Congressional action required.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Congressional action required.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 05:35 pm:

I like driving a Model T on country roads, ripping down a dirt road through the countryside at 20 to 25 MPH. But when I hit a patch of washboard, 10 MPH is too fast. I propose that we all write to our representatives and senators and ask them to quit squabbling and pass a federal law against washboard. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 06:18 pm:

I think that's a great idea, particularly in light of the fact that our tax burden is already sufficient to pay the cost.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 06:38 pm:

Steve

You need these!




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 08:23 pm:

While they're fixing washboard, they might work on those roads Chris Paulsen's been driving on the centenary of Edsel's Detroit-to-San Francisco trip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:13 pm:

Steve, when are you going to learn? Congress doesn't pass laws, the administration writes regulations. What you need to do is write to our esteemed regulator-in-chief and explain to him that washboard roads in Kansas are a major contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Send him some bogus data to back it up and, within a month or so, he will have the EPA produce 10,000 pages of pavement regulations that will cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, and you will be able to drive to town at 25-30 mph... It's how it's done these days. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

You need to tie it into climate change. Perhaps the manufacture of more tires to replace those lost in the washboard roads, or the additional gas needed because of the friction of riding over the washboards etc. The main reason for the problem is that they spend the tax money for themselves or their employees or those who vote for them. They leave the most visible problems undone so they will have a reason to raise the taxes. After the taxes are raised, the process is repeated and so the cycle goes.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

Gil,

I heard you provided the lead in finding Edsel's Journal.

What a fantastic document.

Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:41 pm:

Kirk, I sort of blundered into it. I was in my T one day when a man asked me a question. We started talking, and he told me about this great trip his father had taken with Edsel and four other guys. Edsel had given each participant a copy of the trip scrapbook, and he had his father's. If I'd false teeth, I'd have spat them across the room.

The scrapbook was in pretty fragile condition. I talked him into getting some archival quality CDs made. One went to the Horseless Carriage Gazette, which printed many of the pictures and captions. Another, along with the original scrapbook, went to the AACA library.

Sorry for the thread drift.

Gil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:48 pm:

There was a really bad street in Oakland that I work on two days a week.
It was all chopped up, chuck holes everywhere, etc.
The people that live and run businesses on that street got together and made a video.
They had bikes, trikes and walking canes laying all over the street while about 20 folks were laying in the street in various positions.
The day after the video, last month, was submitted to the supervisors there was a crew working on the street.
First they filled in the holes, then they paved the street one block at a time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Monday, August 03, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

What is a washboard? We don't have any in Wisconsin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 12:20 am:

Here you go, Dave. A bit of washboard for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TVCvof2RTw


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 12:27 am:

I notice that the back always goes to the right when i hit washboards. Unfortunately, the T is too slow to travel well on washboards, 55 mph is about the minimum speed you want to drive, at 80 you hardly notice them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin Konrad on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 12:38 am:

Also enjoyed the 'Washboard' videos that followed. Thanks, Steve!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 07:02 am:

Steve: What will I do with my thimbles and tambourine if the Feds make me do away with my washboard ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 08:49 am:

Steve, you are a century late with your complaints: "On July 1, 1913, a group of automobile enthusiasts and industry officials established the Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) "to procure the establishment of a continuous improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to lawful traffic of all description without toll charges." "

"The LHA announced the route on September 14, 1913. The announcement disappointed many of the town officials, particularly in Colorado and Kansas, who had greeted the Trail-Blazers and thought the passage of the LHA meant the route had been selected."

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/infrastructure/lincoln.cfm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 09:50 am:

Drag a 20' length of cyclone fence with you and those ripples all go away. Of course, the
speeders with help put them all back in short order.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 - 09:23 pm:

I drive a lot of gravel roads. The County crews seem to do a decent job
of keeping the washboarding down pretty well, but sometimes I find one
that is really bad. The TT doesn't seem to mind them at all. 15mph with
those skinny tires cuts right through the loose stuff.

Anyway, ... I was driving one of those roads today and reminded of
this thread, which, in turn, reminded me of another thread here that showed
and old ad or photograph of a T with special tires designed FOR dealing with
washboard roads.

Anyone remember this ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 07:46 am:

Burger, I'm not sure you and I are thinking of the same thing. Around here, a washboard road is hard as a brick and nothing short of a motor grader is going to smooth it out. And unless the special tires are huge with about 2 psi in them, it's still going to be a rough ride. I tend to avoid long drives on dirt roads in my TT due to the heavy suspension making it such a rough ride. I'm afraid it will shake it to pieces. The Touring, on the other hand, does very well on the dirt roads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 07:55 am:

My impression of a washboard road is the same as Hal. Hard and bumpy.
If not repaired they get worse until holes that swallow VW's develop.

Now ruts are another thing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 08:21 am:

We have lived on gravel since 1977 with a lot of heavy truck traffic.The dump trucks with scraper blades the county use are good for a couple of years but then the road needs to be re cut with the long heavy construction grader.Two elevators the suger beet dump pickel station,and a very large dairy within 5 miles and some of it is very ripe!!!!!! Bud on gravel in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 09:34 am:

We do pretty good with roads in our town-----with log trucks, campers, and fishing rigs from all over coming in the taxes collected must pay for it!
As far as T driving though try a log truck, fifty foot long pickup and boat or usually a young girl ten feet behind you wanting to pass when you are going the speed limit! I like driving when school starts, every thing calms down!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 10:14 am:

Not all dirt roads have it, and I think the reason for that is that it requires a certain type of soil that doesn't occur everywhere. I once mentioned a particularly bad local road to a friend who had been on the township board. He said they tried everything they could think of to get rid of that washboard, and no matter what they did to smooth it out, it soon returned. I think the worst I ever saw was on the road that now is Federal Highway 5, along the east coast of Baja California. In those days it was not only unpaved, a lot of it was ungraded. Some sections had miles and miles of washboard so bad that going as fast as 10 MPH threatened to shake your vehicle to pieces. The upside of those roads was that they kept out the riffraff. My buddy and I camped on the beach at Bahia de Los Angeles for a week, and in all that time we saw only one other vehicle when some local guys came out to fish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:37 pm:

Often what's under a road is as important as what's on top! The county uses chloride/salt brine to hold the dust down and keep the road solid but our cars/trucks do not last!! Kind of sad when we pay as much fuel tax as anyone but Joe in the sub divison has everything paved but if farm country where millions of dollars of crops are we have gravel?? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.PS,Opp's i forgot the Wind Turbines! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:51 pm:

I understand washboards what I don't understand is road crews deliberately installing them on asphalt roads in groups of decreasing distance just because you are approaching a stop sign on a rural road!:-(


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