than open and close the engine for every cylinder apart.

Good luck
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 09:55 am:

So I dropped the pan this morning and found the cause of the rattling. It's a piece of wadded-up sheet steel. After I unfolded it a bit, it's about two inches long. Found a few other small pieces also while feeling around inside. The new rod, and all the rest look good, as do the main bearings.

Any ideas what it might be?






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 09:58 am:

So I dropped the pan this morning and found the cause of the rattling. It's a piece of wadded-up sheet steel. After I unfolded it a bit, it's about two inches long. Found a few other small pieces also while feeling around inside. The new rod, and all the rest look good, as do the main bearings.

Any ideas what it might be?






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:00 am:

Sorry for the double post. First time I've ever done that. Probably won't be the last!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:23 am:

Hard to tell, but could it be the funnel part of the oil line?

Crank the engine with on of the front oil pan bolts off - if the oil distribution works as it should, I think oil should be flowing/dripping from the hole even at hand cranking speeds after some turns?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:32 am:

Roger - It's possible. I've got the inspection pan off, so no oil in the pan to check flow. Any other way to check that doesn't involve pulling the hogshead off? Or any way to visually inspect? I do have an accessory internal oil feed along the driver's side of the pan. That looks fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:56 am:

Find the problem, don't guess. Pull the hogs head and look to see if the oil funnel is in place. I think you are going to pull the engine to solve the mystery and replace what is damaged. That most likely includes the magneto coil ring. That piece of metal likely cut into the coils. Let us know what you end up doing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:57 am:

If your mag coil ring is removed, or even if it isn't, you may get a peak at the funnel with this: http://www.amazon.com/Solar-Eclipse-SE001CAM-Inspection-Monitor/dp/B003629WRQ/re f=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1441292115&sr=8-10&keywords=fiber+optic+scope

Very cheap money versus yanking the hog's head, in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

Jerry - You're correct; no mag in the speedster. I have oil slingers on the flywheel. Camera looks like it may be the way to go.

Jack - I don't see how it could be anything else. There's nothing else inside that it could be. I'll likely have to pull the hogshead anyway to replace the oil tube.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 02:33 pm:

Dave,
I don't think you can get the oil tube out without taking the flywheel and transmission off the crankshaft.

Good luck
Andre Belgium


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